ALEX Lesson Plan

     

It's Elemental: 3-D Models of the Modern Periodic Table Elements

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Candice White
System: Montgomery County
School: Montgomery County Board Of Education
The event this resource created for:NASA
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34401

Title:

It's Elemental: 3-D Models of the Modern Periodic Table Elements

Overview/Annotation:

Students will construct 3-dimensional representations of each known element of the periodic table using cereal-sized boxes as their mediums. By creating these models, students will gain an in-depth understanding of their chosen element's discovery, history, unique properties, and place on the Modern Periodic Table. Students will also be able to identify and describe basic periodic trends.

This lesson was created as part of the 2016 NASA STEM Standards of Practice Project, a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 9-12
Physical Science
1 ) Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties and trends (e.g., reactivity of metals; types of bonds formed, including ionic, covalent, and polar covalent; numbers of bonds formed; reactions with oxygen) of main group elements based on the patterns of valence electrons in atoms.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Matter and Its Interactions
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict properties of main group elements based on patterns of valence electrons.
  • Use the periodic table as a model to predict the trends of main group elements based on patterns of valence electrons.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Periodic table
  • Valence electrons
  • Protons
  • Neutrons
  • Electrons
  • Family
  • Period
  • Covalent
  • Ionic
  • Oxidation number
  • Cations
  • Anions
  • Ions
  • Main group elements
  • Metal
  • Non-metal
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The periodic table orders elements horizontally by the number of protons in the atom's nucleus and places those with similar chemical properties in columns.
  • The repeating patterns of the periodic table reflect patterns of outer electron states.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify and describe of the main group elements.
  • Describe how the number of protons determines an elements place on the periodic table.
  • Predict patterns of behavior of an element based on its position on the Periodic Table.
  • Predict number and charges of stable ions formed from atoms in a compound.
  • Determine the number and type of bonds formed.
  • Predict numbers of protons, neutrons, and electrons based on periodic table information.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Students will understand how to propose an argument and defend their claim on electromagnetic radiation safety.
  • Non-ionizing radiation, such as those emitted in electronics.cannot cause immediate damage, but does interact with the body to potentially cause indirect damage, following long-term exposure.
  • Ionizing radiation, such as X-rays and gamma rays, can be hazardous.
AMSTI Resources:
ASIM Chemistry Module:
Periodic Table; Journey Into the Atom

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P12.3: In the Periodic Table, elements are arranged according to the number of protons (called the atomic number). This organization illustrates commonality and patterns of physical and chemical properties among the elements.

NAEP Statement::
P12.6: An atom's electron configuration, particularly of the outermost electrons, determines how the atom can interact with other atoms. The interactions between atoms that hold them together in molecules or between oppositely charged ions are called chemical bonds.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to describe unique properties of their chosen element.

Students will be able to determine historical importance of their element's place on the Periodic Table.

Students will be able to analyze basic periodic trends to determine their element's place on the Periodic Table.

Students will be able to construct a visually appealing 3-dimensional model of the periodic table displaying pertinent identifying information about the element they have chosen.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

 

Cardboard Box (size of a regular cereal box),

Construction Paper (and other colorful paper),

Scissors, 

Markers/Colored Pencils,

Decorative items (aluminum foil, pipe cleaners, colored pom-poms, beads, etc),

Item(s) that depict or represent your element in some way

Rulers

Stencils

 

 

Technology Resources Needed:

Background/Preparation:

Students must have a basic introductory knowledge of Mendeleev's Periodic Table, the definition of "periodicity", be able to differentiate between families (groups) and periods (rows) on the Periodic Table.

  Procedures/Activities: 

Teacher Resources 

Please see the attachment section for additional resources. 

*Genesis: Search For Origins Interactive Simulation Teachers Guide (see link in technology resources section) 

*Making Sense of the Elements (PDF document and see attachment section)

Also see Cosmic Chemistry: Understanding Elements

1. Students will compare the Modern Periodic Table to Mendeleev's Periodic Table and answer questions using the "Modern Periodic Table" Questions and Strategies sheet. (see attachment)

2. Students will utilize internet resources as well as the JLabs resource, "It's Elemental" to research pertinent information and facts about the element they have chosen.

