ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Solar Ovens

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Melissa Campbell
System: Fort Payne City
School: Williams Avenue Elementary School
The event this resource created for:ASTA
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34511

Title:

Solar Ovens

Overview/Annotation:

This investigation allows students to explore the real-life meaning of solar energy. Students designing and engineering a solar oven using a  pizza box. Completed projects will be tested and then evaluated for effectiveness.

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations; Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions; Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Energy
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by light.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by heat.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by electric currents.
  • Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways.
  • Provide evidence that heat can move from one object to another by conduction.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can absorb energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can reflect energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can conduct energy.
  • Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop for the electric current to pass through.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Construct
  • Transfer
  • Energy
  • Potential energy
  • Kinetic energy
  • Friction
  • Conduction
  • Absorb
  • Reflect
  • Circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Close circuit
  • Heat
  • Radiation
  • Convection
  • Collision
  • Motion
  • Electrical energy
  • Stored energy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat.
  • The transfer of energy, including the following:
    • Collisions between objects.
    • Light traveling from one place to another.
    • Electric currents producing motion, sound, heat, or light.
    • Sound traveling from one place to another.
    • Heat passing from one object to another.
    • Motion, sound, heat, and light causing a different type of energy to be observed after an interaction.
  • Heat is produced in many ways.
  • Heat can move via conduction.
  • The properties of different objects cause them to be able to absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Electric currents pass through a circuit.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Collaboratively plan and carry out an investigation that converts energy one form to another.
    • Identify the phenomenon.
    • Identify the evidence to address the purpose of the investigation.
    • Collect the data.
  • Construct an explanation using evidence about heat production.
  • Develop a model demonstrating that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Develop a model demonstrating electric circuits.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
  • Heat energy can be produced in many ways.
  • The properties of objects, e.g. ability to absorb, reflect, or conduct energy, relate to their function.
  • Electric energy can be transferred through circuits.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Energy and Waves

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.11: Electricity flowing through an electrical circuit produces magnetic effects in the wires. In an electrical circuit containing a battery, a bulb, and a bell, energy from the battery is transferred to the bulb and the bell, which in turn transfer the energy to their surroundings as light, sound, and heat (thermal energy).

NAEP Statement::
P4.2: Objects vary in the extent to which they absorb and reflect light and conduct heat (thermal energy) and electricity.

NAEP Statement::
P4.7: Heat (thermal energy), electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy.§

NAEP Statement::
P4.8: Heat (thermal energy) results when substances burn, when certain kinds of materials rub against each other, and when electricity flows though wires. Metals are good conductors of heat (thermal energy) and electricity. Increasing the temperature of any substance requires the addition of energy.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.2- Recognize different sources of heat; Identify materials that are conductors of heat, such as metals.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
4 ) Design, construct, and test a device that changes energy from one form to another (e.g., electric circuits converting electrical energy into motion, light, or sound energy; a passive solar heater converting light energy into heat energy).*

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Energy
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Given a problem to solve, students collaboratively design a device that converts energy from one form to another. In the design, students:
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • criteria
  • constraint
  • energy
  • device
  • convert
  • design
  • construct
  • kinetic
  • potential
  • transform
  • evidence
  • engineering design process
  • ask
  • imagine
  • plan
  • create
  • improve
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Energy can be transferred from place to place by electric currents.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use scientific knowledge to generate design solutions that convert energy from one form to another.
  • Describe the given criteria and constraints of the design, which include the following:
    • The initial and final forms of energy.
    • Describe how the solution functions to transfer energy from one form to another.
  • Evaluate potential solutions in terms of the desired features.
  • Modify the design solutions to make them more effective.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
  • Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones but are limited by available resources.

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.11: Electricity flowing through an electrical circuit produces magnetic effects in the wires. In an electrical circuit containing a battery, a bulb, and a bell, energy from the battery is transferred to the bulb and the bell, which in turn transfer the energy to their surroundings as light, sound, and heat (thermal energy).

