ALEX Lesson Plan

     

School Days: Early 19th Century in Alabama

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Melinda Staubs
Organization:Jacksonville State University
The event this resource created for:Alabama Department of Archives and History
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35065

Title:

School Days: Early 19th Century in Alabama

Overview/Annotation:

Students will explore an article about education in the early nineteenth century and a newspaper article from 1818 to determine what education was like in the early nineteenth century. Students will investigate the documents and find text evidence to find out what schools were like in the early nineteenth century. Students will use their findings to write a story.

This lesson was created in partnership with the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
10 ) Refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says explicitly and when drawing inferences from the text. [RI.4.1]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 1: Read closely to determine what the text says explicitly and to make logical inferences from it; cite specific textual evidence when writing or speaking to support conclusions drawn from the text.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information and make simple inference with and across texts, such as: definitions, facts, supporting details.
  • Make complex inferences within and across texts to describe problems and solution or cause and effect, determine unstated assumptions in and argument. Draw conclusions and provide supporting details.
  • Determine fact from opinion.
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across text, such as locating specific information in text or graphics. Make complex references within and across texts, such as draw conclusions and provide supporting information.

NAEP Descriptor::
Use examples from article to explain interpretation. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize main questions answered by an article. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Interpret text details to select and provide one example. (Integrate and Interpret)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly stated information from an article. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize explicitly stated information in an informational text. (Locate and Recall)

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize cause explicitly stated in an informational text. (Locate and Recall)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.10- Answer who, what, when, and where questions to demonstrate understanding of an informational text.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 4
11 ) Determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details; summarize the text. [RI.4.2]


NAEP Framework
Anchor Standard::
Anchor Standard 2: Determine central ideas or themes of a text and analyze their development; summarize the key supporting details and ideas.
Cognitive Target::
  • Identify textually explicit information within and across text, such as topic sentence or main idea, locate specific information in text or graphics.
  • Make complex references within and across texts, such as summarize major ideas.

NAEP Descriptor::
Recognize the main topic of informational article. (Integrate and Interpret)



Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.4.11- Identify the main idea of an informational text and details that support the main idea.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 4
Alabama Studies
6 ) Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.

Examples: cultural—housing, education, religion, recreation

economic—transportation, means of support

political—inequity of legal codes

•  Describing major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Alabama Studies (Alabama)
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.
  • Describe major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • plantation
  • Yeoman
  • townspeople
  • inequity
  • agriculture
  • fertile
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • During this time, most families in Alabama did not own slaves; most slaves were owned by Plantation Owners.
  • Most of Alabama's families made a living through agriculture.
  • The Black Belt and fertile river valleys were major areas of agricultural production.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast cultural, economic, and political aspects of the lifestyles of early nineteenth-century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.
  • Describe major areas of agricultural production in Alabama, including the Black Belt and fertile river valleys.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were cultural, political, and economic inequities in Alabama in the early 19th Century between slaves, Yeoman farmers, and Plantation owners.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.4.6- Identify information about early nineteenth- century farmers, plantation owners, slaves, and townspeople.


Local/National Standards:

NCSS National Standard II: Time, Continuity, and Change

NCSS National Standard III: People, Places, and Environments

NCTE/IRA Standard 3. Students apply a wide range of strategies to comprehend, interpret, evaluate, and appreciate texts. They draw on their prior experience, their interactions with other readers and writers, their knowledge of word meaning and of other texts, their word identification strategies, and their understanding of textual features.

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will describe education of the early nineteenth century.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will refer to details and examples in a text when explaining what the text says. Students will use text evidence to determine the main idea of a text and explain how it is supported by key details.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

61 to 90 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

  • Pencils
  • Sticky notes
  • Highlighters
  • Computers
  • Internet
  • Screen/white board

Attached materials:

  • Photograph of a nineteenth century school
  • Text Evidence Data Sheet
  • Alabama Schools in the Nineteenth Century handout
  • 1818 Newspaper Article
  • Education in the 19th Century Checklist
  • Education in the 19th Century Adapted Checklist
  • Education Venn Diagram

Technology Resources Needed:

  • Computers
  • Internet
  • Screen/white board (paper and pencil option in the event these resources are not available)

Background/Preparation:

Students should have a basic knowledge of the time period and have basic collaboration, reading, writing, and technology skills. 

The teacher should download the attached photograph of the nineteenth century school onto a computer to project during the exploration's engagement.  The teacher should create a large Venn diagram graphic organizer or display one on the whiteboard for use in the exploration phase (an appropriate Venn diagram handout is attached that can be used to project upon the screen).  The teacher should download the 1818 newspaper article (see attachment) to a computer to project on the screen during the lesson development (the 1818 newspaper article can also be downloaded on student computers if so desired). The teacher should bookmark the Storybird site https://storybird.com/educators/ on student computers to use for the expansion phase. The teacher will need to print copies of the Alabama Schools in the Nineteenth Century article, the Text Evidence Data Sheet, and the Education Venn Diagram for student use. 

