ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Let's Throw Paper!! Addition Game

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:LaTonya Barnes
System: Birmingham City
School: Princeton School
The event this resource created for:CCRS
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33191

Title:

Let's Throw Paper!! Addition Game

Overview/Annotation:

Students will throw addition problems or answers (on paper) across the classroom and find the matching problem or answer! Students will use mental math to compute the matching answer. Students will quietly walk around the classroom to find the person with the matching paper. Let’s throw math around!

This is a College- and Career-Ready Standards showcase lesson plan.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
6. Add and subtract within 20.

a. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by counting on.

b. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by making ten.

c. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by decomposing a number leading to a ten.

Example: 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9

d. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by using the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Example: Knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4.

e. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by creating equivalent but easier or known sums.

Example: adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use an efficient strategy (e.g., recall, doubles, counting on 1 or 2, close to doubles) to add numbers within 20.
  • Fluently add and subtract within 10.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Fluency
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Strategies for finding sums and differences within 20.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use addition and subtraction strategies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Addition and subtraction strategies can be used to compute sums and differences, and how.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.6.1: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10.
M.1.6.2: Add and subtract within 5.
M.1.6.3: Count forward and backward from a given number.
M.1.6.4: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
  • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
  • Identify numerals 0 to 10.
  • Count 0 to 10.
  • Understand key words in addition and subtraction word problems.
    Examples: all together, how many more, how many are left, in all.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Define addition as combining groups of objects.
  • Define subtraction as separating groups of objects.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 10 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Pair "taking away" with subtraction.
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Pair putting together with adding.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Separate from a larger group to make 2 smaller groups.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.6 Add and subtract numbers 1 to 15 using objects, pictures, and fingers.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 1
8. Solve for the unknown whole number in various positions in an addition or subtraction equation, relating three whole numbers that would make it true.

Example: determining the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ? - 3, and 6 + 6 = ?
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Solve single operation addition/subtraction equations containing a single unknown.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Equation
  • Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Strategies for solving simple addition or subtraction equations with one unknown.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • solve simple addition and subtraction equations.
    • Justify and explain their thinking.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • equalities contain expressions that name the same amount on each side of the equal sign, even with quantities unknown.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.8.1: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
    M.1.8.2: Identify fact families as a relationship between addition and subtraction.
    M.1.8.3: Recall basic addition and subtraction facts to ten.
    M.1.8.4: Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
    M.1.8.5: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Write numerals from 0 to 10.
    • Represent a given numeral 1 to 10 with objects or drawings.
    • Count forward from a given number 1 to 10.
    • Model joining sets of objects to total 10.
    • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
    • Identify numerals 1 to 10.
    • Count from 0 to 10.
    • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
    • Understand true, false, same (equal).
    • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
    • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
    • Count items in a set up to twenty.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
    • Understand one less than a number 2 through 20.
    • Understand one more than a number 1 through 20.
    • Understand positional terms with equal signs.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.7 Given three related whole numbers, construct a number sentence that is true, in relation to addition and subtraction.


    Mathematics
    MA2019 (2019)
    Grade: 1
    13. Add within 100, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value.

    a. Add a two-digit number and a one-digit number.

    b. Add a two-digit number and a multiple of 10.

    c. Demonstrate that in adding two-digit numbers, tens are added to tens, ones are added to ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

