ALEX Lesson Plan

     

News Flash: The End of the Cold War

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:susan jones
System: Baldwin County
School: Daphne High School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 9395

Title:

News Flash: The End of the Cold War

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson is an inquiry into events that occurred during the Cold War era. It is a technology-based project on one event that occurred during the Cold War(1945-1991). The Cold War describes the tense and hostile relationship between the Soviet Union and the U.S. between 1945 and 1992. The communist government of the Soviet Union wanted to convert other countries to communism. The U.S. pledged to support free countries so they could resist communism. Both countries had nuclear weapons and were capable of launching a nuclear war. Other countries took sides in this international conflict. Many Western European countries sided with the U.S. to form NATO (National Atlantic Treaty Organization) in 1949. Eastern European countries signed the Warsaw Pact and formed an alliance with the Soviet Union.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Technology Education
TC2 (2009)
Grade: 9-12
Computer Applications
11 ) Critique digital content for validity, accuracy, bias, currency, and relevance.

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
11 ) Describe the international role of the United States from 1945 through 1960 relative to the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Blockade, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO). [A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

•  Describing Cold War policies and issues, the domino theory, McCarthyism, and their consequences, including the institution of loyalty oaths under Harry S. Truman, the Alger Hiss case, the House Un-American Activities Committee, and the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg
Examples: G.I. Bill of Rights, consumer economy, Sputnik, rock and roll, bomb shelters, Federal-Aid Highway Act

•  Locating areas of conflict during the Cold War from 1945 to 1960, including East and West Germany, Hungary, Poland, Cuba, Korea, and China
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the international role of the United States from 1945 through 1960 relative to the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Blockade, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).
  • Describe Cold War policies and issues, the domino theory, McCarthyism, and their consequences.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Cold War
  • domino theory
  • McCarthyism
  • space race
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The international role of the United States from 1945 through 1960.
  • Important events, policies, and issues such as the Truman Doctrine, the Marshall Plan, the Berlin Blockade, and the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, the domino theory, Sputnik and the beginning of the space race, and the consequences of each.
  • Important domestic events, policies, and issues such as McCarthyism, the institution of loyalty oaths, the Alger Hiss case, the House Un-American Activities Committee, the execution of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, the G.I. Bill of Rights, growth in the consumer economy, rock and roll, bomb shelters, Federal-Aid Highway Act and the consequences of each.
  • Location of areas of conflict during the Cold War.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate specific points on a map and identify political, social, and geographic changes that occurred during or as a result of a historical event.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to historical events.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The United States played an important international role from 1945 through 1960, including domestic and foreign policies and actions related to this expanded role and the Cold War.
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 11
United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
16 ) Describe significant foreign and domestic issues of presidential administrations from Richard M. Nixon to the present. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.g., A.1.h., A.1.i., A.1.k.]

Examples: Nixon's policy of détente; Cambodia; Watergate scandal; pardon of Nixon; Iranian hostage situation; Reaganomics; Libyan crisis; end of the Cold War; Persian Gulf War; impeachment trial of William "Bill" Clinton; terrorist attack of September 11, 2001; Operation Iraqi Freedom; war in Afghanistan; election of the first African-American president, Barack Obama; terrorism; global warming; immigration

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate and describe the importance and impact of significant foreign and domestic issues of presidential administrations from Richard M. Nixon to the present.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • scandal
  • pardon
  • hostage
  • Reaganomics
  • crisis
  • Cold War
  • impeachment
  • terrorist/terrorism
  • global warming
  • immigration
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Key foreign and domestic events during the presidential administrations from Richard M. Nixon to the present.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate specific points on a map and identify political, social, and geographic changes that occurred during or as a result of a historical event.
  • Integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information presented in diverse formats and media.
  • Evaluate an author's premises, claims, and evidence by corroborating or challenging them with other information related to historical events.
  • Read and comprehend historical texts independently and proficiently on various topics related to historical events.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were many importance and impact of significant foreign and domestic issues of presidential administrations from Richard M. Nixon to the present.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will: 1) review facts about the Cold War and 2) conduct Internet research and write a news article about a Cold War event.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Materials: *Computer with Internet access and printer,
*Printed Timeline about the Cold War
*Notebook paper,pen or pencil for notes *Publishing software

Technology Resources Needed:

 

Background/Preparation:

Prerequisite for this lesson should included a study of U.S. History between 1945-1991; with special emphasis on foreign and domestic policy influenced by the events of the Cold War.

  Procedures/Activities: 
1.)Review information about the Cold War: What was the Cold War? Who was involved? Was it really a war? Did direct military confrontation occur? Which countries were involved besides the United States and Soviet Union?

2.)Give students the following timeline of Cold War events. You may want to print out copies or put the information on an overhead projector: 1945: Yalta Agreement 1947: Truman Doctrine 1947: Marshal Plan 1948: Berlin Airlift 1949: NATO formed 1950: Korean War begins. 1952: U.S. tests first hydrogen bomb in Marshall Islands. 1953: Soviet Union tests first hydrogen bomb. 1953: Korean War ends. 1955: Warsaw Pact organized 1957: Launch of Sputnik 1950s: McCarthy Hearings 1961: Berlin Wall built 1961: Bay of Pigs 1962: Cuban Missile Crisis 1963: Installation of a Hot Line 1969: Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) begins. 1979: Invasion of Afghanistan 1987: Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty 1989: Berlin Wall comes down. 1990: Unification of East and West Germany 1991: Collapse of the Soviet Union

3.)Explain to students that they will research one Cold War event. (You may assign more than one student to an event such as the Korean War and have them write about different aspects.) Based on their research, students will use publishing software to write a mock news article about the event and include direct quotes and images. Remind students that their articles should answer the following: who was involved, what happened, where the event happened, when it took place, and why it was significant. Each article should include at least one image, such as a map or photograph.


5.)Have students display their articles in chronological order on a classroom bulletin board. (You may photocopy articles for students to read outside of class.)

6.)Once students have read all the articles, hold a discussion about the Cold War. To review what they've learned, follow the timeline and select students who will explain each event's significance.

  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Use the following three-point rubric to evaluate students' work during this lesson. Three points: Students were highly engaged in class discussions; demonstrated a good understanding of the Cold War; wrote a complete and organized news article that answered all questions about the event and included several other important details. Two points: Students participated in class discussions; demonstrated an understanding of the Cold War; wrote a complete and organized news article that answered most of the questions about the event and included some other important details. One point: Students participated minimally in class discussions; demonstrated an incomplete understanding of the Cold War; wrote an incomplete and disorganized news article that did not answer basic questions about the event and included few or no other important details.

Acceleration:

 

Intervention:

 

Each area below is a direct link to general teaching strategies/classroom accommodations for students with identified learning and/or behavior problems such as: reading or math performance below grade level; test or classroom assignments/quizzes at a failing level; failure to complete assignments independently; difficulty with short-term memory, abstract concepts, staying on task, or following directions; poor peer interaction or temper tantrums, and other learning or behavior problems.

Presentation of Material Environment
Time Demands Materials
Attention Using Groups and Peers
Assisting the Reluctant Starter Dealing with Inappropriate Behavior
Be sure to check the student's IEP for specific accommodations.