ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Greeting Card Dissection

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Katie Busch
System: Informal Education Partner
School: Informal Education Partner
The event this resource created for:ASTA
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34574

Title:

Greeting Card Dissection

Overview/Annotation:

Engage students in testing their knowledge of circuits in this delightful dissection. Students will apply science practices and content knowledge while conducting hands-on and digital/print research and writing. The actual "dissection" does not take very long, but the writing components can be extended if desired. 

This lesson results from a collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.4.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.4.2b]

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). [W.4.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.4.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.4.2e]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.23- Compose informative or explanatory texts by stating a topic, providing facts or details, and providing an appropriate conclusion related to the topic.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
28 ) Conduct short research projects that build knowledge through investigation of different aspects of a topic. [W.4.7]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
32 ) Engage effectively in a range of collaborative discussions (one-on-one, in groups, and teacher-led) with diverse partners on Grade 4 topics and texts, building on others' ideas and expressing their own clearly. [SL.4.1]

a. Come to discussions prepared, having read or studied required material; explicitly draw on that preparation and other information known about the topic to explore ideas under discussion. [SL.4.1a]

b. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions and carry out assigned roles. [SL.4.1b]

c. Pose and respond to specific questions to clarify or follow up on information, and make comments that contribute to the discussion and link to the remarks of others. [SL.4.1c]

d. Review the key ideas expressed and explain their own ideas and understanding in light of the discussion. [SL.4.1d]

Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
2 ) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Planning and Carrying out Investigations; Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions; Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Energy
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by light.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by heat.
  • Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by electric currents.
  • Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways.
  • Provide evidence that heat can move from one object to another by conduction.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can absorb energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can reflect energy.
  • Demonstrate that different objects can conduct energy.
  • Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop for the electric current to pass through.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Construct
  • Transfer
  • Energy
  • Potential energy
  • Kinetic energy
  • Friction
  • Conduction
  • Absorb
  • Reflect
  • Circuit
  • Open circuit
  • Close circuit
  • Heat
  • Radiation
  • Convection
  • Collision
  • Motion
  • Electrical energy
  • Stored energy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Energy is present whenever there are moving objects, sound, light, or heat.
  • The transfer of energy, including the following:
    • Collisions between objects.
    • Light traveling from one place to another.
    • Electric currents producing motion, sound, heat, or light.
    • Sound traveling from one place to another.
    • Heat passing from one object to another.
    • Motion, sound, heat, and light causing a different type of energy to be observed after an interaction.
  • Heat is produced in many ways.
  • Heat can move via conduction.
  • The properties of different objects cause them to be able to absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Electric currents pass through a circuit.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Collaboratively plan and carry out an investigation that converts energy one form to another.
    • Identify the phenomenon.
    • Identify the evidence to address the purpose of the investigation.
    • Collect the data.
  • Construct an explanation using evidence about heat production.
  • Develop a model demonstrating that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.
  • Develop a model demonstrating electric circuits.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
  • Heat energy can be produced in many ways.
  • The properties of objects, e.g. ability to absorb, reflect, or conduct energy, relate to their function.
  • Electric energy can be transferred through circuits.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Energy and Waves

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.11: Electricity flowing through an electrical circuit produces magnetic effects in the wires. In an electrical circuit containing a battery, a bulb, and a bell, energy from the battery is transferred to the bulb and the bell, which in turn transfer the energy to their surroundings as light, sound, and heat (thermal energy).

NAEP Statement::
P4.2: Objects vary in the extent to which they absorb and reflect light and conduct heat (thermal energy) and electricity.

NAEP Statement::
P4.7: Heat (thermal energy), electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy.§

NAEP Statement::
P4.8: Heat (thermal energy) results when substances burn, when certain kinds of materials rub against each other, and when electricity flows though wires. Metals are good conductors of heat (thermal energy) and electricity. Increasing the temperature of any substance requires the addition of energy.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.2- Recognize different sources of heat; Identify materials that are conductors of heat, such as metals.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
4 ) Design, construct, and test a device that changes energy from one form to another (e.g., electric circuits converting electrical energy into motion, light, or sound energy; a passive solar heater converting light energy into heat energy).*

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Constructing Explanations and Designing Solutions
Crosscutting Concepts: Energy and Matter
Disciplinary Core Idea: Energy
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Given a problem to solve, students collaboratively design a device that converts energy from one form to another. In the design, students:
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • criteria
  • constraint
  • energy
  • device
  • convert
  • design
  • construct
  • kinetic
  • potential
  • transform
  • evidence
  • engineering design process
  • ask
  • imagine
  • plan
  • create
  • improve
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Energy can be transferred from place to place by electric currents.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use scientific knowledge to generate design solutions that convert energy from one form to another.
  • Describe the given criteria and constraints of the design, which include the following:
    • The initial and final forms of energy.
    • Describe how the solution functions to transfer energy from one form to another.
  • Evaluate potential solutions in terms of the desired features.
  • Modify the design solutions to make them more effective.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Energy can be transferred in various ways and between objects.
  • Engineers improve existing technologies or develop new ones but are limited by available resources.

