ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Is the Big, Bad Wolf Really Big and Bad?

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Amy Parker
System: College/University
School: University of North Alabama
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33401

Title:

Is the Big, Bad Wolf Really Big and Bad?

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson compares and contrasts the traditional Three Little Pigs, by Golden Books to The True Story of the Three Little Pigs, by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. Students will discover how an author’s point of view can influence how a reader feels.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
3 ) Describe characters in a story (e.g., their traits, motivations, or feelings) and explain how their actions contribute to the sequence of events. [RL.3.3]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.3.3- Identify traits or feelings of a character in a story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
3 ) Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text (e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions). [RL.4.3]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across texts such as character traits, sequence of events or actions, setting, (identify) figurative language.
  • Consider text(s) critically to evaluate a character's motivations and decisions.

NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate and explain which story character is most important and provide specific info. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer character trait from story details to provide a description. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate character development using text support from beginning and end of a story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Identify and explain attitudes of two main characters. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use story events to support an opinion about a character's behavior. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Describe how main character's feelings change over the course of the story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer a story character's feelings to provide a description.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize reason for story character's action. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use story events to support an opinion about story genre. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate and recognize primary importance of a character to the story. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer and recognize main problem faced by a story character. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize the main way author presents information about a biographical character. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize description of character's action explicitly stated in a story. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret description to recognize how story character feels. (Integrate and Interpret)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.3- Describe and/or identify a character, a setting, or an event in a story.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
6 ) Compare and contrast the point of view from which different stories are narrated, including the difference between first- and third-person narrations. [RL.4.6]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 6: Assess how point of view or purpose shapes the content and style of a text.
Cognitive Target::
Consider text(s) critically to analyze the point of view used by the author.
NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate and explain which story character is most important and provide specific info. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer character trait from story details to provide a description. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate character development using text support from beginning and end of a story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Identify and explain attitudes of two main characters. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use story events to support an opinion about a character's behavior. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Describe how main character's feelings change over the course of the story. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer a story character's feelings to provide a description.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize reason for story character's action. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Use story events to support an opinion about story genre. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Evaluate and recognize primary importance of a character to the story. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Infer and recognize main problem faced by a story character. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize the main way author presents information about a biographical character. (Critique and Evaluate)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize description of character's action explicitly stated in a story. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret description to recognize how story character feels. (Integrate and Interpret)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.6- Identify first- and third-person narrations.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to compare and contrast the characters and events in two stories. Students will be able to describe how a narrator's point of view influences how events are described.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

  • The Three Little Pigs by Golden Books 

  • The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith

  • Chart paper

  • Markers for each student

  • Compare and contrast hand out for each student

  • Sticky notes for each student

Technology Resources Needed:

Background/Preparation:

Students will need to know that compare means to tell things that are alike, and contrast means to tell things that are different. Students will also need to be familiar with point of view and literary terms such as characters, setting, conflict, and resolution. Before the lesson, tape one piece of chart paper on each wall (4 total). Label each chart with one of the literary terms listed above.

  Procedures/Activities: 

1. Teacher will divide students into four small groups. Teacher will tell students to talk to their group about the following question. “In the story The Three Little Pigs, why is the wolf referred to as the “big, bad wolf”? Give students a couple minutes to discuss their answers.

2. Teacher will ask for a spokesperson from each group to stand up and discuss the answers their group shared.  Discuss all answers.

3. After discussion, tell students the big, bad wolf has sent you a video that he would like them to see. Play voki video. http://www.voki.com/pickup.php?scid=10029243&height=267&width=200

4. Next, read aloud the traditional Three Little Pigs by Golden Books, discussing the book and events as you read aloud. Ask students how they feel about the wolf as you read.

5. After reading, show students the labeled chart paper hanging around the room.  Review each literary term written on the charts (characters, setting, conflict, resolution).

6. Tell students they are going to carousel around the room in their small groups and write something on each chart. For example, one small group would start at the character chart. Each person in the group would write down a character’s name from the story on that chart. *Model if necessary. Every group should be at a different chart. Allow a few minutes for students to write, and then tell students to rotate to the left to the next chart. Keep rotating until every group has been to every chart.

7. Discuss what students wrote on the charts during their carousel.

8. Next, show students the cover of The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith. On a sticky note, have each student write down what he/she thinks will happen in this story.

9. Have students share their predictions with their small groups.

10. Read aloud The True Story of the Three Little Pigs by Jon Scieszka and Lane Smith, discussing the book and events as you read aloud. Stop every couple of pages allowing students to make predictions and respond to the text.

11. After reading the book, discuss the students’ sticky note predictions and determine if they were correct.

12. Ask students how they felt about the wolf during this story. Ask them how it is different than how they felt about the wolf in the traditional story.  Remind students that the author writes from a certain point of view so the reader feels a certain way. 

13. Next, draw a line on the charts around the room underneath the students’ answers about the traditional story. Have students carousel around the room again writing about The True Story of the Three Little Pigs this time.

14. Discuss the similarities and differences the students wrote about the two stories. Be sure to use the terms compare and contrast during discussion.

15. Give each student a compare and contrast handout (see attachment). Tell students they are going to compare and contrast the two stories, and they may use the charts around the room as a resource.

16. Read the directions aloud to students. Give students an example for questions 1 through 4. Walk around and assist students while they independently complete the handout. Students will turn in the handout when they are finished.

17. Students should be able to successfully compare and contrast following this lesson. Students should also possess a working knowledge of characters, setting, conflict, and resolution after this lesson. Teacher observation during class discussion and carousel activity should determine understanding. Teacher will also grade the handout to ensure understanding. See extension activity for a follow-up idea.

 



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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Teacher observation during class discussions and carousel will indicate student understanding of the concepts. Teacher will also grade the compare/contrast handout.

Acceleration:

The teacher can have students create their own version of The Three Little Pigs. Students can create a digital story of their version and then compare and contrast all three stories.

Intervention:

The teacher can work in a small group with struggling students after the lesson to ensure understanding.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.