ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Alabama's Prehistoric Indians

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:TracyAnn Reece
System: St Clair County
School: Springville Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 32913

Title:

Alabama's Prehistoric Indians

Overview/Annotation:

In this seven-day lesson, students will explore, in depth, the lives of prehistoric Indians who lived in Alabama. Then students, working in cooperative groups, will choose one tribe to focus on as they create a musical parody about the tribe they have chosen.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.35- Report on a topic or tell a story, including a beginning, middle, and end and including relevant facts or details.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 3
Geographic and Historical Studies: People, Places, and Regions
13 ) Describe prehistoric and historic American Indian cultures, governments, and economics in Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: prehistoric—Paleo-Indian, Archaic, Woodland, Mississippian

historic—Choctaw, Chickasaw, Cherokee, Creek (Alabama)

•  Identifying roles of archaeologists and paleontologists
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Reconstruct a past event using various primary sources, including calendars and timelines.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • primary sources
  • calendars
  • timelines
  • reconstructing
  • past
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to use a calendar.
  • How to interpret a timeline.
  • Vocabulary: primary sources, calendar, timeline, past, historical letter, artifacts
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Read a calendar.
  • Create and use a timeline.
  • Analyze a historical document.
  • Utilize maps, photographs, and other visual historic resources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Primary sources play an important role in reconstructing the past.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.3.13- Identify American Indians that have lived in Alabama for many centuries; identify key aspects of American Indian cultures in Alabama.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
2 ) Relate reasons for European exploration and settlement in Alabama to the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.

•  Locating on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims
•  Tracing on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa
•  Explaining reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Locate on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims.
  • Trace on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
  • Explain reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • settlement
  • European exploration
  • culture
  • expansion
  • trade (barter)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The location, purpose, and importance of European settlements including Fort Conde, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims in early Alabama.
  • The routes taken by early explorers including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
  • Reasons for conflicts between Europeans and American Indians in Alabama from 1519 to 1840, including differing beliefs regarding land ownership, religion, and culture.
Skills:
The students will be able to:
  • Explain the impact of European explorers on trade, health, and land expansion in Alabama.
  • Locate on maps European settlements in early Alabama, including Fort Condé, Fort Toulouse, and Fort Mims.
  • Trace on maps and globes, the routes of early explorers of the New World, including Juan Ponce de León, Hernando de Soto, and Vasco Núñez de Balboa.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were specific reasons Europeans began exploring and settling in Alabama and this impacted existing settlements in Alabama.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.2- Using maps, demonstrate an understanding that people from Europe explored and settled in Alabama.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • locate information from digital sources to answer research questions.
  • curate information to present or share with others.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • curate
  • keyword
  • search engine
  • database
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that information to research questions can be obtained from digital sources.
  • how to use resources to organize information.
  • how to use resources to present or share with others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a list of keywords or phrases to enter into a search engine and/or database such as the Alabama Virtual Library.
  • use additional words or punctuation to narrow search such as AND (+), OR, NOT (
  • ), and quotation marks.
  • organize information.
  • share information by creating a digital resource.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be located from a digital source to answer research questions.
  • information can be organzied and shared by creating a digital resource.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce authentic artifacts using digital tools using various forms of media.
  • review and revise authentic artifacts using digital tools.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • multimedia
  • artifacts
  • Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • a variety of digital tools in which they can create or revise authentic artifacts to share their knowledge.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and create authentic artifacts using approved digital tools that meet COPPA guidelines.
  • review an authentic artifact to revise with new or additional information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • everyone can be an author, producer, director, etc.
  • , using digital tools.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • locate information from digital sources to answer research questions.
  • curate information to present or share with others.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • curate
  • keyword
  • search engine
  • database
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • information to research questions can be obtained from digital sources.
  • how to use resources to organize information.
  • how to find resources to present or share with others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a list of keywords or phrases to enter into a search engine and/or database such as the Alabama Virtual Library.
  • use additional words or punctuation to narrow search such as AND (+), OR, NOT (
  • ), setting date boundaries, or quotation marks ("").
  • organize information.
  • share information by creating a digital resource.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be located from a digital source to answer research questions.
  • information can be organzied and shared by creating a digital resource.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce authentic artifacts using digital tools.
  • review and revise authentic artifacts using digital tools.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • multimedia
  • artifacts
  • Children's Online Privacy Protection Act (COPPA)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a variety of digital tools in which they can create or revise authentic artifacts to share their knowledge.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and create authentic artifacts using approved digital tools that meet COPPA guidelines.
  • review an authentic artifact to revise with new or additional information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • everyone can be an author, producer, director, etc.
  • using digital tools.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
13) Synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • synthesize complex information from multiple sources in different ways to make it more useful and/or relevant.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • synthesize
  • relevant
  • timeline
  • flowcart
  • infographic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • information from multiple sources can be combined or synthesized.
  • there are multiple was to combine information to communicate with others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • synthesize information from multilple sources in a variety of ways to make it more useful such as a flowchart, timeline, infographic, multimedia etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information is obtained from multiple sources to better make sense of information.
  • information can be presented in different ways to make it more useful.

