ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Book Boxes: Analyzing Elements of a Story

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Jessica Dean
System: College/University
School: University of North Alabama
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33371

Title:

Book Boxes: Analyzing Elements of a Story

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson, students will listen to a read aloud and view a model of the project expected related to the first read aloud.  Students will then complete a group project based on a story read as a class. (This can be done as a read aloud or in literature circle groups.)  The books used in this particular activity are Bud, Not Buddy and The Watsons go to Birmingham.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
1 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RL.4.1]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information and make simple inference with and across texts, such as: definitions, facts, supporting details.
  • Make complex inferences within and across texts to describe problems and solution or cause and effect, determine unstated assumptions in and argument.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly stated reason for character's statement in a story. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret reason for character's statement and explain with support from story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize paraphrase of explicit details about a main character in a story. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize story detail related to main action. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize reason explicitly stated in a story. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize reason for character's action in a story (explicit). (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize description of character's action explicitly stated in a story. (Locate and Recall)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.1- Answer who, what, when, and where questions to demonstrate understanding of a story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
2 ) Determine a theme of a story, drama, or poem from details in the text; summarize the text. [RL.4.2]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Cognitive Target::
Make complex inferences within and across texts to integrate ideas to determine theme, identify or interpret a character's motivations and decisions, examine relations between theme and setting or characters.
NAEP Descriptor::
Integrate and interpret ideas to determine theme. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer and explain a lesson common to story and poem. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Provide an example from the story that reflects the theme. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize reason for plot resolution in a story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer and recognize main problem faced by a story character. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize how a paragraph supports the story theme. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use story events to support an opinion about story genre. (Critique and Evaluate)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.2- Identify the main idea of a story and retell the story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
35 ) Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace. [SL.4.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.35- Report on a topic or tell a story, including a beginning, middle, and end and including relevant facts or details.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 4
12) Use basic features of digital tools to communicate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use basic features of digital tools to communciate key ideas and details in a way that informs and/or persuades.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital tools
  • communicate
  • key ideas
  • informs
  • persuades
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • digital tools are available that enable them to inform others.
  • digital tools are available that enable them to persuade others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use basic features such as headings, text, and images to communicate key ideas that inform and/or persuade.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • digital tools can be used to communicate by informing and/or persuade others.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to represent, describe, and analyze elements of a story using pictures, words, and other artifacts.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Extension activity objectives: Students will use a Venn diagram to compare and contrast the story elements in two stories.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

The Watsons go to Birmingham by Christopher Paul Curtis (1 for teacher read aloud or class set if desired)

Bud, Not Buddy by Christopher Paul Curtis (1 for teacher read aloud or class set if desired) 

Shoe box (1 per group)

Rubric (1 per student); Allow students to preview rubric, so they understand the expectations of the project

Markers, crayons, glue, and other decoration materials for the shoe boxes

Graphic organizer with a table to include the item and rationale that is included in the box (1 per group)

Technology Resources Needed:

Students will require access to a computer lab, classroom computers, laptop cart, etc., in order to complete the presentation required for day 3 of the lesson.

Background/Preparation:

The books need to have been read aloud or as a literature circle activity prior to completing the book boxes.

It would be best if the Great Depression and the Civil Rights movement have been discussed prior to this lesson.

  Procedures/Activities: 
  1. (Day 1) The teacher will read aloud The Watson's Go to Birmingham to the students.
  2. (Day 1: 15-20 minutes) The teacher will explain to students that there are several elements to the story that make this story unique.  The teacher will explain to the students the objective of creating a book box.  It is important to help the students understand that the elements they choose to include will be different, but the rationale they provide will help to explain their thinking. The teacher will model an example of a book box for the students explaining the following:
    • The decorated outside (reason for decorations): The teacher should explain to students that the elements on the outside should include the title and other story elements such as the setting, characters, theme, etc.
    • Items included in the box and reasons for each item.  (Items can include words, pictures, artifacts, etc.)  The teacher should ask students to participate in explaining why each item would be in the box from the story.  The students' ability to represent elements of a story in an abstract fashion will help them internalize the meaning of each element in their own way.
  3. (Day 1: 10-15 minutes) Students will be divided into groups of 4 for the collaborative group project (see materials section for needed materials for each group).  Each student in the group will have a job (teachers may predetermine jobs): Be sure to explain each job's expectations before dividing students into groups to help clarify any questions.
    • Designer: leader of outside design and written rationale on graphic organizer.
    • Co-designer: assistant to the designer
    • Analyst; responsible for inside artifacts and written rationale on graphic organizer.
    • Co-analyst: assistant to the analyst
      *All students must participate in the group presentation to the class.
  4. (Day 1: 45-60 min) Students will work in their groups to design the box, fill it with artifacts to represent elements of the story, and complete the rationale graphic organizer.  Each group should have at least 3 elements represented on the outside of their box (one MUST be the title of the story) as well as 5-7 artifacts inside their box. 
  5. (Day 2: 30-45 minutes) Students will work together in the computer lab (or other available technology) to create a presentation using PowerPoint or Prezi to share with their peers.
  6. (Day 3: 45-60 minutes): Each group will present their boxes to the class.  Each member of the group must present a portion of their box to the class.


Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

*A rubric will be used to assess the groups' completion of the project.  The elements that are graded include:

- outside design (3-5 elements represented; one MUST be the title)

- outside elements rationale (3-5 elements explained on graphic organizer

- inside artifacts (5-7 elements represented:may include pictures, words, etc.)

- inside rationale (5-7 elements explained on graphic organizer)

Acceleration:

#1. Students will complete a graphic organizer to compare and contrast the elements of the two stories: Bud, Not Buddy and The Watsons go to Birmingham. (see attached Venn diagram).

#2: This activity can be completed individually using their AR books. This will help with differentiated instruction.

Intervention:

Students who are struggling with these objectives may complete the activity using a shorter passage or a book on their level.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.