ALEX Lesson Plan

     

The Other Side of the Fence: Point of View at the Zoo

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Samantha Frederick
System: College/University
School: University of North Alabama
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33391

Title:

The Other Side of the Fence: Point of View at the Zoo

Overview/Annotation:

This is a third grade English Language Arts project lesson focused on point of view using the zoo as a theme. The lesson includes a zoo field trip or virtual zoo field trip, class discussions, mini scrapbook point of view project, and a short presentation to the class. This lesson could be modified for upper or lower grade levels.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
6 ) Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters. [RL.3.6]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.3.6- Identify the narrator's or character's point of view in a story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
31 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 3 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.3.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.3.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., gaining the floor in respectful ways, listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.3.1b]

c. Ask questions to check understanding of information presented, stay on topic, and link their comments to the remarks of others. [SL.3.1c]

d. Explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.3.1d]

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

-The students will be able to distinguish their point of view from that of the animals and zoologists at the zoo.

-The students will be able to effectively discuss personal, animal, and zoologist points of view during class and small group discussions.

-The students will be able to write from their personal point of view, two different animal’s points of view, and the zoologist’s point of view to create a mini scrapbook to present to the class.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Greater than 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

-poster or paper for anchor chart

-different colored markers for anchor chart

-“The View At The Zoo” by Kathleen Bostrom

-teacher-created mini scrapbook project assignment sheet

-animal magazines

-scrap paper

-scissors

-stickers

-colored pens, pencils, markers, or crayons

-lined paper

-glue

-teacher-created project rubric

-arrangements for on-site zoo field trip if option chosen

Technology Resources Needed:

Options for virtual zoo field trip if chosen:

https://nationalzoo.si.edu/webcams

- http://www.teachertube.com/video/138836

 

-Computer

-Projector or SMART Board

Background/Preparation:

The teacher needs to be familiar with how to navigate the virtual field trip if the virtual field trip is used in the classroom instead of the on-site field trip. Arrangements need to be made previously for the on-site field trip if that option is chosen. The assignment sheet and rubric need to be prepared ahead of time. Animal magazines, stickers, and scrap paper need to be collected ahead of time. 

  Procedures/Activities: 

1. The teacher will lead the class in a class discussion to build an anchor chart on point of view focused on first-person and third-person points of view. Anchor chart could include:

Point of View

-The perspective from which a story or piece of text is written.

First-Person Narrator

-describes his or her thoughts and personal feelings

-key words to look for: I, me, my, or we

-example sentence: I was so excited to go to the zoo for our field trip with my class!

Second-Person Narrator

-describes how other character think or their feelings

-key words to look for: he, she, him, her, or they

-example sentence: The baby tiger was happy to play with the ball with her brother.

2.The teacher will read “The View At The Zoo” by Kathleen Bostrom to the class. The teacher will facilitate a student-led class discussion about the various points of view throughout the book using the point of view anchor chart from the previous step as a guide. Teacher facilitator question examples: How does (animal) feel about being awakened with a yelp? How does the zookeeper feel about the animals? If you were the (animal) what would you do, how would you feel? 

3.The teacher will explain the mini scrapbook project and provide project assignment sheet to the class. This assignment can be worked on in class across a couple of days, or started in class and finished at home over a couple of days. Mini scrapbook assignment sheet could include:

-You will create a mini point of view zoo scrapbook. Your scrapbook should include the following:

1. Cover page with name, date, and picture of yourself.

2. One page with a personal narrative from your point of view of the zoo. Written narrative must be at least one paragraph (five sentences) or more. You must include at least one picture or more from a zoo visitor’s point of view. The picture can be drawn, magazine clipping, or a real photograph.

3. Two pages from two different zoo animals’ points of view. Written narratives from each animal’s point of view must be at least one paragraph (five sentences) or more. You must include at least one picture or more from each animal’s point of view. The picture can be drawn, magazine clipping, or a real photograph.

4. One page from the zoologist’s/zookeeper’s point of view. Written narrative must be at least one paragraph (five sentences) or more. You must include at least one picture or more from a zoologist’s/zookeeper’s point of view. The picture can be drawn, magazine clipping, or a real photograph.

5. You will provide a short presentation of your scrapbook to the class. You will tell which animals you chose to write about and read at least one of your point of view narratives from your scrapbook.

-Be creative! Other decorations, borders, different colored pens, would be great to make your scrapbook stand out!

4.The class will go on an on-site or virtual field trip to the zoo. If on-site field trip, the students will be allowed to bring disposable cameras if they choose to take pictures for their scrapbooks. The teacher will ask questions throughout the zoo/virtual zoo concerning point of view. After the conclusion of the field trip or the following school day, the students will brainstorm ideas in small groups for their scrapbooks before beginning their project. Students will begin their projects in class and either complete in class over a couple of days or finish at home depending upon teacher preference. The teacher will have animal magazines, scrap paper, stickers, etc. available for students to use.

5.After completing their projects, the students will present their scrapbooks to the class. The teacher and class will discuss the various points of view mentioned and reiterate key words and definitions of first and third person points of view.


  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The teacher will use formative assessment to assess the students during class and small group discussions. The mini scrapbooks will be graded by the teacher using a rubric. The rubric could include three point levels:

Level three (three points each)

-Student includes cover page with name and picture of self.

-Student includes one page with at least five sentence point of view narrative from personal viewpoint with at least one picture.

-Student includes two different pages with at least five sentence point of view narrative from two different animals’ points of view with at least one picture each page.

-Student includes one page with at least five sentence point of view narrative from zoologist’s point of view with at least one picture.

-Student presents scrapbook to class reading at least one point of view narrative and choice of animals.

Level two (two points each)

-Students includes cover page with name.

-Student includes one page with at least three sentence point of view narrative from personal viewpoint with at least one picture.

- Student includes two pages with at least three sentence point of view narrative from two different animals’ points of view with at least one picture each page.

- Student includes one page with at least three sentence point of view narrative from zoologist’s point of view with at least one picture.

-Student presents scrapbook to class reading at least one point of view narrative.

Level one (one point each)

-Student does not provide cover page.

-Student includes one page with at least two sentence point of view narrative from personal viewpoint.

- Student includes two pages with at least two sentence point of view narrative from two different animals’ points of view.

- Student includes one page with at least two sentence point of view narrative from zoologist’s point of view.

-Student presents scrapbook to class without reading narrative. 

Acceleration:

The students could be given an assignment to extend the story “The View At The Zoo” by Kathleen Bostrom by choosing an animal or two that are not already in the book and writing from their point of view to extend the storyline and add a new ending. 

Intervention:

The teacher could work with students in small groups previous to this lesson introducing point of view through simple variations of fairy tales. The teacher could have the students retell the fairy tales from one character’s point of view.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.