Local/National Standards:

National Standards
for the Social Sciences: NSS-USH.K-4.2

The History of Students’ Own State or Region

Understands the people, events, problems, and ideas that were significant in creating the history of their state.

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Through studying artifacts and historic dwellings via the Internet, students will gain a deeper understanding of the state’s first inhabitants and how they survived.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will compare and contrast Alabama's prehistoric Indian tribes using a Venn Diagram.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

• Student journal (or paper) for each student
• pencil for each student
• chart paper and markers

Technology Resources Needed:

• computer with Internet access
• digital video camera(s)
• iPad(s)
• iPod(s)
• movie editing software such as Windows Movie Maker

Background/Preparation:

Students should know how to fill out a Venn Diagram.

Students will need to be taught how to create, edit, and post a video podcast.  (To learn more about this topic, visit: https://alex.state.al.us/showpage.php?lnk=teacherzonedircommentpodcastdircommentpodcasttools.)

  Procedures/Activities: 

Day One: The Paleo Indians

  1. Each student should receive a copy of “Prehistoric Alabama At-a-Glance.” (See Appendix A, attached)
  2. Inform students that they will be learning and discovering amazing facts about 3 tribes that once lived in Alabama: the Paleo, Archaic, and Woodland Indians.
  3. Let students know that today they will begin exploring the Paleo Indian culture. Bring their attention to the suggested websites listed at the end of their copy of “Prehistoric Alabama At-a-Glance.” Let students know that on these websites, they will get to see actual artifacts from these groups, as well as the places where they lived.
  4. Working in cooperative groups, students should use the computer, iPod, iPad, etc. to find the answers to the following questions about Paleo Indians in their student journals:
    When did the Paleo Indians arrive in Alabama?
    o Why did the Paleo Indians come to Alabama?
    o Where did the Paleo live before they came to Alabama?
    o How did the Paleo get to Alabama?
    o How did the Paleo get food?
    o What natural resources did the Paleo use?
    o Where did the Paleo live?
    o Archaeologists, scientists who study tools and other items left behind by past generations to learn about how they lived, have found carvings left behind by the Paleo. What are these carvings called? What can we learn from the carvings?
    o In what geographic region of Alabama did the Paleo settle?
  5. After about 30 minutes, bring the students back together to a whole group setting. Discuss the questions as a group, and record student responses on a large piece of chart paper labeled “Paleo.”
  6. Let students know that during their next history lesson, they will explore the Archaic Indians.

Day Two: Archaic Indians

  1. Each student should have on hand their copy of “Prehistoric Alabama At-a-Glance”
  2. Bring the students’ attention to the chart paper labeled “Paleo” that was completed earlier.
  3. Have students recall some interesting facts they remember about the Paleo Indians.
  4. Let students know that today they will begin gaining knowledge about the prehistoric Indian tribe known as the Archaic Indians.
  5. Working in cooperative groups, students should use the computer, iPod, iPad, etc. to find the answers to the following questions about Archaic Indians in their student journals:
    o When did the Archaic Indians arrive in Alabama?
    o Where did the Archaic Indians live in Alabama?
    o How did the Archaic Indians get food?
    o What natural resources did the Archaic Indians use?
    o What did the Archaic use to improve their hunting? How did this weapon improve their hunting?
    o Archaeologists know that the Archaic Indians traded with other groups of people. What evidence have they found to support this?
    o Archaeologists believe that the Archaic Indians believed in life after death. Why do they believe this?
  6. After about 30 minutes, bring the students back together to a whole group setting. Discuss the questions as a group, and record student responses on a large piece of chart paper labeled “Archaic.”
  7. Let students know that during their next history lesson, they will explore the Woodland Indians.

