ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Animal Adaptions for Grades 3-5

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Amanda Walker
System: Hoover City
School: Bluff Park Elementary School
And
Author:Carol McLaughlin
System: Hoover City
School: Greystone Elementary School
The event this resource created for:Birmingham Zoo
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35692

Title:

Animal Adaptions for Grades 3-5

Overview/Annotation:

HyperSlides are digital lessons/units that help students learn the material in a way that is engaging and inquiry-based. Students will work together to complete a HyperSlides unit centering around animal adaptations for standards in grades 3-5. Students will work creatively and collaboratively with a variety of Course of Study standards that engage students through using Google Slides and a Hyperlinks to assist in the understanding of animal adaptations. This project will take several class periods to complete. After an introduction to the Hyperslides, students are encouraged to work at their own pace, but Hyperslides can be assigned on a daily basis.

This Lesson Plan was created in partnership with the Birmingham Zoo. 

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
10 ) Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers. [RI.3.1]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
14 ) Use text features and search tools (e.g., key words, sidebars, hyperlinks) to locate information relevant to a given topic efficiently. [RI.3.5]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
22 ) Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons. [W.3.1]

a. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons. [W.3.1a]

b. Provide reasons that support the opinion. [W.3.1b]

c. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons. [W.3.1c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section. [W.3.1d]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
22 ) Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. [W.4.1]

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which related ideas are grouped to support the writer's purpose. [W.4.1a]

b. Provide reasons that are supported by facts and details. [W.4.1b]

c. Link opinion and reasons using words and phrases (e.g., for instance, in order to, in addition). [W.4.1c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. [W.4.1d]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
22 ) Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons and information. [W.5.1]

a. Introduce a topic or text clearly, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure in which ideas are logically grouped to support the writer's purpose. [W.5.1a]

b. Provide logically ordered reasons that are supported by facts and details. [W.5.1b]

c. Link opinion and reasons using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., consequently, specifically). [W.5.1c]

d. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the opinion presented. [W.5.1d]

Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
11 ) Construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism's ability to survive when compared to the resources in a certain habitat (e.g., freshwater organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in saltwater; desert organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in woodlands).

a. Construct explanations that forming groups helps some organisms survive.

b. Create models that illustrate how organisms and their habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

c. Categorize resources in various habitats as basic materials (e.g., sunlight, air, freshwater, soil), produced materials (e.g., food, fuel, shelter), or as nonmaterial (e.g., safety, instinct, nature-learned behaviors).