NAEP Statement::
P4.7: Heat (thermal energy), electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy.§

NAEP Statement::
P4.8: Heat (thermal energy) results when substances burn, when certain kinds of materials rub against each other, and when electricity flows though wires. Metals are good conductors of heat (thermal energy) and electricity. Increasing the temperature of any substance requires the addition of energy.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.4- Identify common sources of energy used every day (e.g., electricity, gas, sun).


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will design, engineer, test, and evaluate a pizza box solar oven.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

For a class of 30-32 students, the teacher will need 32 ounces of chocolate chips, a 28-ounce box of graham crackers or animal crackers, and 32 plastic spoons.

Each group will need a cardboard pizza box, disposable bowl, thermometer, ruler, scissors, tape, and glue.

The building materials that each group has to choose from should include the following: aluminum foil, plastic wrap, string, rubber bands, construction paper in a variety of colors, and newspaper.

Each student will need a copy of the printables or their science journal, drawing or graph paper, a pencil, and crayons or colored pencils.

Technology Resources Needed:

Teacher computer with internet access and a viewing screen/board, student tablets

Website 1: Pizza Box Solar Oven Video

Website 2: Step by Step Solar Oven Directions with Photos

Website 3: Solar Cooking Video

Background/Preparation:

The teacher will need to organize donation of the cardboard pizza boxes and send home the supply request letter if desired. If unsure, the teacher will need to check school policy regarding use of food and any food allergies among the students. The teacher may also decide to measure out the chocolate chips ahead of time and place them in baggies for each group.

The students will need to be familiar with basic energy terms such as conduction, transfer, and solar energy. The students may build a class word bank before beginning the group projects if desired.

Check local weather to ensure the temperature is adequate for this investigation. 

  Procedures/Activities: 

1. Students will view and discuss the suggested website content.

Website 1: Pizza Box Solar Oven Video

Website 2: Step by Step Solar Oven Directions with Photos

Website 3: Solar Cooking Video

*To direct the discussion, questions like the following can be used: hat is solar energy?

 

  • What is solar energy?
  • Describe solar energy and include the word conduction in your description.
  • What is energy transfer and how is it accomplished?
  • How does a solar oven use the sun to cook/heat something?

 

2. Teacher will present the supplies list and explain the solar oven project. She will remind them that the content presented in step 1 were examples of ovens, and that they may follow the example or use the materials in a different way when constructing their ovens.

3. Students and teacher will review the safety plan before breaking into small groups.

4. Students will break into small groups to begin designing their solar oven. This should be completed on drawing or graph paper, and materials the group plan on using should be labeled in, or listed on, the drawing.

5. Students will construct their solar ovens, and once complete, draw a final diagram of the project.

6. Students will each get a spoonful of chocolate chips that they will place in their group's bowl before putting the bowl inside the solar oven.

7. Students will take their projects outside to a sunny area and leave the oven undisturbed for 30 minutes to one hour.

8. Students will open their ovens and observe the change to the chocolate chips. 

9. Students should discuss and record their observations. Students should include information about the change in energy form (solar to heat). This can be done in their science journals or diagrammed on the group's final drawing of their solar oven. During this time, the chocolate fondue may be enjoyed with a graham cracker.

10. To further evaluate understanding, the teacher may have students share their final drawings and diagrams. This can include evaluations of the effectiveness of their construction, and changes they might make to their projects if the activity was repeated.



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

1. The teacher will observe student discussion during the design and engineering process.

2. The teacher will evaluate student responses on the recording pages.

Acceleration:

1. Students will research facts about solar energy and prepare a keynote for their classmates.

2. The students will research a global problem and research how solar energy might alleviate the effects.

3. Students will photograph finished projects and use them to create a slideshow or an Educreations project.

Intervention:

1. Students will be given a peer buddy when constructing written responses.

2. Students will be given a word bank to help with the construction of written responses.

3. Students will view classmates' keynotes to aid in understanding and vocabulary acquisition. 


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.