Day Three: Woodland Indians

  1. Each student should have on hand their copy of “Prehistoric Alabama At-a-Glance”
  2. Bring the students’ attention to the pieces of chart paper labeled “Paleo” and “Archaic” that were completed earlier.
  3. Have students recall some interesting facts they remember about the Paleo and Archaic Indians.
  4. Let students know that today they will begin gaining knowledge about the prehistoric Indian tribe known as the Archaic Indians.
  5. Working in cooperative groups, students should use the computer, iPod, iPad, etc. to find the answers to the following questions about Archaic Indians in their student journals:
    o When did the Woodland Indians arrive in Alabama?
    o Where did the Woodland Indians live in Alabama?
    o How did the Woodland Indians get food?
    o What weapon did the Woodland Indians create that improved their hunting abilities?
    o How did the Woodland Indians live? (nomadic tribe, village, etc.)
    o How do archaeologists know that the Woodland Indians started having leaders emerge instead of all members of the tribe being equal?
    o What did Woodland Indians often build for religious ceremonies and burials?
  6. After about 30 minutes, bring the students back together to a whole group setting. Discuss the questions as a group, and record student responses on a large piece of chart paper labeled “Woodland.”
  7. Let students know that during their next history lesson, they will compare and contrast these three Indian groups using a Venn Diagram.

Day Four: Compare and Contrast

  1. Give each student a copy of a Venn Diagram. (Appendices.pdf-Appendix B-attached)
  2. Bring the students’ attention to the pieces of chart paper labeled “Paleo,” “Archaic,” and “Woodland” that were completed earlier.
  3. Have students, in cooperative groups, complete their Venn Diagrams in order to compare and contrast the three prehistoric tribes of Alabama.
  4. Let them know that in their next history lesson, the will be writing a parody, and producing a music video for the parody, in order to share the knowledge they’ve acquired about Alabama’s prehistoric Indians (you may need to explain parodies). Allow Students to view the podcast, "Hey Woolly Mammoth" which can be viewed by CLICKING HERE.

Day Five: Students, Start Your Imaginations!

  1. On this day, the cooperative groups that students have been working in, should decide on which of the three tribes they would like feature in their parody creation.
  2. Students should be given a copy of the grading rubric (Appendices.pdf-Appendix C-attached), and the teacher should go over this with the students thoroughly.
  3. Students should be given a copy of “Podcast Script Planning Sheet.” (Appendices.pdf-Appendix D-attached) If students are using this sheet for the first time, it may be necessary to guide them through filling out the first few slides.
  4. Let students know that they will have the next week to write and choreograph their parodies. During this time, they are responsible for obtaining or creating any props, costumes, etc., that will be needed for the production of their parody.
  5. Also, make sure that students know that they can create props at home, but all filming and editing must be completed at school.

Day Six: Action!

  1. After 5 days of preparation, students should begin the production of their music videos (podcasts).
    During this time, the teacher should assist groups as it is needed.
  2. Students should know that they will only have one school week (5 days) to have their video completed and posted on the class website.

Day Seven: Premier Day!

  1. Once all groups have completed posting their videos to the class website, have a video premiere “party.” You can even go all out and have popcorn while you watch your movies (check that no students have allergies before serving any food items).


Attachments:
**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Students will be assessed based on the produced parody.  See attached rubric (appendix C).

Acceleration:

Have students conduct additional on-line research about a different group of prehistoric indians that were found in a different region of the U.S.  Have the students create their own Venn Diagram to compare and contrast these two groups.

Intervention:

By grouping students into collaborative, mixed-ability groups, struggling students will be receiving assistance from peers.  If necessary, the teacher may need to have a conference throughout the lesson to check for student understanding through verbal response.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.