ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Is George Washington Living, Nonliving, or Dead?

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Debbie Elmore
System: Athens City
School: Athens City Board Of Education
The event this resource created for:ASTA
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 34639

Title:

Is George Washington Living, Nonliving, or Dead?

Overview/Annotation:

In this simplistic, introductory lesson in Life Science, students will converse with peers to prepare a list of seven common characteristics in organisms after determining if pictured items are living or nonliving. Students will use background knowledge and pictures to identify patterns that represent all living organisms. After watching a short video, students will separate living and nonliving things by coloring or drawing an outdoor environment.  Students will answer this question: Is George Washington Living, Nonliving, or Dead? as an Exit Ticket.

This lesson results from collaboration between the Alabama State Department of Education and ASTA.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
5 ) Obtain and combine information to describe that organisms are classified as living things, rather than nonliving things, based on their ability to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment.

Insight Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Obtain information from multiple sources and combine it to describe that organisms are classified as living things rather than nonliving things.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Organisms
  • Living things
  • Nonliving things
  • Growth
  • Resources
  • Reproduce
  • Stable conditions
  • Internal conditions
  • External environment
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Resources obtained and used by living things.
  • Organisms can be classified as living things based on the following: their ability to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment.
  • The life cycles of different organisms can look different, but all follow a pattern.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Obtain information from a variety of resources to describe organisms that are classified as living things, rather than nonliving things.
  • Combine information to describe that organisms are classified as living things, rather than nonliving things.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Patterns can be used when determining that organisms are living things.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Heredity and Diversity

NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L4.4: When the environment changes, some plants and animals survive and reproduce; others die or move to new locations.

NAEP Statement::
L4.5: Plants and animals have life cycles. Both plants and animals begin life and develop into adults, reproduce, and eventually die. The details of this life cycle are different for different organisms.

NAEP Statement::
L8.7: The number of organisms and populations an ecosystem can support depends on the biotic resources available and abiotic factors, such as quantity of light and water, range of temperatures, and soil composition.



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.3.5- Classify common objects as living, rather than nonliving, based on their ability to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and adapt to the environment.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

After completing this activity, students will be able to do the following:

  1. Differentiate organisms that are classified as living organisms rather than nonliving things.
  2. Evaluate the difference between nonliving and dead.
  3. Create a list to classify living organisms by seven common characteristics.
  4. Create by drawing and coloring an outdoor environment or color an existing scene to identify living organisms from non-living things.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

PowerPoint Presentation: "Is George Washington Living, Non-living, or Dead?"

YouTube Video: “Learn Grade 3 - Science - Living and Nonliving Things

Science Notebook/Journal

Pencil/Paper

Timer

Internet/Computer/ Projector

Crayons/Colored Pencils

Index cards (one per student)

Outdoor Environment Picture (see Attachment)

Teacher email address (optional)

Teacher may want to substitute pictures in PowerPoint to students in class or pictures of things around school.

Technology Resources Needed:

The teacher will need access to a computer and projector, in order to show the video and PowerPoint.  Students may use their technology devices to take notes and/or draw a picture, and/or email Exit Ticket answer. The teacher will need to provide an email address for students to send answer via email. If teachers use Google Classroom, the question may be uploaded so students can respond.

 

Background/Preparation:

For Teacher:  The teacher must be knowledgeable about the following:  seven common characteristics of living organisms, the difference between nonliving and dead. 

For Students:  This is an introductory lesson. Students need to use background knowledge to compare living organisms.  

  Procedures/Activities: 

Engage:  Begin with PowerPoint.

Slide 1:  This slide is just for teacher’s use and not for students.

Slide 2. Students will look at this picture and write a noun and two verbs to describe it.  Teacher may need to review the definition of a noun, verb, and rectangle with the class before beginning to write in journal. Allow students a couple of minutes to write his/her answers before they ‘Turn and Talk.’

Slide 3.   Students will look at this picture. Then, write one noun and one verb to describe it. Allow students a couple of minutes to write his/her answers before comparing thoughts and words with shoulder partner.  Draw a triangle around these two words.

Slide 4.  Students will look at the picture, and write a noun that describes it. Place a square around the word. Once everyone has completed this, the students will compare the words within their group.  

Slide 5. Students will look at the six words (within the rectangle, circle, and square) they have written to see if they can find something that all they have in common.  Students will discuss with group.  Teacher may want to have the groups give the words and the reasoning for choosing those words.  Teacher may have to review compare and contrast to make sure all students understand the assignment

Slide 6: Students will look at the three pictures again and decide on one word that describes all of them.  After group discussion, students will place a circle around the word and write what Part of Speech it represents.  Teacher: Let the students discuss within the groups the words to see if anyone can come up with “living” as the commonality. Don’t tell the students right or wrong at this point.  Students light up when they are part of presentation.