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific and Engineering Practices:
Engaging in Argument from Evidence; Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions; Developing and Using Models; Using Mathematics and Computational Thinking
Crosscutting Concepts: Cause and Effect; Systems and System Models; Structure and Function
Disciplinary Core Idea: Unity and Diversity
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Make a claim to be supported with evidence that in a particular habitat, some organisms can survive well, some can survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
  • Describe the given evidence necessary to support the claim that in a particular habitat, some organisms can survive well, some can survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
  • Evaluate the evidence to determine whether it is relevant to and supports the claim that in a particular habitat, some organisms can survive well, some can survive less well, and some cannot survive at all.
  • Use reasoning to construct an argument, connecting the relevant and appropriate evidence to the claim, including describing that any particular environment meets different organisms' needs to different degrees due to the characteristics of that environment and the needs of the organisms (including the cause-and-effect relationship).
  • Describe the evidence necessary to support the explanation that forming groups helps some organisms survive.
  • Create models to describe and illustrate how organisms and their habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.
  • Categorize resources in various habitats based on evidence from constructed arguments, explanations, and models.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Construct
  • Argument
  • Evidence
  • Likelihood
  • Organism
  • Survive
  • Resources
  • Habitat
  • Explanations
  • Groups
  • Populations
  • Communities
  • Niche
  • Illustrate
  • Models
  • System
  • Depend (on each other)
  • Categorize
  • Basic needs (examples: sunlight, air, fresh water, & soil)
  • Produced materials (examples: food, fuel, shelter)
  • Nonmaterial (examples: safety, instinct, nature-learned behaviors)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Some kinds of organisms survive well, some survive less well, and some cannot survive at all in a certain habitat.
  • If an environment fully meets the needs of an organism, that organism can survive well within that environment.
  • If an environment partially meets the needs of an organism, that organism can survive less well (lower survival rate, increased sickliness, shorter lifespan) than organisms whose needs are met within that environment.
  • If an environment does not meet the needs of that organism, that organism cannot survive within that environment.
  • Characteristics of a given environment (Examples: soft earth, trees, and shrubs, seasonal flowering plants).
  • Characteristics of a given organism (plants with long, sharp, leaves; rabbit coloration) .
  • Needs of a given organism (shelter from predators, food, water).
  • Characteristics of organisms that might affect survival.
  • How and what features of the habitat meet or do not meet the needs of each of the organisms.
  • Being a part of a group helps animals obtain food, defend themselves, and cope with changes.
  • Members of groups may serve different functions and different groups may vary dramatically in size.
  • Habitats and organisms make up a system in which the parts depend upon each other.
  • Resources and can categorize them as basic materials, produced materials or nonmaterials as resources in various habitats.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Make a claim supported by evidence about an organism's likelihood of survival in a given habitat.
  • Use reasoning to construct an argument.
  • Evaluate and connect relevant and appropriate evidence to support a claim.
  • Construct explanations that forming groups helps some organisms survive.
  • Articulate a statement describing evidence necessary to support the explanation that forming groups helps some organisms survive.
  • Create a model that illustrates how organisms and habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.
  • Describe relationships between components of the model.
  • Categorize resources in various habitats as basic materials, produced material, or nonmaterial.
  • Organize data from the categorization to reveal patterns that suggest relationships.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Cause and effect relationships are routinely identified and used to explain change.
  • Evidence suggests a causal relationship within the system between the characteristics of a habitat and the survival of organisms within it.
  • The cause and effect relationship between being part of a group and being more successful in obtaining food, defending themselves, and coping with change.
  • That the relationship between organisms and their habitats is a system of related parts that make up a whole in which the individual parts depend on each other.
  • Resources in various habitats have different structures that are related to their function.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Heredity and Diversity
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
9 ) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific and Engineering Practices:
Engage in Argument from Evidence
Crosscutting Concepts: Systems and System Models; Structure and Function
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Argue from evidence to support that the internal and external structures of plants function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • Argue from evidence to support that the internal and external structures of animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • argue
  • articulate
  • evidence
  • internal
  • external
  • structure
  • survival
  • function
  • behavior
  • reproduction
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Internal and External structures serve specific functions within plants and animals.
  • The functions of internal and external structures can support survival, growth, behavior and/or reproduction in plants and animals.
  • Different structures work together as part of a system to support survival, growth, behavior, and/or reproduction.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Articulate an explanation from evidence explaining how the internal and external structures of plants and animals function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.
  • Determine the strengths and weaknesses of the evidence collected, including whether or not it supports a claim about the role of internal and external structures of plants and animals in supporting survival, growth, behavior, and/or reproduction.
  • Use reasoning to connect the relevant and appropriate evidence to support an argument about the function of the internal and external structures of plants and animals.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Plants and animals have both internal and external structures that serve various functions in growth, survival, behavior, and reproduction.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Animal Studies

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will...

  • analyze information gathered from the HyperSlides to problem solve.
  • compare and contrast ideas with other students.
  • observe and recall of information from a nonfiction text by reading a nonfiction passages about animals in the Savanna.
  • observe, analyze, and reflect on information about animal adaptations from a nonfiction videos.
  • enhance communication skills by working together in pairs, groups, or the whole class to complete the HyperSlides.
  • use higher-order thinking and perseverance to develop an argument to defend a design of an animal with its adaptations and habitat
  • develop a habitat showcasing an animal and its adaptations.
  • construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism’s ability to survive in a certain habitat.

 

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Students

  • Animal Adaptation HyperSlides 
  • Computer lab, Chromebook, etc.
  • Internet access
  • Google Slides access
  • Google Drawing or PBS Scratch Jr. (App) access
  • Google Docs access
  • Kahoot-Students will need to know how to log into a Kahoot game and play. 
  • If students do not have access to technology: Post-it notes, paper, pencil, crayons or markers, scissors, assorted materials like glue and construction paper. 

Teachers

Technology Resources Needed:

 

Background/Preparation:

Before beginning this lesson, students should have some basic knowledge of how to use a computer or a Chromebook, as well as experience using Google Slides, Google Docs, and hyperlinks. While working through the HyperSlides, students will work to add text and follow hyperlinks to read nonfiction text and watch nonfiction videos. Students will also need to access to PBS Scratch Jr. or Google Drawings to create a habitat. If students have not used PBS Scratch Jr. or Google Drawings, they may need an introductory lesson before starting the HyperSlides. Students will need to be able to use Google Docs to create an opinion piece of writing. 

Before beginning this lesson, the teacher should look through the teacher guide and the student HyperSlides to get the layout of the lesson and answer any questions about using HyperSlides with students. This lesson can be done as a whole group, in small groups, or independently. The optimal grouping situation would be small groups to increase collaboration, creativity, communication, and critical thinking.  The whole group situation is only encouraged in a situation where students do not have access to technology.  

