ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Riding the Waves to an Excellent STEM Career 

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Katrina McGrady
System: Talladega County
School: Talladega County Board Of Education
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35682

Title:

Riding the Waves to an Excellent STEM Career 

Overview/Annotation:

During this lesson, the students will investigate the properties of the various types of electromagnetic radiation and complete an organizer chart on the information that they gather.  Then, they will choose a career that applies to one type of electromagnetic radiation and discuss how electromagnetic radiation is specifically used in this career in a short video. The video will examine the connection between how electromagnetic radiation is received and transmitted within their chosen career. Students completing the entire lesson in class will need approximately 5 class periods or 3 block periods to complete the lesson.  If the video is completed outside of class, the students will need approximately 3 class periods to complete the lesson.  

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.

 

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 9-12
Computer Applications
4 ) Utilize advanced features of word processing software, including outlining, tracking changes, hyperlinking, and mail merging.

Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 9-12
Computer Applications
6 ) Utilize advanced features of multimedia software, including image, video, and audio editing.

Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 9-12
Physical Science
15 ) Obtain and communicate information from published materials to explain how transmitting and receiving devices (e.g., cellular telephones, medical-imaging technology, solar cells, wireless Internet, scanners, Sound Navigation and Ranging [SONAR]) use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific and Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect; Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze science texts.
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis.
  • Determine central ideas or conclusions of science /technical text.
  • Evaluate and integrate multiple sources of information from visual, quantitative, and word formats to address questions or solve problems.
  • Form a coherent understanding of a process, phenomenon, or concept by synthesizing information from a range of sources.
  • Obtain information obtained from various sources showing how transmitting and receiving devices use wave behavior and interactions to transmit and capture information and energy.
  • Communicate information obtained from various sources showing how transmitting and receiving devices use wave behavior and interactions to transmit and capture information and energy.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Transmit
  • Receive
  • Devices
  • Waves
  • Frequency
  • Wavelength
  • Amplitude
  • Period
  • Velocity
  • Longitudinal waves (compression)
  • Transverse waves
  • Rarefactions
  • Interference (constructive and destructive)
  • Superposition
  • Reflection
  • Refraction
  • Wave behavior
  • Wave interactions
  • Matter
  • Capture
  • Energy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Three ways that waves may interact with matter are reflection, refraction, and diffraction.
  • The controlled use of waves have applications in science. Wave types vary based on wave speed, type of material (medium) required, motion of particles, and how they are produced.
  • Solar cells are human-made devices that likewise capture the sun's energy and produce electrical energy. Photoelectric materials emit electrons when they absorb light of a high-enough frequency.
  • When a light wave encounters an object, they are either transmitted, reflected, absorbed, refracted, polarized, diffracted, or scattered depending on the composition of the object and the wavelength of the light.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Cite specific textual evidence to support analysis of science and technical texts attending to the precise details of explanations or descriptions.
  • Determine the central ideas or conclusions of a text; trace the explanation or depiction of a complex process, phenomenon, or concept; provide an accurate summary of the text distinct from prior knowledge or opinions.
  • Communicate information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Multiple technologies based on the understanding of waves and their interactions with matter are part of everyday experiences in the modern world (e.g., medical imaging, communications, scanners) and in scientific research.
  • Transmitting and receiving devices use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.
  • Information can be digitized (e.g., a picture stored as the values of an array of pixels); in this form, it can be stored reliably in computer memory and sent over long distances as a series of wave pulses.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will describe the wavelengths and properties of the various types of electromagnetic radiation.  

The students will describe how transmitting and receiving devices for the electromagnetic spectrum are used in current forms of technology that use wave behavior to capture and transmit energy and information.

The students will create a video that demonstrates how transmitting and receiving devices for the electromagnetic spectrum are used in modern careers.   

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Learning Targets:

I can describe properties of the electromagnetic spectrum.

I can describe how transmitting and receiving devices for the electromagnetic spectrum and wave behavior are used in current STEM careers.  

I can create a digital presentation that teaches others about careers that use the electromagnetic spectrum and how transmitting and receiving devices for the electromagnetic spectrum are used in this career.  

 

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Before starting this lesson, the teacher should check all links to make sure they operate on the school network. Also, the teacher should be familiar with the electromagnetic spectrum and the following properties:  energy, wavelength, and uses of each type. Since students will be using the internet to research, I recommend that they do the graphic organizer digitally. However, if it is done on paper, please be sure to make copies of the organizer chart and the video rubric for all students prior to the start of the lesson. If you do not have access to paper or copies, students can certainly create the graphic organizer chart on their own notebook paper. Simply project the chart on the screen for them to copy before they begin their research.  

paper and pen/pencil (for notes or completion of the chart on paper)

Picture of x-ray 

Electromagnetic Graphic Organizer Chart (see attached document and make copies for each student, if it will not be done digitally; a link for digital copy in Google docs is provided here)

Career Video Rubric (see attached document and make copies for each student if it will not be completed digitally)

Electromagnetic Video Resource  (to be used as initial research during the lesson)

Electromagnetic Tour Resource (to be used as initial research during the lesson)

