ALEX Lesson Plan

     

The Art of the Conquest of Mexico

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Mark Coleman
System: Montgomery County
School: Booker T Washington Magnet High School
The event this resource created for:CCRS
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33177

Title:

The Art of the Conquest of Mexico

Overview/Annotation:

Students will explore two different interpretations of the Conquest of Mexico by the Spanish, one in art and the other in literature. The perspectives of the same events as seen by the Spanish and the Aztecs will be explored. Students will highlight portions of both pieces of art to gain perspective of both sides.

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 10
United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
1 ) Compare effects of economic, geographic, social, and political conditions before and after European explorations of the fifteenth through seventeenth centuries on Europeans, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A. 1.d., A.1.g., A.1.i.]

•  Describing the influence of the Crusades, Renaissance, and Reformation on European exploration
•  Comparing European motives for establishing colonies, including mercantilism, religious persecution, poverty, oppression, and new opportunities
•  Analyzing the course of the Columbian Exchange for its impact on the global economy
•  Explaining triangular trade and the development of slavery in the colonies
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze and compare the impact of economic, geographic, social, and political conditions and events that influenced Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • indigenous
  • motives
  • mercantilism
  • persecution
  • oppression
  • impact
  • global
  • economic conditions
  • geographical conditions
  • social conditions
  • political conditions
  • Crusades
  • Renaissance
  • Reformation
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Effects of economic conditions of Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries. Effects of geographic conditions of Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries. Effects of social conditions of Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries. Effects of political conditions of Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries. Effects of European Explorations of the 15th through the 17th centuries.
  • Influence of the Crusades, the Renaissance, and the Reformation on European Exploration.
  • Motives for establishing colonies, including mercantilism, religious persecution, poverty, oppression, and new opportunities.
  • The course of the Columbian Exchange.
  • The effects of the triangular trade on regions of the world.
  • The development of slavery in the American colonies.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare by similarities and differences among the economic, geographical, social, and political conditions before and after European explorations.
  • Describe the influence of the Crusades, Renaissance, and Reformation on European exploration.
  • Analyze and evaluate the course of the Columbian exchange and its impact on the economies of the world.
  • Explain examples of how the triangular trade and the development of slavery affected the colonies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important economic, geographic, social, and political conditions that influenced Europe, American colonists, Africans, and indigenous Americans during and after the explorations of the 15th - 17th Centuries.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.10.1- Recognize the influence of the Crusades, Renaissance, and reformation on European exploration. Identify European motives for establishing colonies including mercantilism, religious persecution, poverty, oppression, and new opportunities. Identify the Columbian Exchange including the triangular trade and the development of slavery in the colonies.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will compare and contrast artistic representations of the Conquest of Mexico in art and poetry.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

31 to 60 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Teachers may want to print the text of "The Argument" rather than have students read from Web.

Technology Resources Needed:

Computer lab with Internet access.

 

Background/Preparation:

Parents may need to be informed that some of the images in the Diego Rivera mural may be disturbing.

 

  Procedures/Activities: 

Before:

1) Students will read the text of "The Argument" from The Conquistador by Archibald MacLeish. 

2) The teacher will explain that the poem was written from the memoirs of a Spanish participant of the Conquest. Discuss the poem in class. The teacher should highlight the sense of adventure in the piece.

3) Teacher and students will discuss the Diego Rivera mural on the Conquest from Palacio Nacional de Mexico.

During:

4) Students will use the Pixlr photo editor to crop sections of the Diego Rivera mural that illustrate Cortez's abuse of the Natives. Students will go to the Pixlr Editor and open the image from the following URL:  http://www.bluffton.edu/homepages/facstaff/sullivanm/mexico/mexicocity/rivera/4870.jpg 

Using the crop tool (see attached CropTool.png) students will select a portion of the mural image and crop the image so just the chosen portion remains. The students will choose to "Save" this image as Crop1.jpg (see attached image Save.png). Students will then click Edit and Undo in the Pixlr menu within the browser window (see attached image Undo.png) and crop another section of the mural. 

5) Students will write a short piece contrasting two excerpted portions of the poem that illustrate the Spanish attitude of the Conquest and the Aztec perspective of abuse and slavery depicted in the cropped images from the mural. The images will be included in a word processing document in a neat and orderly fashion.

After:

6) Teachers and students will then have a short concluding discussion of the two views of the Conquest and the nature of historical perspective.

 



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

A sample rubric for grading the students' word processing document is attached.

Acceleration:

Students may choose to write their own poem using historical details about the Conquest of Mexico.

Intervention:

Students who have difficulty processing written literature may be provided with the text before hand for pre-preparation.

Student mentoring with the image and the text may be provided for those failing to understand the assignment conceptually.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.