ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Change of View: George C. Wallace

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Alabama Department of Archives and Hist
System: Informal Education Partner
School: Informal Education Partner
The event this resource created for:Alabama History Education Initiative
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33756

Title:

Change of View: George C. Wallace

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson will use primary sources to compare and contrast the perspectives of George C. Wallace at the beginning and in the latter part of his life as a political figure in Alabama. The students will develop a hypothesis about the effect that Wallace’s views and actions had on the image of Alabama and the changes in his character over time.

This lesson was created as a part of the Alabama History Education Initiative, funded by a generous grant from the Malone Family Foundation in 2009.

Author Information: Misty Freeman (Cohort 2: 2010-2011); Rehobeth Elementary; Houston County Schools; Dothan, AL

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
14 ) Analyze the modern Civil Rights Movement to determine the social, political, and economic impact on Alabama.

•  Recognizing important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy
•  Describing events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March
•  Explaining benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954
•  Using vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the social, political, and economic impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement on Alabama.
  • Describe the impact of important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Summarize the significance of key events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954.
  • Will identify the purpose and goals of education in American society and explain why African Americans chose to challenge segregated education in their quest for equality.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • analyze
  • interpret
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • protest (violent and non-violent)
  • boycott
  • sit-in
  • segregation
  • integration
  • Jim Crow
  • suffrage
  • rights
  • NAACP
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many of the key leaders that were vital to the modern Civil Rights movement including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • How the Montgomery Bus Boycott and other forms of protest impacted Alabama's economy.
  • How the many forms of non-violent protests were used to help African Americans in Alabama gain equality including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Selma-to-Montgomery March, and children's marches.
  • African Americans in Alabama were often the victims of violence while trying to gain equality (Sixteenth Street Church bombing, Freedom Riders bus bombing).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize important persons of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King, Jr.; George C. Wallace; Rosa Parks; Fred Shuttlesworth; John Lewis; Malcolm X; Thurgood Marshall; Hugo Black; and Ralph David Abernathy.
  • Describe events of the modern Civil Rights Movement, including the Montgomery Bus Boycott, the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing in Birmingham, the Freedom Riders bus bombing, and the Selma-to-Montgomery March.
  • Interpret primary sources such as the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, Brown versus Board of Education Supreme Court case of 1954, and Letters from the Birmingham Jail.
  • Use vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many individuals and events had a social, political, and economic impact on the people of Alabama during the modern Civil Rights Movement. There were many benefits of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Voting Rights Act of 1965, and Brown v. Board (1954).
  • The doctrine of separate but equal called for specific things.
  • These events also had a significant impact on the nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.14- Identify the purpose of the Civil Rights Movement; recognize important issues, leaders, and results of the movement.
SS.AAS.4.14a -Identify vocabulary associated with the modern Civil Rights Movement, including discrimination, prejudice, segregation, integration, suffrage, and rights.


Local/National Standards:

National Standards for History, 1996 Standards in History for Grades K-4 (p. 29) Topic 2, Standard 3 – The people, events, problems, and ideas that created the history of their state. 3D – The student understands the interactions among all these groups throughout the history of his or her state. 3E – The student understands the ideas that were significant in the development of the state and that helped to forge its unique identity.

Curriculum Standards for Social Studies, (Bulletin 111, 2010) Standard 5: Individuals, Groups, and Institutions (p. 78) Social studies programs should include experiences that provide for the study of interactions among individuals, groups, and institutions.

Primary Learning Objective(s):

• The student will compare and contrast different perspectives of George C. Wallace as a political figure in Alabama.

• The student will hypothesize how the image of Alabama was affected by Wallace’s views and actions. 

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 • The students will identify common character traits needed to be successful as a boxer and as a politician and how these qualities may change over time.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

31 to 60 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

• Cup

• Red strips of paper

• Blue strips of paper

• Enough pencils for the class

• T-chart and rubric (one for each student)

Technology Resources Needed:

• Computer

• LCD projector

• PowerPoint presentation: George C. Wallace: A Change of View

• PowerPoint (v. ’97-2003) – If you have a newer version, a viewer (free) may be downloaded from the internet.

Background/Preparation:

• The teacher should be familiar with the life of George C. Wallace. The Encyclopedia of Alabama has an article on George Wallace.

• George Wallace’s speech at the University of Alabama

http://digital.archives.alabama.gov/cdm4/item_viewer.php?CISOROOT=/voices&CISOPTR=20 50&CISOBOX=1&REC=6

• Background information about the White Citizens’ Council can be found at http://orig.jacksonsun.com/civilrights/sec2_citizencouncil.shtml

• Information about Wallace’s Stand in the Schoolhouse Door can be found at http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/face/Article.jsp?id=h-

• The students should have an understanding of the role of a governor in state government.

• The students should be familiar with Brown v Board of Education.

  Procedures/Activities: 

Engagement/Motivation Activity:

Before:

Start by placing red and blue strips of paper in a cup. Ask each student to select a strip of paper. Ask all of the students with blue slips to stand. Explain to the students that they are special and will each receive a brand new pencil. Pass out the pencils and note the expressions of the other students. Lead a class discussion on the fairness of the activity. Ask questions such as “Was it fair for me to give pencils only to the holders of blue slips? or How did you feel as a holder of a red slip when this happened?” Say, “As a holder of the red slips, you felt that you were treated unfairly. Now imagine how much greater would be your reaction to not being allowed to attend a certain school because of your race.” Explain, “As the leader in the classroom, I could have made a different decision concerning who got a pencil. Now we will study the decisions made by George Wallace while he was governor of Alabama.” Conclude the activity by giving holders of the red slips pencils.

During:

Step 1 Introduce and discuss the first three slides of the PowerPoint, George C. Wallace: A Change of View to provide students with an introduction to George C. Wallace.

Step 2 Show slide four, and ask students to discuss character traits that are needed by both a boxer and a governor. The teacher will list and display these common qualities as the students generate ideas.

Step 3 Show slide 5. Remind students that Wallace’s defense of school segregation would be in conflict with the Supreme Court ruling in Brown v Board of Education.

Step 4 Show slide six. Define words that students do not understand. Ask, “How was Wallace appealing to the segregationists who elected him? How was he challenging the federal government in this quote?”

Step 5 The teacher will then show slides seven and eight. Ask the students to describe the actions of Wallace as he stood at the school house door and how these actions reflected his views. Ask students to imagine how Vivian Malone and James Hood felt as they tried to register to attend the University of Alabama. Model the use of a t-chart by listing the student responses.

Step 6 Show slide nine. Ask, “What do you think would have caused George Wallace to change his views about segregation?”

Step 7 Show slides ten and eleven. Point out to students that Wallace began to reach out to the African American Alabamians and to actively seek the support of African American voters.

Step 8 Show slides twelve and thirteen. Ask students to compare the image shown on slide twelve to the image of Wallace in the schoolhouse door. Also ask students to compare the older Wallace with the images on slide three.

Step 9 Ask, “How do you think Wallace’s beliefs in the 1960s affected the image that people throughout the United States had of Alabama? Do you believe that Wallace’s change of heart changed the way Americans perceived Alabama? Why or why not?”

After:

Tell students to imagine they are an Alabama voter in 1982 when George Wallace ran for governor the third time.   Write a journal entry in which they decide whether they would vote for Wallace.  Why or why not? 



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The journal entry will be assessed using the attached rubric.

Acceleration:

Students will research the attempted assassination of George C. Wallace and discuss how this may have led to his changing views toward segregation.

Intervention:

The teacher may upload copies of the PowerPoint on class computers for students to view as they complete the journal entries or provide hand-outs of the PowerPoint to students.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.