  Procedures/Activities: 

Before

Introduce or review standards with students.  If this is the student's first time to be introduced to the standards, let students develop "I can" statements with your assistance.  

1. Write the full standard on chart paper or the board. Teachers can also type the standard in a Google Doc/Word document and display it on the board.  For example: Construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism's ability to survive when compared to the resources in a certain habitat (e.g., freshwater organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in saltwater; desert organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in woodlands). 

2.  Read the standard aloud to students. Ask students to tell about words they already know. Students will tell definitions to assorted words throughout the standard.  The teacher can record these definitions next to the words on the chart paper.

3.  Using all the notes made on the standard, students and teacher should work together to develop the "I can" statement. Example: "I can give reasons with evidence of how an animal would survive given the available resources in a habitat."

During

1. The teacher should tell students that they will work together to complete a HyperSlidesThe Teacher will introduce the Animal Adaptations HyperSlides by displaying the Animal Adaptations HyperSlides on the board/screen. You can also share the document with the students through this shortened link: https://goo.gl/kTe27S  

2.  The teacher will describe to students how they will be grouped to complete the HyperSlides: individually, in partners, or in groups of up to 3 students.   

3.  The teacher will walk students step by step through the HyperSlides to discuss features/assignments. 

      Slide 2: Guiding Question-Teacher can read this question with the students.  

The following slides will be completed by students individually or in small groups.  The teacher will just show students specifics of how to use each slide, but not complete slides with students.  

      Slide 3: Show students how to click on the PBS Video that explains Survival in the Savanna.

      Slide 4: Chart to point out behavior and physical adaptions of the cheetah. Explain how clicking on the picture of the cheetah will lead to a National Geographic article about the Cheetah. 

       Slide 5: Show students how to click on each animal to Hyperlink to facts about each one.  Students will add physical or behavioral adaptations to the chart under each animal in the slide.

       Slide 6: Students will click on the giraffe to watch a National Geographic video about giraffe adaptations.  Students will then click on the chart to add 3 to 5 thoughts from the video.

       Slide 7: Students will watch a PBS Video from the Wild Kratts about Animal Adaptations. After the video, students can work in PBS Scratch Jr. (incorporates coding in an app) or Google Drawings to make a virtual habitat for an animal that would showcase how animal adaptations the animal would use in that habitat. Students could use pen and paper to complete this creation task without access to PBS Scratch Jr. or Google drawings.  Work should be shared with teacher upon completion.

       Slides 8:  Students will use Google Docs or Google Slides, to create an argument, with evidence, to explain their animal’s ability to survive in their created habitat.  Work should be shared with teacher upon completion.

       Slide 9:  Reflection Page

       Slide 10: Students will create a question for a class Kahoot by entering a question onto the slide.  

4. Students will work through the HyperSlides or in small groups at their own pace until the Slides have been completed. It may take several class periods for students to complete the HyperSlides.  

During Activity for students that do not have access to technology, but teacher has a shared device.

1. Teacher should tell students that they will work together to complete a HyperSlidesThe Teacher will introduce the Animal Adaptations HyperSlides by displaying the Animal Adaptations HyperSlides on the board/screen.  

2.  The teacher will explain to the students that the HyperSlides will be completed as a class.

3.  The Teacher will walk students step by step through the HyperSlides. 

      Slide 2: Guiding Question- Teacher should read question to students.  

      Slide 3: Watch PBS Video that explaining Survival in the Savanna.

      Slide 4: Together, read over behavior and physical adaptions of the cheetah. Explain how clicking on the picture of the cheetah will lead to a National Geographic article about the Cheetah. Teachers can print this article for students to read before showing the chart of the behavioral and physical adaptations. 

If lesson is being completed whole group, stop for the day and complete the reflection page on slide 9.

       Slide 5: Teacher can print biofacts from each animal at the zoo by clicking on the animal's picture.  Students can work in small groups for each animal to determine physical or behavioral adaptations.  Students will report to teacher findings about each animal to add physical or behavioral adaptations to the chart. 

       Slide 6: Click on the giraffe to watch a National Geographic video about giraffe adaptations. Students can record on post it notes thoughts from watching the video.  Students will report thoughts to teacher to record on the slides chart. 

If lesson is being completed whole group, stop for the day and complete the reflection page on slide 9.

