ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Declaring Independence

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Kelly Watkins
System: Attalla City
School: Attalla Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 33834

Title:

Declaring Independence

Overview/Annotation:

Students will develop an understanding of the purpose of the Declaration of Independence by synthesizing the grievances listed by the founding fathers.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
4 ) Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative language such as metaphors and similes. [RL.5.4]

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
8 ) Identify major events of the American Revolution, including the battles of Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, and Yorktown.

•  Describing principles contained in the Declaration of Independence
•  Explaining contributions of Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, George Washington, Haym Solomon, and supporters from other countries to the American Revolution
•  Explaining contributions of ordinary citizens, including African Americans and women, to the American Revolution
•  Describing efforts to mobilize support for the American Revolution by the Minutemen, Committees of Correspondence, First Continental Congress, Sons of Liberty, boycotts, and the Second Continental Congress
•  Locating on a map major battle sites of the American Revolution, including the battles of Lexington and Concord, Bunker Hill, Saratoga, and Yorktown
•  Recognizing reasons for colonial victory in the American Revolution
•  Explaining the effect of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the development of the United States
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify, describe, and evaluate major events of the American Revolution, including battles, as well as economic, political, and social actions and events.
  • Describe principles contained in the Declaration of Independence.
  • List, describe and evaluate contributions of major American and foreign supporters, ordinary citizens, and influential groups on the American Revolution.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • evaluate
  • contributions
  • principles
  • mobilize
  • Committees of Correspondence
  • Liberty
  • boycott
  • Continental Congress
  • ordinary citizens
  • American Revolution
  • declaration
  • financier
  • popular sovereignty
  • limited government
  • bicameral
  • unicameral
  • Great Compromise
  • Annapolis Convention
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The major events of the American Revolution as it relates to the battles and other events.
  • The principles contained in the Declaration of Independence.
  • The contributions of significant people and supporters of the American Revolution.
  • The contributions of African Americans, women, merchants and farmers.
  • The efforts used to gain support for the American Revolution by the Minutemen, Committees of Correspondence, First Continental Congress, Sons of Liberty, boycotts, and the Second Continental Congress.
  • The location on a map of major battles during the American Revolution.
  • The reasons for colonial victory in the American Revolution.
  • The effect of the Treaty of Paris of 1783 on the development of the United States.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify, describe, and evaluate events, individuals, and groups important in historic events.
  • Examine and interpret historic documents. Compare and contrast the contributions of significant people and events.
  • Identify the contribution ordinary people such as Haym Solomon.
  • Describe the contributions of Thomas Jefferson, Samuel Adams, Paul Revere, Patrick Henry, Thomas Paine, George Washington, and supporters from other countries to the American Revolution.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Through the events of the American Revolution and the contributions of many people, the United States gained independence from Great Britain.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.8- Identify why the people in the American colonies separated and declared independence from Great Britain and eventually became the United States; recognize at least one important factor contributing to American independence including key battles, influential leaders, and the efforts of ordinary men and women including the Battles of Lexington and Concord, Saratoga, and Yorktown, George Washington, and the Minutemen.


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 5
17) Publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.

Examples: Infographic, student created website.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • publish organized information in different ways to make it more useful or relevant.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • infographic
  • student created website
  • organized information
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • information can be created and published in different ways to make it more useful, easier to understand, or relevant.
  • multiple ways to create and publish information.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • organize and publish information in different ways such as infographics, student
  • created websites, digital books, audio, video, etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be organized and published in different ways using images, text, inforgraphs, websites, digital books, etc.

Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to synthesize the grievances cited by colonists in the Declaration of Independence.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

31 to 60 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Internet ready computers for all students or groups, access to presentation software or web based presentation tool

For presenting, one computer attached to a projector, or classroom management software

Technology Resources Needed:

PowerPoint

Background/Preparation:

Students need to have an understanding of the events leading up to the American Revolution.

  Procedures/Activities: 

Introduce the Declaration of Independence to students by showing them a copy http://www.archives.gov/exhibits/charters/declaration_zoom_2.html.

Then, click on 'read transcript' and share with students an overview of what was being said in the two sections prior to the grievances but do not actually read the grievances. This will allow students to have an understanding of the purpose for the grievances.

Print out the attached complaints so that each group receives a complaint on a piece paper with room to write, highlight, and underline.

Provide small groups of 2-3 students with one of the grievances.

Each group begins to read and discuss the meaning of the grievance. One member of the group should record the group's thoughts. Students should underline or highlight any words or phrases that they are unsure of in order to look up in a dictionary. 

Students should begin creating a rough draft of their complaint in kid-friendly language. 

Students will then create a presentation that shares the original complaint and their "kid-friendly" version. The presentation could be created by using presentation software, web-based program, or poster. 

Student groups can share their presentations in a whole class setting or posted to a classroom management platform for students to view independently. 



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Rubric

Acceleration:

 

Intervention:

If students are struggling it is helpful to pull students together to share words or phrases and discuss the meanings of the words and phrases.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.