*Students must locate the following information:

a. Name of element

a-1. Nickname(s) of element if applicable

a-2. How was the element named?

b. Who discovered the element, where AND when?

c. Uses of the element 

c-1. In every day life

c-2. In science

c-3. In space (if applicable)

d. The element's symbol, atomic number, and atomic mass

d-1. List the number of protons, neutrons, and electrons the element has

e. Group and period number

e-1. Identifying family (alkali, transition, noble gas, etc)

f. Why this element is placed where it is on the periodic table?

f-1. How is this element isolated (where is it most commonly found and in what form in nature)?

f-2. If it is not found in nature, how is it synthesized?

f-3. Note if anything has changed about the placement of this element on the periodic table

g. 2 Interesting facts about the element

 

Students will compile this information and then creatively and attractively display all of it onto the cereal box in the following order: Letters A, B, and D (front of box); Letters C and E (left side of box); Letter G (right side of box); Letter F (back of box). 

The back of the cereal box should contain a detailed color description of the element that includes the texture, color, state of matter at room temp, melting and boiling points. 

The front of the cereal box must include the item(s) that depict or represent the element.



Attachments:
**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The teacher will utilize the rubric below to assess the activity. 

Building A Structure : It's Elemental: 3-D Model of the Modern Periodic Table


      Teacher Name: 


       




    Student Name:     ________________________________________

 

CATEGORY

4

3

2

1

Points Earned

Front Panel of Box

Includes all required information: Name/nicknames of element; How the element was named; Who discovered the element (when and where); Element symbol, atomic number, and atomic mass; Number of protons, neutrons, and electrons of element

Missing 1-3 pieces of key information (1 out of each category: A, B, D)

Missing 4-5 pieces of key information.

Missing most of the required information. Little to no effort made to find/display the information.

 

Left Panel of Box

Includes all required information: Uses of the element (in everyday life and in science); Group/Period Number and Identifying Family

Missing 1 piece of key information (from either C or E).

Missing 2 pieces of key information.

Missing most of the required information. Little to no effort made to find/display the information.

 

Right Panel of Box

 

Includes all required information: 2 Interesting Facts about the element

Includes only 1 Interesting Fact about the element

No Interesting facts listed on the right panel of the box

 

Back Panel of Box

Includes all required information: Explain placement of element on the periodic table; Where and in what form is the element found in nature; If synthetic, how is it made; Has anything changed about the placement of the element?

Missing 1-2 pieces of key information from F

Missing 3-4 key pieces of information from F

Missing most of the required information. Little to no effort made to find/display the information.

 

Creativity

Product shows a large amount of creative thought.

Product shows some original thought.

Uses others' ideas, but there is some evidence of original thinking.

There is little evidence of original thought.

 

Attractiveness

Makes excellent use of color, fonts, graphics, etc. to enhance final product. Excellent use of elements of design.

Makes good use of color, fonts, graphics, etc. to enhance final product. Good use of elements of design.

Makes use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. The elements of good design are minimally used.

Use of font, color, graphics, effects, etc. but these often detract from the presentation content. The elements of good design are missing

 

Total Points

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Credit: http://rubistar.4teachers.org
Grading Rubric
Possible points: 23
A: 21-23
B: 19-20
C: 16-18
D: 14-15
F: <13

Acceleration:

Students may choose to extend on this lesson by "creating" their own unique element using what they know about periodic trends and element placement on the periodic table. The students would have to name the element, discuss its properties, and explain where and why the element would likely be placed in a certain area on the periodic table. The student may also design a 3-dimensional model of this element in the same fashion as mentioned above.

Intervention:

Students may utilize peer helpers to help them locate information on their chosen element. 

Student may utilize Resource and Inclusion Teachers as needed

Students may receive an extra class period to complete the assignment if necessary.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.