    d. Relate the strategy for adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Add within 100.
    • Explain their reasoning using concrete models or drawings, or using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
    • Relate the strategy used to a written method (symbolic and numeric recording of the steps used).
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Compose
    • Multiple of 10
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to add within 100 using place vaue strategies.
    • how to identify tens and ones.
    • how to compose two digit numbers.
    • how to decompose two digit numbers.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • add within 100.
    • Model addition problems using visual models.
    • Record strategies for solving addition problems.
    • Communicate the relationship between models and symbolic (numeric) representations.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • relationships between models of addition problems and written strategies of those models can be used to justify solutions.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.13.1: Demonstrate regrouping, total sum, and solve using drawings and concrete models.
    M.1.13.2: Model written method for recording horizontal addition problems.
    M.1.13.3: Determine the value of the number in the ones and tens place.
    M.1.13.4: Match the number in the ones, tens, and hundreds position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    M.1.13.5: Represent numbers with multiple models.
    Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
    M.1.13.6: Recall single-digit addition facts.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 0-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Recognize numbers from 0-10.
    • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
    • Understand the concept of size and amount.
    • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Understand that 10 1's = 10.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
    • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.
    • Recognize that numbers and numerals have meaning.
    • Rote count to 10.
    • Communicate number words.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.13 Compose and decompose numbers from 1 to 15 into one ten and ones using objects, drawings, or pictures.


    Local/National Standards:

     

    Primary Learning Objective(s):

    Students will be able to:

    • Add and subtract within 20
    • Determine the unknown whole number in an addition equation
    • Use concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and relate the strategy to a written method, and explain the reasoning used.

    Additional Learning Objective(s):

     
     Preparation Information 

    Total Duration:

    0 to 30 Minutes

    Materials and Resources:

    • Paper
    • Basket
    • Book: Counting on Fall by Lizann Flatt

    Technology Resources Needed:

    Computer with Internet access

    Background/Preparation:

    • Teacher will write addition equations on half-size copy paper and ball up the papers. Example: 2 + 6 =
    • Teacher will write answers to the equations on half-size copy paper and ball up the papers. Example: 8
    • *** The teacher needs to make the exact number of papers as the students in the classroom. For example, if there are 20 students, the teacher needs 10 addition equation papers and 10 addition additions to the equations. (If there is an odd number of students in the classroom, the teacher needs to play the game with the students in order for papers to have a match.)
      Procedures/Activities: 

    Motivation/Introduction

    1. Teacher will read “Counting on Fall” by Lizann Flatt.

    Teaching/Learning Activities

    1. Students will play an interactive addition game.
    2. The teacher will say: Math can fall from anywhere, even the classroom!
    3. The teacher will ask all students to stand around the classroom.
    4. The teacher will pass around a basket of balled-up addition problems and answers to the addition problems- all balled up in the same basket. Each student will get one balled up paper.
    5. The teacher will explain that each balled-up paper is either an addition problem or answer to an addition problem.
    6. The teacher will instruct students to throw their balled-up paper in the classroom.
    7. The teacher will instruct students to walk around the classroom and pick-up one balled-up paper off the floor.
    8. The teacher will explain that the objective of the game is to find the matching addition equation or answer. There is only one person in the room that has the match.
    9. Once all the matches are completed. The teacher will allow the students to throw their paper, again, and continue the game.

    Closure

    1. As a closing activity, students can play any of the following online games:

    http://www.abcya.com/addition.htm

    http://www.multiplication.com/games/addition-games

    http://www.learninggamesforkids.com/math_addition_games.html


      Assessment  

    Assessment Strategies

    Informal Assessment:

    • Oral Assessment
    • Visual Assessment

    Acceleration:

    • Turn this game into a Subtraction Game: Teacher will write tally-marks and numbers on half-size copy paper and ball up the papers.
    • Turn this game into a Tally-Mark Game: Teacher will write tally-marks and numbers on half-size copy paper and ball up the papers. Turn this game into a Number Game: Teacher will draw visual representations of numbers and numbers on half-size copy paper and ball up the papers. Example: 5 pigs & #5
    • Student-made game: Once the children understand the game, the students will make addition equations and answers to the equations.

    Intervention:

    • Demonstrate the procedure over again as needed.
    • Students with learning disabilities will be provided a designated peer helper.
    • Students with learning disabilities will be provided paper and pencil for solving addition equations.
    • ELL students will be allowed more time to complete assignment. These students are also allowed to work with a partner.
    • ESL students will be provided a model, as well as visual aids. Students work will be modified as well as given extra time to complete tasks.

    View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.