ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Jacquelyn Wilson
System: Baldwin County
School: Robertsdale Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34738

Title:

Civil Rights Movement in Alabama

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson, students will research a topic from the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama. Then the students will create a presentation using Google Slides. Students will then share their presentation with the class. 

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 3-5
8 ) Collect information from a variety of digital sources.

Examples: online libraries, multimedia dictionaries

•  Using technology tools to organize information
•  Demonstrating efficient Internet search strategies
Example: keyword search

•  Evaluating electronic resources for reliability based on publication date, bias, accuracy, and source credibility
Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 3-5
10 ) Use digital environments to collaborate and communicate.

Examples: publishing online journals, sharing presentations, contributing to online discussions, communicating with experts

•  Producing digital works collaboratively
Examples: developing shared writing projects and group multimedia projects

Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 3-5
12 ) Create a product using digital tools.

Examples: products—digital story, podcast, digital artwork

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the social, political, and economic impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement on Alabama.
  • Describe the impact of important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Summarize the significance of key events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954.
  • Will identify the purpose and goals of education in American society and explain why African Americans chose to challenge segregated education in their quest for equality.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • analyze
  • interpret
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • protest (violent and non-violent)
  • boycott
  • sit-in
  • segregation
  • integration
  • Jim Crow
  • suffrage
  • rights
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many of the key leaders that were vital to the modern Civil Rights movement including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • How the Montgomery Bus Boycott and other forms of protest impacted Alabama's economy.
  • How the many forms of non-violent protests were used to help African Americans in Alabama gain equality including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, and children's marches.
  • African Americans in Alabama were often the victims of violence while trying to gain equality (Sixteenth Street Church bombing, Freedom Riders bus bombing).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Describe events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret primary sources such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, and Letters from the Birmingham Jail.
  • Use vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many individuals and events had a social, political, and economic impact on the people of Alabama during the modern Civil Rights Movement. There were many benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board (1954).
  • The doctrine of separate but equal called for specific things.
  • These events also had a significant impact on the nation.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will describe important people and events from the Civil Rights Movement in Alabama.

The students will create a Google Slide presentation showing what they have learned about their assigned topic.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

The attachments below

Technology Resources Needed:

Computers/laptops with access to the Internet and Google Slides

Background/Preparation:

Teachers:

Be sure your students know how to download legal images and make sure they know how to create a presentation using Google Slides.

  Procedures/Activities: 

Day 1:

 

  1. Allow students to choose their Civil Rights topic from the list in the attachments. Remind students that they will be relating their topics to Alabama. Also, if there are not enough topics, have two students use the same larger topics (Martin Luther King Jr., Selma to Montgomery March, etc.)
  2. Go over what the students need to include in their Google Slide presentation. (See attachment.)
  3. Remind students about finding information from reliable online resources. They will need to make a credits slide with information about where they got their information. Here are some sites that are great for students:
  1. Go over who their audience will be. Explain to the students once all of the presentations are complete, they will be posted on our class blog for each of their classmates to view.
  2. Have the students to conduct their own research on their assigned topics. Students can create their Google Slide presentation while they research.
  3. Once they finish their Google Slide presentation, have the students share the link to their presentation. They can email the link to the teacher. Make sure it is open to public (anyone with a link can view) and others can only view (not edit) the presentation.

 

Day 2:

 

  1. Before students arrive, post all of the links to the presentations on the class blog.
  2. Have students review their presentation one more time. Each student will need to create a quiz question and answer based on their own presentation. The students will turn in the quiz question/answer to the teacher. (Review the question and make sure it is answered in the presentation.)
  3. Have students visit the class blog page that lists all of the links to the different presentations.
  4. Give each student a copy of the Taking Notes Graphic Organizer (attached). Tell the students they will need to record 2 things they learn from each presentation. Also tell students, they will be given a quiz after seeing all of the presentations.
  5. The students will review and take notes on each presentation.


Attachments:
**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Create a quiz using the questions submitted by the students. You can create a quiz quickly using Google Forms. Allow students to use their completed Taking Notes Graphic Organizer.

You can also grade their presentation using the Google Slides Rubric that is attached.

Acceleration:

As an extension, the students can create a digital storytelling movie using the facts and pictures they found during research.

Intervention:

Students can be given more time to complete their presentations. Students can work in groups. Instead of only allowing students to use their Taking Notes Graphic Organizer, allow them to use the presentations as they take the quiz.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.