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
P4.11: Electricity flowing through an electrical circuit produces magnetic effects in the wires. In an electrical circuit containing a battery, a bulb, and a bell, energy from the battery is transferred to the bulb and the bell, which in turn transfer the energy to their surroundings as light, sound, and heat (thermal energy).

NAEP Statement::
P4.7: Heat (thermal energy), electricity, light, and sound are forms of energy.§

NAEP Statement::
P4.8: Heat (thermal energy) results when substances burn, when certain kinds of materials rub against each other, and when electricity flows though wires. Metals are good conductors of heat (thermal energy) and electricity. Increasing the temperature of any substance requires the addition of energy.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.4.4- Identify common sources of energy used every day (e.g., electricity, gas, sun).


Local/National Standards:

NGSS

4-PS3-2. Make observations to provide evidence that energy can be transferred from place to place by sound, light, heat, and
electric currents. [Assessment Boundary: Assessment does not include quantitative measurements of energy.]

4-PS3-4. Apply scientific ideas to design, test, and refine a device that converts energy from one form to another.* [Clarification
Statement: Examples of devices could include electric circuits that convert electrical energy into motion energy of a vehicle, light, or sound; and, a passive solar heater
that converts light into heat. Examples of constraints could include the materials, cost, or time to design the device.] [Assessment Boundary: Devices should be limited
to those that convert motion energy to electric energy or use stored energy to cause motion or produce light or sound.]

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will identify common components of a circuit, even if they look different from the form the student is familiar with (e.g., different size and shape batteries, wires, lights).

Students will make predictions based on logical reasoning.

Students will write an informative piece explaining a procedure or findings of an investigation.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will apply what they know about circuits to a real-world context.

Students will also use logic and reasoning and practice some of their science and engineering skills while writing. 

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Greeting cards with lights and sound (They are about $8 each at Walmart so as many as you can afford/have donated--ideally students would work with partners but groups are okay too. A blow sensor or press here button is ideal but not required.)

1 greeting card that has a spinning/vibrating/other motorized component

Copy of greeting card dissection instructions per group

Copy of student dissection log per group

Technology Resources Needed:

Projecting images for students to be able to do research, take pictures, and for type their writing is preferred but not required.

Student devices are preferred but not required. 

Background/Preparation:

Students should already be familiar with circuits and switches.

  Procedures/Activities: 

1. Put students in as many groups as possible, depending on number of cards available.


2. Refer to the attached guide for detailed steps for the "dissection". Have students investigate their cards and figure out what they do (lights, sound) and how to make the card start and stop. Then have students list all of the components that they can and cannot see but can reason must be there. Help guide students to make the logical connections and do claims evidence reasoning.

Example: Claim: There is a speaker hidden in the card. Evidence: The card is making sound when activated. Reasoning: A plain card does not make sound. Music often comes out of speakers. If I can hear music or a sound coming from my card there must be a speaker producing the sound.
You can do the same for batteries and possibly a switch if students have a strong enough understanding of switches.

3. After they have made reasoned predictions, they can open up the card or you can do it for them. Safety considerations need to be taken into account with thick paper and potential for cuts on that paper or possibly components of the card.

4. Next students will look for and identify components. They will conduct research to figure out unknown components. You may give them new vocabulary to help or suggest terms to search for like "common circuit board" or "small battery".

5. Students will identify as much as they possibly can about the circuit and draw or photograph what they see.

6. Writing: Students should write an explanation of how the card works, a procedure for completing the circuit by activating the switch (including the transfer of energy through the card), a procedure for dissecting a greeting card, etc. 



Attachments:
**Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Claim evidence reasoning can be assessed for appropriate evidence and reasoning.

Logs can be assessed for identification and explanation of components.

Writing can be assessed for incorporation of research and clear explanation of how the card works/how it was examined. 

Acceleration:

A. Design a card: Using these or other circuits, students design their own greeting card. They could draw their own pictures or, if you have access to a color printer, some companies like Cannon and American Greetings offer printable cards so they could modify a non-electronic card.

B. Make predictions about a slightly different card with a motorized component. Can they reason out what must be inside of the card without dissecting it? 

Intervention:

If students are struggling they may need help thinking through the hidden components like if a light is lighting up, to what must it be connected? It may be helpful to have batteries, wires, and LEDs available for students to use to help them test their ideas or make connections. Sheets with pictures of familiar circuit components and vocabulary may be helpful, as well as pre-teaching some terms like dissection and component. 


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.