Slide 7: Students will observe three new pictures, and write one word to describe all three of them.  Students will place a circle around this word. Teacher may or may not want students to continue writing the words in their Science Journal. These pictures should be easier to identify if they knew that last group of pictures are living things.  Discuss with class to talk about non-living.  Make sure the students realize that the dead leaves are still in the living category.  Remember:  once living…always living, unless it changes form.  Example:  Tree = living; Cut down trees = living; Tree wood processed into lumber = manmade, nonliving.  As long as it stays in the same natural state, the cut tree will always be living.  Once man takes the wood and reforms, it will be man-made and is considered nonliving.  People who die are considered dead and remain in the living category.

Slide 8:  Students: The two circled words should be the same.  If not, discuss within your group only one word that would describe all six pictures.  Teacher will walk around to listen to each group’s conversation.

Slide 9: Students will look at three new pictures. Discuss within your group to decide on one word that could describe all of these pictures. Teacher: These should be easier after class discussion and if they knew that last group of pictures were living things.  Discuss with class to talk about nonliving. 

Slide 10: Students will draw a T-Chart and label one side “Living” and the other side “Nonliving.”  Students will create a list of living and nonliving things and place on the T-Chart.  Teacher:  Give the students 3 minutes to complete this chart in their science notebook. After 3 minutes, recognize the groups with the most words, the most creative words, and the most variety of words.  Clear up any misconceptions, especially dead items.

Explore:  Explore Alabama Standard #5 by concentrating on living things, “From Molecules to Organisms” by using “Structures and Processes.”

Slide 11:  Teacher:  Introduce Alabama Science Standard #5.  Tell the students that they will be exploring this standard to learn about our living world.

Slide 12:  Students will focus on the “Living” category of their T-Chart.

Within their groups, students will make a list of seven characteristics that all of these living organisms have in common.  Teacher: Set timer for 5 minutes.

Slide 13:  After 5 minutes, the teacher will make a list of seven common characteristics that the class agrees on.  Some items on this list may not be correct, but it will be corrected after students watch video.

Explain:  Teacher will make corrections to the class list of the characteristics that the students created to classify all living organisms.

Slide 14:  Teacher will explain the rest of Science Standard #5 to the students by reading it aloud.  As the teacher reads the standards, students should begin to correct list of seven living characteristics.

Slide 15:  Students will prepare to watch YouTube video, “Learn Grade 3 – Science – “Living and Non Living Things,” by making another T-Chart.  One column will be titled, Facts About Living Thing, and the other column will be titled, Questions I Still Have. 

Teacher: Show the YouTube video, “Living and Non Living Things.” Students will take notes from the video and place on the T-Chart.  If students have any questions that they would like to explore or research, they can add that to the chart, as well. 

Slide 16: Students will review the characteristics common to all living organisms and nonliving.

Elaborate/Extend: 

Slide 17: Students will identify the items on the handout by coloring only the living organisms.  If students prefer, they may choose to draw an outdoor environment.  Same instructions will apply.  Students will only color the living organisms.  Depending on time, students may need to complete this for homework.

Slide 18: Exit Ticket:  Students will answer the question, “Is George Washington living, nonliving, or dead?” by writing answer on an index card to turn in as they exit science. Teacher may choose to let students answer the question by emailing it or uploading to app or Google to teacher.



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

This lesson will be assessed based on correctly identifying living and nonliving things using the Outdoor Environment coloring and through Exit Ticket Question/Answer.  This assessment will give the teacher the insight to know if each student understands the characteristics of living and nonliving things.  (See Attachments)

Assessment: Students will identify the items on the handout by coloring only the living organisms.  If students prefer, they may choose to draw an outdoor environment.  Same instructions will apply.  Students will only color the living organisms.  Depending on time, students may need to complete this for homework.

Assessment: Exit Ticket: Students will answer the question, “Is George Washington living, nonliving, or dead?” by writing an answer on an index card to turn in as they exit science. The teacher may choose to let students answer the question by emailing it or uploading to app or Google to the teacher. The teacher will need to provide an email address for students to send answer via email. If teachers use Google Classroom, the question may be uploaded, and students can respond. Question: “Is George Washington living, nonliving, or dead?” Answer:  George Washington is dead; however, he is in the living category because ‘once living, always living’ unless form changes.

Acceleration:

Students may investigate an animal and organize a report to present it.  Grading Rubric included. (See Attachments.)

Students may read a book about any living organism. (See Attachments.)

Teachers may assign a Zoo persuasive writing prompt. (See Attachments for prompt and rubric.)

Intervention:

Students who need extra support may be assigned to a familiar partner who is sensitive and knowledgeable to the direct needs of that student.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.