ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Congress: Requirements for Office, Members Currently Serving in the United States Congress, and Characteristics and Experiences Needed for Election to Public Office

You may save this lesson plan to your hard drive as an html file by selecting "File", then "Save As" from your browser's pull down menu. The file name extension must be .html.

  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Barry Leshinsky
System: Huntsville City
School: Challenger Middle School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 7005

Title:

Congress: Requirements for Office, Members Currently Serving in the United States Congress, and Characteristics and Experiences Needed for Election to Public Office

Overview/Annotation:

The students will research and present a computer slide-show on the requirements of office of the Senate and the House of Representatives and a special focus on the two Senators and a House member from one selected state. The students will create an election brochure in which they themselves will run for one of the above offices.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
TC2 (6-8)
5. Use basic features of word processing, spreadsheets, databases, and presentation software.
Examples: word processing—reports, letters, brochures
spreadsheets—discovering patterns, tracking spending, creating budgets
databases—contact list of addresses and telephone numbers
presentation software—slideshow
TC2 (6-8)
7. Demonstrate correct keyboarding techniques.
TC2 (6-8)
9. Practice responsible and legal use of technology systems and digital content.
Examples: avoiding plagiarism; complying with acceptable-use policies, copyright laws, and fair use standards; recognizing secure Web sites
  • Identifying examples of computer crime and related penalties
  • Examples: computer crime—phishing, spoofing, virus and worm dissemination, cyberbullying
    penalties—fines, incarceration
  • Citing sources of digital content
  • TC2 (6-8)
    11. Use digital tools and strategies to locate, collect, organize, evaluate, and synthesize information.
    Examples: locating—Boolean searches, graphic organizers, spreadsheets, databases
    collecting—probeware, graphing calculators
    organizing—graphic organizers, spreadsheets
    evaluating—reviewing publication dates, determining credibility
    synthesizing—word processing software, concept-mapping software
    TC2 (6-8)
    12. Use digital tools to communicate and collaborate at all levels from interpersonal to global.
    Examples: instant messages, e-mail, blogs, wikis, collaborative authoring tools, online learning communities
  • Demonstrating digital file transfer
  • Examples: attaching, uploading, downloading
    SS2010 (7) Civics
    4. Describe structures of state and local governments in the United States, including major Alabama offices and officeholders. (Alabama)
  • Describing how local and state governments are funded (Alabama)
  • SS2010 (7) Civics
    5. Compare duties and functions of members of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government. (Alabama)
  • Locating political and geographic districts of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government (Alabama)
  • Describing the organization and jurisdiction of courts at the local, state, and national levels within the judicial system of the United States (Alabama)
  • Explaining concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances among the three branches of state and national governments (Alabama)
  • SS2010 (7) Civics
    10. Describe individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States.
    Examples: individual—respect for rights of others, self-discipline, negotiation, compromise, fiscal responsibility
    civic—respect for law, patriotism, participation in political process, fiscal responsibility
  • Differentiating rights, privileges, duties, and responsibilities between citizens and noncitizens
  • Explaining how United States' citizenship is acquired by immigrants
  • Explaining character traits that are beneficial to individuals and society
  • Examples: honesty, courage, compassion, civility, loyalty
    SS2010 (7) Civics
    12. Describe how the United States can be improved by individual and group participation in civic and community activities.
  • Identifying options for civic and community action
  • Examples: investigating the feasibility of a specific solution to a traffic problem, developing a plan for construction of a subdivision, using maps to make and justify decisions about best locations for public facilities
  • Determining ways to participate in the political process
  • Examples: voting, running for office, serving on a jury, writing letters, being involved in political parties and political campaigns

    Local/National Standards:

     

    Primary Learning Objective(s):

    The student will explain the requirements for holding office in the United States Senate and House of Representatives. The student will analyze the most favorable prerequisites to run for public office and create a favorable, personal campaign brochure.

    Additional Learning Objective(s):

    Students will discuss those characteristics and experiences which are most desirous in a candidate for public office and in turn reveal traits and activities which would offer negative force to being elected to public office.

     Preparation Information 

    Total Duration:

    Greater than 120 Minutes

    Materials and Resources:

     

    Technology Resources Needed:

    Computer with Internet access, slide-show software,word processing software, and a printer. Digital Camera or scanner, desktop publishing software and computer projection capabilities (optional).

    Background/Preparation:

    The students should have a basic knowledge of computer usage related to Internet research, word processing, and media or slide-show software.

      Procedures/Activities: 
    1.)Using the internet, the students will research the requirements needed to be a U.S. Senator and a member of the House of Representatives. Websites students can use are http://www.house.gov/ and http://www.senate.gov/

    2.)Using the internet, the students locate information on the two U.S. Senators from a selected state and information on a member of the House of Representatives from that same state.

    3.)Using a photo search engine such as google.com or ditto.com, the student will obtain photos of their office-holders. Be careful about the copyright when using these sites. Websites for the individual congress member usually give permission to download photos (unless otherwise noted).

    4.)Using a search engine, the students will locate information and find personal websites on selected members of Congress. These websites usually have a lot of information and students should take notes on their officeholders to incorporate into the slide-show presentation.

    5.)See attachments(Instructions and Sample.ppt). The attachment lists requirements for the student created computer slide show.

    6.)Using Word processing or desktop publishing software, the students are to create an election brochure. See word attachment for brochure requirements (Election Brochure requirements). There is also a sample brochure (Student_Brochure.doc).

    7.)The students will present their slide-show and brochure in class. Student work should be evaluated using the grading rubric (see attachment Rubric.doc).


    Attachments:
    **Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
      Assessment  

    Assessment Strategies

    See attached Rubric.doc.

    Acceleration:

    Students may create generic positive and negative candidate charts and apply the findings to candidates currently seeking public office.

    Intervention:

     

    Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

    Presentation of Material Environment
    Time Demands Materials
    Attention Using Groups and Peers
    Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
    Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.