ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Slavery: The Act of Buying, Selling, and Gifting Humans

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Harrow Strickland
System: Auburn City
School: Auburn City Board Of Education
The event this resource created for:Alabama Department of Archives and History
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35016

Title:

Slavery: The Act of Buying, Selling, and Gifting Humans

Overview/Annotation:

Through this lesson, students will explore primary sources related to the buying and selling of human beings for the purpose of slavery. Students will analyze receipts from stores and discuss what they demonstrate about modern society.  Students will then analyze the language and iconography used in bills of sale pertaining to the buying and selling of slaves in the 19th century. The students will write a paragraph to compare and contrast the items from both eras.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
12 ) Explain events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in a historical, scientific, or technical text, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text. [RI.4.3]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 3: Analyze how and why individuals, events, and ideas develop and interact over the course of a text.
Cognitive Target::
Identify textually explicit information within and across texts to find evidence in support of an argument.
NAEP Descriptor::
Describe a process with text support. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret information in expository passage to describe steps in a process. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize best description of character based on action described in expository passage. (Locate and Recall)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.12- Identify events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in an informational text.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
23 ) Write informative or explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly. [W.4.2]

a. Introduce a topic clearly and group related information in paragraphs and sections; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension. [W.4.2a]

b. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic. [W.4.2b]

c. Link ideas within categories of information using words and phrases (e.g., another, for example, also, because). [W.4.2c]

d. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic. [W.4.2d]

e. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented. [W.4.2e]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.23- Compose informative or explanatory texts by stating a topic, providing facts or details, and providing an appropriate conclusion related to the topic.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
30 ) Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research. [W.4.9]

a. Apply Grade 4 Reading standards to literature (e.g., "Describe in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text [e.g., a character's thoughts, words, or actions]"). [W.4.9a]

b. Apply Grade 4 Reading standards to informational texts (e.g., "Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text"). [W.4.9b]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.30- Identify evidence from literary or informational texts to support a research topic.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.
  • Describe major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • plantation
  • Yeoman
  • townspeople
  • inequity
  • agriculture
  • fertile
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • During this time, most families in Alabama did not own slaves; most slaves were owned by Plantation Owners.
  • Most of Alabama's families made a living through agriculture.
  • The Black Belt and fertile river valleys were major areas of agricultural production.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.
  • Describe major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were cultural, political, and economic inequities in Alabama in the early 19th Century between slaves, Yeoman farmers, and Plantation owners.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.6- Identify information about early nineteenth- century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.


Local/National Standards:

D2.His.2.3-5. Compare life in specific historical time periods to life today.

D2.His.6.3-5. Describe how people’s perspectives shaped the historical sources they created.

D2.His.10.3-5. Compare information provided by different historical sources about the past.

D2.His.13.3-5. Use information about a historical source, including the maker, date, place of origin, intended audience, and purpose to judge the extent to which the source is useful for studying a particular topic.

Primary Learning Objective(s):

The students will analyze primary sources from two eras to describe how African American people were viewed in 19th century Alabama. The students will write a paragraph to compare and contrast the primary sources from 19th century and modern era and to explain what they have learned about slavery.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

 
 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

 Secure the following materials (2-3 for each group)

  • Receipts from grocery stores, home improvement stores, etc.

Print the following materials- one for each group:

Print one for each student:

  • Analyzing and Comparing Historical and Modern Day Documents (see in attached materials)

 

Technology Resources Needed:

Computers and access to the internet if students publish to a website.

Printers

Background/Preparation:

Prior to this lesson, the students should be familiar with 19th century life in antebellum Alabama. They should understand how agriculture impacted the economy of Alabama. They should be familiar with the concept of enslaved people and how they were connected to agriculture and daily living in 19th century Alabama.

This link can be used to provide background information to students and teachers as needed. http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-2924

Students should have previous practice with writing paragraphs.

Plan to divide students into groups of 3-5. Prepare two folders for each group-one with the modern era primary sources and one with the 19th century era primary sources. Make every attempt to pair high and low reading level students together.

Plan an area of the classroom to chart student responses (white board, chart paper, etc.). Divide the area/chart paper into three columns: Ads/Receipts/Deeds or Wills

  Procedures/Activities: 

Before: Ask students to think about things they or their parents may have bought/purchased in the past. Distribute the "Analyzing and Comparing Historical and Modern Day Documents" worksheet to all students. Review the questions and format of the worksheet. Distribute the modern era folders to each group. Ask students to analyze the items and discuss what those sources tell them. Ask students to answer the questions on the "Analyzing and Comparing Historical and Modern Day Documents". Guide them to notice types of things purchased and uses for such items.

 

During:   Distribute the 19th century era folder to each group. Ask students to analyze the items and discuss what these sources tell them. Ask students to answer the questions on the "Analyzing and Comparing Historical and Modern Day Documents" worksheet. Bring the class back together and lead a class discussion to determine students' understanding of the items and to share their thoughts. Draw a Venn Diagram on the board/chart and guide students to compare and contrast the modern primary sources to the 19th century primary sources. Have students return to their seats and begin writing a paragraph describing how African American people were viewed in 19th century Alabama by comparing and contrasting the historical and modern day receipts. Encourage students to use the primary sources as text evidence in their paragraphs. The teacher may choose for students to type their essays to print or publish to a class website.

After: Allow time for students to share their paragraphs to the whole group or in peer groups. Discuss with students how the 19th century primary sources are reflective of other southern states in the nation at this time period. Ask students to share what the historical documents tell them about slavery.



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The students will be assessed informally through teacher observation during discussion of primary sources, their responses on the worksheet, and their paragraphs.

Acceleration:

As an extension, have students research the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Have them research the era these were created. Have them review the 19th century receipts and determine which and how many rights were denied 19th century enslaved people. Have them discuss why we have a need for such a document.

Suggested Reading List: From Slave Ship to Freedom Road by Julius Lester

Intervention:

Students who need extra assistance with analyzing the primary sources may need the following guiding questions: What do you notice first? What do you notice that you can’t explain?  Why do you think somebody made this?  What do you think was happening when this was made?  What can you learn from examining this?

 

Students who need extra assistance may require a graphic organizer with sentence stems to write their essays.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.