3-2-1 Electromagnetic Spectrum (see attached PDF or PowerPoint presentation)

Movie editing application (i.e. iMovie, WeVideo)

Video camera from a Chromebook, laptop, or cell phone (if narrated slides are not used to create the video)

 

Technology Resources Needed:

Teacher computer with presentation to TV or projector

Student computers with internet access

Digital copy of Organizer Chart to address Technology Standard 4 (if it is not done on paper)

Digital copy of the movie rubric (if it is not provided on paper)

Movie editing application (i.e. iMovie, WeVideo)

Video camera (if narrated slides are not used to create the video)

Background/Preparation:

For the teacher:

Prior to the start of this lesson, the teacher should be familiar with electromagnetic radiation and properties of each type. The teacher should also check all links to ensure that they will play on the student devices on the school network. Some knowledge of the video editing software that is available to the students may be needed if the students are not confident in their video editing skills and require assistance. If the lesson is done digitally, a digital copy will have to be sent to each student.  If the chart and rubric will be completed on paper, a hard copy should be made for each student prior to the start of the lesson.  

For the students:

This lesson can be used to introduce the electromagnetic spectrum to students so little student background knowledge is needed. Students will need to be familiar with how to choose reliable resources in their research.  

  Procedures/Activities: 

This entire lesson will take approximately 1 week of class to complete.  

Before Strategy/Engage:  

Day 1. Show the students the picture of an x-ray included in the materials. Have them initially write down everything that they know about that x-ray. Ask for student responses. Then, ask them if they can see x-rays and how do they know that x-rays are present. Ask additional follow-up questions based on the class responses. Then, tell the students that the electromagnetic spectrum is used in society every single day in a variety of careers. During this lesson, they will explore the electromagnetic spectrum and its properties. Then, they will research a career using one type of wave on the spectrum and describe how electromagnetic waves are transmitted and received in this career.  

During Strategy/Explore/Explain:

Day 1.  After the before strategy, the students will use the NASA electromagnetic video and the NOVA Electromagnetic Tour Interactive to gather information to complete the electromagnetic organizer chart. They should also begin to add information based on their own research for the transmission and reception of the waves in a career using the electromagnetic spectrum that THEY CHOOSE. At the end of class on day one, discuss the spectrum and the properties of each type of wave. Discuss the patterns that are present in wavelength, frequency, ability to ionize matter, etc. Have the students complete a 3-2-1 as a formative assessment at the end of class. The attached PDF and PowerPoint Presentation provide information regarding this assessment. (1 to 2 class periods)

After Strategy/Explain/Extend:

At the beginning of class on days 2-3, ask the students some questions to review their research: Which type of electromagnetic radiation has the MOST energy?  The LEAST energy?  Which type of electromagnetic radiation is invisible to the human eye?  Which type(s) of electromagnetic radiation may be used in medical careers? Which type(s) of electromagnetic radiation may be used in telecommunications careers? Feel free to feed off of student answers on the 3-2-1 from the previous and guide them based on their responses in class. Then, introduce the rubric for the video to the students. Answer any questions that they may have regarding the video assignment. Each student should then add research to their chart that will specifically help them create their video. Finally, have each student create a video that describes one type of electromagnetic wave and how it is specifically used in a career. They should also include how the wave is transmitted and received in this career. Use the video rubric to grade their video as a summative assessment. The creation of the video could be done as a homework assignment, if students have access to the materials outside of class and if they are comfortable using video editing software.  If students do not have access to the editing materials outside of class, creating the video in class will ensure that ALL students will complete the assignment. (2 to 3 class periods)

At the end of the activity, the students may love to show their videos to the class or even the school if time allows.  If possible, a class contest could be held and the top three videos could be placed on the school webpage.  



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Formative:  Student responses on the Electromagnetic Chart 3-2-1 Response (See attached slides for the formative assessment.)

It would be helpful if the teacher read over these responses prior to the lesson the next day so that any misconceptions could be addressed.  

Summative:  Electromagnetic Career Video Rubric

With the completion of the project, the student could really use any video editing software that they chose if it is allowed for school use. iMovie is very good if Apple devices are available. WeVideo is a very good video editing option if Chrome Books and Google Apps are available.  As for specific instructions, the rubric is used to grade the student on the activity. The students can use a question/answer format, a moving slide presentation, a public service announcement, or any other format that covers the topic required in the rubric. Their creativity should really come into play with the creation of the project.  In addition, there are literally hundreds of careers that the students may use:  artist, x-ray technologist, CT technologist, radiologist, telecommunications engineer, radiation therapist, art therapist, soldier, etc. If the students are given the room to explore the careers on their own, then they will perhaps choose a career that interests them most. You may have a list of careers to help students who are having a difficult time choosing a career to research.  

For students who may not be able to complete the project on their own, differentiated instruction can be provided by allowing them to complete the project in groups or making a PowerPoint presentation instead of a movie. 

Acceleration:

Students can find a person in the career that they chose to research and set up a Skype interview with the class or write a letter to that person to set up a classroom visit.

Intervention:

Students who are struggling with basic concepts can be remediated using small group or individual instruction during video construction time.  

 

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.