ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Technology Timeline! Major Events and Battles of the American Revolution

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Kyrie Purdy
System: College/University
School: University of Alabama in Huntsville
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33761

Title:

Technology Timeline! Major Events and Battles of the American Revolution

Overview/Annotation:

The students will be able to identify certain major events and battle of the American Revolutionary War. Creativity and collaboration are included when making timelines. The students should understand that events happen in chronological order and they can be represented using a timeline.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
7 ) Determine causes and events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party.

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Determine the causes and events leading to the American Revolution, including the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Intolerable Acts, the Boston Massacre, and the Boston Tea Party.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • cause
  • effect
  • revolution
  • intolerable
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The effects of the French and Indian War.
  • The Stamp Act enraged the citizens of the colonies and was the origin of the phrase "No Taxation with Representation".
  • The Intolerable Acts were enacted to punish the Boston colonists for the Boston Tea Party.
  • The Boston Massacre was a result of conflict between the British soldiers and angry colonists.
  • The Boston Tea Party was the colonists' response to taxes on tea.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain why colonies were engaged in the French and Indian War.
  • Describe and evaluate how colonists reacted to the Stamp Act.
  • Describe the effects of the Intolerable Acts.
  • Describe the Boston Massacre and analyze colonists response to the Boston Massacre.
  • Describe the Boston Tea Party and examine the effects of this event.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The causes and effects of events that lead to the American Revolution.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.7a- Define revolution; recognize causes and events that led to the American Revolution including the Stamp Act and Boston Tea Party.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
8 ) Identify major events of the American Revolution, including the battles of Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, and Yorktown.

•  Describing principles contained in the Declaration of Independence
•  Explaining contributions of Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, George Washington, Haym Solomon, and supporters from other countries to the American Revolution
•  Explaining contributions of ordinary citizens, including African Americans and women, to the American Revolution
•  Describing efforts to mobilize support for the American Revolution by the Minutemen, Committees of Correspondence, First Continental Congress, Sons of Liberty, boycotts, and the Second Continental Congress
•  Locating on a map major battle sites of the American Revolution, including the battles of Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Recognizing reasons for colonial victory in the American Revolution
•  Explaining the effect of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the development of the United States
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify, describe, and evaluate major events of the American Revolution, including battles, as well as economic, political, and social actions and events.
  • Describe principles contained in the Declaration of Independence.
  • List, describe and evaluate contributions of major American and foreign supporters, ordinary citizens, and influential groups on the American Revolution.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • evaluate
  • contributions
  • principles
  • mobilize
  • Committees of Correspondence
  • Liberty
  • boycott
  • Continental Congress
  • ordinary citizens
  • American Revolution
  • declaration
  • financier
  • popular sovereignty
  • limited government
  • bicameral
  • unicameral
  • Great Compromise
  • Annapolis Convention
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The major events of the American Revolution as it relates to the battles and other events.
  • The principles contained in the Declaration of Independence.
  • The contributions of significant people and supporters of the American Revolution.
  • The contributions of African Americans, women, merchants and farmers.
  • The efforts used to gain support for the American Revolution by the Minutemen, Committees of Correspondence, First Continental Congress, Sons of Liberty, boycotts, and the Second Continental Congress.
  • The location on a map of major battles during the American Revolution.
  • The reasons for colonial victory in the American Revolution.
  • The effect of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the development of the United States.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify, describe, and evaluate events, individuals, and groups important in historic events.
  • Examine and interpret historic documents. Compare and contrast the contributions of significant people and events.
  • Identify the contribution ordinary people such as Haym Solomon.
  • Describe the contributions of Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and supporters from other countries to the American Revolution.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Through the events of the American Revolution and the contributions of many people, the United States gained independence from Great Britain.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.8- Identify why the people in the American colonies separated and declared independence from Great Britain and eventually became the United States; recognize at least one important factor contributing to American independence including key battles, influential leaders, and the efforts of ordinary men and women including the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown, George Washington, and the Minutemen.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • locate information from digital sources to answer research questions.
  • curate information to present or share with others.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • curate
  • keyword
  • search engine
  • database
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • information to research questions can be obtained from digital sources.
  • resources to organize information.
  • resources to present or share with others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a list of keywords or phrases to enter into a search engine and/or database such as Alabama Virtual Library.
  • use advanced search techniques to search by file type, dates, and specific domains.
  • organize information.
  • share information by creating a digital resource.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be located from a digital source to answer research questions.
  • information can be organzied and shared by creating a digital resource.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • infographic
  • student created website
  • organized information
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • information can be created and published in different ways to make it more useful, easier to understand, or relevant.
  • multiple ways to create and publish information.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • organize and publish information in different ways such as infographics, student
  • created websites, digital books, audio, video, etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be organized and published in different ways using images, text, inforgraphs, websites, digital books, etc.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
19) Conduct advanced keyword searches to produce valid, appropriate results and evaluate results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.