Background information for teachers: Information concerning schooling in Alabama during the early nineteenth century can be found in the Encyclopedia of Alabama: http://www.encyclopediaofalabama.org/article/h-2599

  Procedures/Activities: 

Exploration: The teacher will engage the students by showing the photograph of the nineteenth century school and asking the students what they think is in the picture of and when the picture was taken. The teacher will clarify it is a picture of a school taken between 1830-1859.  The teacher will then state the day's social studies objective.

The teacher will refer to the Venn diagram graphic organizer and ask the students to think about what school is like now and what school may have been like in the early nineteenth century (1800s). The teacher will explain this assessment will tell what they think they already know about the day's objective, describing education of the early nineteenth century

While the students are thinking, the teacher will pair the students and pass out two sticky notes to the student partners. After the students have had time to think independently, they will share their ideas with their partners.  The teacher will have one partner from each partner group write one idea what school was like in the early nineteenth century and the other partner to write one idea what school is like today.  Students will post their completed sticky notes on either the Early Nineteenth Century side of the Venn diagram or the Today side of the Venn diagram. (The middle section of the Venn diagram will be completed together during the Lesson Development's closure). 

Lesson Development: The teacher will state the day's reading objectives and then tell the students they will be looking for text evidence of what schools were like in the early nineteenth century using two sources.  The teacher should pull up the 1818 newspaper article (previously downloaded onto the computer) to project on the screen/white board. The teacher will use this to model how to locate and highlight text evidence. Since the newspaper article has some unusual vocabulary, the teacher will read and discuss the 1818 newspaper article with the students and explain any unusual terms. The teacher will remind the students there is text evidence in the newspaper article and will model how to find and highlight text evidence and use it to answer what schools were like in the early nineteenth century.

After the teacher has modeled finding text evidence using the 1818 newspaper article, the teacher will pass out the Alabama Schools in the Nineteenth Century article, highlighters, and the Text Evidence Data Sheet to the peer partners. The teacher will demonstrate using the highlighter to highlight text evidence that supports an answer to what schools were like in the early nineteenth century and transferring a response to the Text Evidence Data Sheet based on what was highlighted.

Once the students understand what to do, the students will work with their partners to highlight on the article and list their answers on the Text Evidence handout. The teacher will explain this will serve as an assessment and tell what they already know about the day's objective, describing education of the early nineteenth century. The students will work with their partners while the teacher walks around and assists.  The teacher will discuss the students' findings after they have completed the Text Evidence Data Sheet.

Closure: The teacher and students will revisit the Exploration's Venn diagram to see what needs to be added or changed.  The teacher and students will complete the middle section of the Venn diagram as they discuss what similarities exist between education in the early nineteenth century and education today.  The teacher will briefly review education of the early nineteenth century townspeople and how finding text evidence is important when learning new information. 

Expansion: The teacher will explain to the students they are going to write a story pretending to be a fourth grade student in the early nineteenth century.  They need to include three facts about what education was like in that time period in their stories, which will meet the day's objective: describing education of the early nineteenth century. They should use their Text Evidence Data Sheets to help them write their stories and help them include details they learned.  

They can use the Storybird site, https://storybird.com/educators/, or pencil and paper to write their stories. Students can share their stories as time permits.  Early finishers can illustrate their stories. (Although a checklist is provided, the requirements for the story should be determined by the teacher taking into account the abilities of the individual students. A paragraph instead of a story can be substituted as an assessment.)



Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

All assessments listed below are directly tied to the learning objective: describing the education of the early nineteenth century as specifically outlined in the procedures and attached checklists. 

Exploration: Venn diagram sticky notes

Lesson Development: Text Evidence Data Sheet, Venn diagram

Expansion: Stories

Acceleration:

Suggested reading

Students can create a story having a student from the early nineteenth century meet a student from today, explaining what education is like in both time periods.  

Students can measure the cost of an education in the early nineteenth century using the prices provided in the 1818 newspaper article and the online measuring worth calculator: https://www.measuringworth.com/uscompare/

Students can find text evidence as they explore the online article, Life in the Early Nineteenth Century, http://www.localhistories.org/19thcenturychildren.html (The teacher should print the article and provide highlighters for students.)

Intervention:

Students will be placed within small groups and assisted by the teacher throughout the lesson as needed.  An adapted checklist for the story is provided. Students can complete the Education Venn Diagram (attached) instead of the story in the expansion phase.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.