       Slide 7: Students will watch a PBS Video from the Wild Kratts about Animal Adaptations. Students will work to create a model of a habitat that illustrates how an animal and their habitat make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.  Students can just draw this or they can create a 3D model using available materials. While building their animal and habitat, students will need to focus on the following questions from the slide: Does your habitat have basic materials such as sunlight, air, freshwater, and soil? Does your habitat have any produced materials such as food, fuel, and shelter?, and Does your animal have nonmaterial resources such as safety, instinct, or nature-learned behaviors?

       Slides 8:  After building their animal and habitat, students create an argument, with evidence, to explain their animal’s ability to survive in their created habitat. Students should be able to state their opinion, tell their readers why they feel that way, give readers 1 to 3 examples of why they feel that way citing evidence of resources in the habitat, and restate their opinion as a closing.

       Slide 9:  Reflection Page-This slide can be printed for students to fill out independently. 

       Slide 10: This slide can also be printed for students to fill out.  Students will create a question for a class Kahoot by entering a question onto the slide.  

4. Students will work to complete their habitat model and argument at their own pace until completed.  It may take several class periods for students to complete.  

After

1.  At the end of each class period, Slide 9 can be used to reflect just at the end of the HyperSlides, or it can be used daily for a reflection time. 

2. After several class periods, students will start completing their HyperSlides. Students can work on acceleration activities. These activities can be assigned in Google Classroom or you can share their direct links with students. 

3. The teacher can compile all questions on Slide 10 to create a Kahoot for students to answer each other's questions about animal adaptations.  


  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Formative Assessment 

While students are working on slides 7-9, make observations of their work with these points....

Slide 7: Students will create a habitat for an animal to showcase their animal adaptations.  Things to consider when assessing:

1. Does the student's habitat have basic materials such as sunlight, air, freshwater, and soil?

2. Does the student's habitat have any produced materials such as food, fuel, and shelter?

3. Does the student's animal have non-material resources such as safety, instinct, or nature-learned behaviors?

Slide 8:  Students will use Google Docs or Google Slides to create Using Google Docs or Google Slides, to create an argument, with evidence, to explain their animal’s ability to survive in their created habitat.  Things to consider when assessing:

1. The student states an opinion of how their animal would survive in their created habitat.

2. The student is able to give multiple reasons with evidence to explain their animal's ability to survive in the created habitat.

3. The student uses linking words. 

4. The student is able to restate his/her opinion as a closing.

Slide 9:  Reflection Page-Assess items that students discovered and interesting facts. Use questions that students still have to encourage research into finding answers to extend lesson further. 

Slide 10:  Students will create a multiple choice animal adaptation question for a class Kahoot for information about animal adaptations. Observe student questions and answers for understanding of animal adaptations.  

 Summative Assessment

Slides 7-8: Teachers can use slides 7-8 for summative assessment when the HyperSlides has been completed. The teacher can use this checklist for assessment.  To have fully mastered the standards, students should be able demonstrate each of the items on the checklist.  Teachers can also provide feedback to students of how the task can be improved for re-submission.

Slide 10:  Students will create a multiple choice question for a class Kahoot for information about animal adaptations. Use these questions to create a class Kahoot to assess student knowledge of animal adaptations.  The Kahoot game allows students to use multiple choice questions in a game form.  If Kahoot is not an option, the teacher can compile all student questions in regard to the standards and create a test to print and copy. 

Acceleration:

Pose this STEM/STEAM activity: 

Essential Question: Can you make an adaptation similar to how animals have adaptations to help you get a cup that is out of your reach? Be ready to explain to others how it is like an animal adaptation.

Materials:  straws, paper, foil, string, craft sticks, pipe cleaners,  tape, and paper plates. You will also need plastic cups for the students to grab.

Activity: After completing the animal adaptation lessons with the class, give the students this challenge to make an adaptation tool that can help them get a cup out of their reach. Make a line on the floor or make a mark of some sort to determine the location where students will stand. Place the cups out of reach from that line. The students can use any of the materials listed (plus any that you think of) to create the tool. Students may work individually, with a partner, or in a group. You can add to the challenge by moving the cups or changing the cups to a different object that is not as easy to move.

Intervention:

  • If students need extra assistance in completing slides, students should be allowed to either work in a small group setting or with a peer helper.  
  • Google Docs offers voice dictate for anyone needing assistance with typing things to be inserted into Google Slides.
  • Students needing assistance in completing in a timely manner can be assigned checkpoints in completing the HyperSlides as needed.  
  • Quizlet to practice Animal Adaptation Vocabularyhttps://goo.gl/5AxAc9  Quizlet is a website that helps students to practice vocabulary through games, flashcards, writing, and spelling. Students can also take a test on Animal Adaptation words. 

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.