ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Right Before Our Eyes

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Stephanie Carver
System: Blount County
School: Hayden Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35780

Title:

Right Before Our Eyes

Overview/Annotation:

Students will explore how animals use vision to receive information through the senses, process that information, and respond to it in different ways. On day one, this lesson is broken into three station activities that allow the students to use kaleidoscopes, binoculars, and fish-eye mirrors to imagine what animals might have such vision and how they use this vision. On days two and three, the students will work collaboratively to create a presentation to explain how animals use vision to process information and respond to aid in survival.  

This lesson results from the ALEX Resource Gap Project.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 3-5
10 ) Use digital environments to collaborate and communicate.

Examples: publishing online journals, sharing presentations, contributing to online discussions, communicating with experts

•  Producing digital works collaboratively
Examples: developing shared writing projects and group multimedia projects

Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 3-5
12 ) Create a product using digital tools.

Examples: products—digital story, podcast, digital artwork

Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
11 ) Investigate different ways animals receive information through the senses, process that information, and respond to it in different ways (e.g., skunks lifting tails and spraying an odor when threatened, dogs moving ears when reacting to sound, snakes coiling or striking when sensing vibrations).

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations
Crosscutting Concepts: Systems and System Models
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Investigate different ways animals receive information through the senses.
  • Investigate different ways animals process the information they receive and how they respond to it.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • investigate
  • evidence
  • transmit
  • perception
  • receptors
  • senses
  • sensory information
  • process
  • memories
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Different types of sense receptors detect specific types of information within the environment.
  • Sense receptors send information about the surroundings to the brain.
  • Information that is transmitted to the brain by sense receptors can be processed immediately as perceptions of the environment and/or stored as memories.
  • Immediate perceptions or memories processed by the brain influences an animal's actions or responses to features in the environment.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify different ways animals receive, process, and respond to information.
  • Identify evidence of different ways animals receive, process, and respond to information to be investigated.
  • Plan ways to Investigate different ways animals receive, process, and respond to information.
  • Collect and communicate data of different ways animals receive, process, and respond to information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Sensory input, the brain, and behavioral output are all parts of a system that allows animals to engage in appropriate behaviors.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Animal Studies

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will identify how animals use vision to receive, process, and use the information to aid in survival.  

Students will work collaboratively to create a presentation on how animals use vision to receive, process, and use the information to aid in survival.  

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Kaleidoscope

Binoculars

Fish-eye mirror (can use photos taken with such lens)

Computers or Chromebooks (at least one per group)

Video "How Animals See the World"

Station Cards

National Geographic Article "Inside the Eye: Nature's Most Exquisite Creation" (If you click on this article several times from the same computer, it will ask you to subscribe to the magazine. Limit the number of times a student clicks on the article to prevent this. A student can also use different search engines to increase the number of times the article can be viewed.)

Google Slides or another presentation application of choice

Presentation Rubric (one per student)

Technology Resources Needed:

Computers or devices with access to Google Slides or another presentation application

Background/Preparation:

Students will need to be familiar with Google Slides or another presentation application.  Students must be able to work collaboratively to create a presentation.  Students must be able to identify sight as one of the five senses animals use for survival.  

Teachers must prepare and set up the 3 station activities.  If you have a larger class, creating 6 stations, 2 of each, would be beneficial.  Student groups of 4 should be created.  The teacher should be familiar with Google Slides, or a presentation application of choice, and be prepared to answer questions or guide students through the application.  

  Procedures/Activities: 

Before/Engage:  

Ask the students: "How do animals use their vision to help them survive?  Show the video "How Animals See in the World."

Explain to the students that they will be investigating how animals use vision to receive, process, and use information through 3 station activities.  Make sure the students are in groups of 4.  

Show the students the kaleidoscope, binoculars, and fish-eye mirror.  Allow them to predict what animals they think have each of these three types of vision.

During/Explore:

Allow the students to visit each station, discussing the station card and trying out the different kinds of vision.

Station 1:  Kaleidoscope

Display the kaleidoscope information card.  Allow the students to try out the kaleidoscope to see how insects use their eyes to receive information.

The students should discuss the following question with their group:  How do you think this helps an insect receive, process, and use information?

Station 2:  Binoculars

Display the binoculars information card.  Allow the students to try out the binoculars to see how birds use their eyes to receive information.

The students should discuss the following question with their group:  How do you think this helps a bird receive, process, and use information?

Station 3:  Fish-eye Mirror (or photos)

Display the fish-eye mirror information card.  Allow the students to look through the lens or at the photos to see how fish use their eyes to receive information.

The students should discuss the following question with their group:  How do you think this helps a fish receive, process, and use information?

During/Explain:

Guide a group discussion on what the groups investigated and concluded from each station:

  • How does a fly's vision help it escape a frog?
  • How does an eagle's vision help it find food?
  • How does a fish's vision help it find food?
  • How does an animal's vision help it receive, process, and use information?

After/Elaborate: (Day 2 and 3)

Students will visit the National Geographic article "Inside the Eye: Nature's Most Exquisite Creation" to research how an animal using its sight to process information and use that information.  Each group of four students should choose one animal from this article and create a presentation using Google Slides or another presentation application of choice to include the following information:

  • Animal name and description with picture
  • How does the animal use its vision to receive information?
  • How does the animal use its vision to help it process information?
  • How does the animal use this information to aid in survival?

Students will present this information to the class.


  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Evaluate:

Formative - Teacher observations during the station activities and group discussions should informally assess the students throughout the lesson.

Summative - The teacher should formally assess the students' presentations on how the animal uses its vision to receive, process, and use information.  This simple rubric can be used to aid with the evaluation. 

Acceleration:

Students can be challenged to research other ways their animal of choice from the elaborate activity uses its senses to receive, process, and respond to information.  They should look for ways another one of the five senses is used by the animal. They can include this information in their presentation.  

Intervention:

Students who need extra support can be paired with a peer tutor throughout the lesson.  Key vocabulary terms should be taught to these students prior to the lessons--vision, kaleidoscope, binoculars, fish-eye lens.

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.