Examples: Search techniques, check for credibility and validity.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • conduct advanced keyword searches.
  • produce valid, appropriate search results.
  • evaluate search results for accuracy, relevance, and appropriateness.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • keyword
  • search
  • valid
  • true
  • accuracy/accurate
  • relevance/relevant
  • site/domain
  • file type
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to conduct advanced keyword searches.
  • how to evaluate the accuracy of information.
  • that not all information online is valid or true.
  • different sites or domains publish for different audiences.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • conduct advanced keyword searches using domain type such as '.edu', '.com', '.org', '.gov', file types, usage rights.
  • explain how they know information located online is valid or true.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • using advanced keywords while searching will deliver better results.
  • not all information online is valid or true.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

  • The students will understand that events happen in chronological order and they can be represented using a timeline.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

Time Not Specified

Materials and Resources:

Chart paper for students to fill out. Should be structured to ask about the event or battle: Which event or battle? When did it happen? What happened? Why? Who won (battles only)?

The Book George vs. George, The American Revolution as Seen From Both Sides By Rosalyn Schanzer

Technology Resources Needed:

Laptops or computer lab, required plug-ins for online timelines. The website utilized for making the technology timelines is www.tiki-toki.com

Background/Preparation:

  • Concepts to know

    • Boston Massacre: Fight in which the British fired into a crowd of and killed five colonists.
    • Boston Tea Party: A protest against the British about tea imported by the American colonies and colonists boarded British ships in Boston harbor and dumped the tea overboard.
    • Battles of Lexington and Concord: First shots fired between American and British troops.
    • Bunker Hill: A hill in Boston where a battle of the American Revolution happened, colonial forces surrounded Boston were removed by British troops.

  Procedures/Activities: 
  • Read pages 18-31 from George vs. George, The American Revolution as Seen From Both Sides. After reading using an interactive read-aloud strategy with them, ask them “When did the Boston Massacre actually occur?”
  • As students answer, write the correct date on the board and ask “What happened during the Boston Massacre? What caused the Boston Massacre to happen?”
  • Write a short synopsis of what happened during the Boston Massacre as students answer and write a short sentence explaining why.
  • Next, ask students about the Boston Tea Party: When was it, what happened, and why?
  • Write correct answers on the board.
  • Pass out paper timelines for students. Link the events on a timeline for students to see on the board! Show students this is how to make a timeline, the dates must go in order according to years and dates when they actually happened.
  • Make sure to highlight what correct spacing looks like on paper timelines. Put students in pairs of two and have them make their own quick timelines on paper (including the two events that we did as a class). Next, break students into groups of four.
  • Give each group one event to research on laptops or computer lab computers. Explain we are using events that happened before and during the American Revolution.
  • The list of events for groups:
    • The Stamp Act, The Townshend acts, Battles of Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, and Saratoga.
  • As students work, monitor to ensure adequate progress while answering questions.
  • When students finish have an accountable talk discussion. Ask students to build on one another when possible. Ask: “What would have happened if the Boston Massacre and the Boston tea Party never happened?” then next ask, “If these events never happened, would the Battles that came after have still happened?” “Why did the Battles of Lexington and Concord even happen? Bunker Hill? Saratoga? Yorktown?” “What was the most important thing that all these battles had in common?”


Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

  • The assessment that will be taken for a grade will be the virtual timelines made on tiki-toki.com. All events should be on the timeline with correct dates, definitions, and free of spelling errors.

Acceleration:

 

Intervention:

The timeline will allow the student to refer back to what was covered, Collaboration is involved so students who need extra assistance may continue to collaborate later.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.