ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Is My State at Risk for a Tornado?

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:elisa harris
System: Hartselle City
School: Hartselle City Board Of Education
And
Author:Stephanie Roden
System: Hartselle City
School: Crestline Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 35492

Title:

Is My State at Risk for a Tornado?

Overview/Annotation:

This is a third-grade math lesson on the topic of tornadoes and natural disasters. Students will enter data from an internet search on the number of tornadoes occurring in each state into a spreadsheet. Students will analyze and determine which states are the most active in tornado occurrences and create bar graphs and a scaled picture graph from the data collected. 

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
14 ) Collect information from a variety of sources to describe climates in different regions of the world.

Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Obtaining, Evaluating, and Communicating Information
Crosscutting Concepts: Patterns
Disciplinary Core Idea: Earth's Systems
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use books and other reliable media to gather information about climates in different regions of the world.
  • Evaluate the information in the resources to describe the climates in different regions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Evaluate
  • Climates
  • Regions
  • Reliable media
  • Sources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Climate describes a range of an area's typical weather conditions and the extent to which those condition change over the years.
  • Books and other reliable media provide information that can be used to describe climates in different regions of the world.
  • Variations in climates within different regions of the world.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify reliable resources for gathering information.
  • Identify the different regions of the world and their climates.
  • Evaluate information in the resources.
  • Use information to describe the climates in different regions and their patterns.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Patterns in climate can be used to make predictions about typical weather conditions in a region.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Weather and Climate

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.3.14- Identify differences in climate regions (e.g., desert, oceans).


Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • locate information from digital sources to answer research questions.
  • curate information to present or share with others.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • curate
  • keyword
  • search engine
  • database
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that information to research questions can be obtained from digital sources.
  • how to use resources to organize information.
  • how to use resources to present or share with others.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a list of keywords or phrases to enter into a search engine and/or database such as the Alabama Virtual Library.
  • use additional words or punctuation to narrow search such as AND (+), OR, NOT (
  • ), and quotation marks.
  • organize information.
  • share information by creating a digital resource.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • information can be located from a digital source to answer research questions.
  • information can be organzied and shared by creating a digital resource.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science
DLIT (2018)
Grade: 3
17) Describe examples of data sets or databases from everyday life.

Examples: Library catalogs, school records, telephone directories, or contact lists.

Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • describe examples of data sets or databases from everyday life.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • database
  • data set
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • examples of data sets.
  • examples of databases.
  • characteristics of data sets and databases.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • describe examples of databases from everyday life.
  • describe examples of data sets from everyday life.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • data sets and databases are part of everyday life.
  • data sets and databases are organized in a certain way for a certain purpose.
Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 3
16. For a given or collected set of data, create a scaled (one-to-many) picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.

a. Determine a simple probability from a context that includes a picture.

b. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled graphs.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students
  • Organize data and draw a scaled picture graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
  • Organize data and draw a scaled bar graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
  • Given a scaled picture graph or bar graph, solve one-And two-step problems using information presented in the graphs.
  • Determine simple probability from a context that includes a picture or information displayed in a graph.

  • Example: A picture graph displays data to represent the type of transportation for students traveling to school as 10 students walk, 8 students ride bikes, 38 ride the bus, and 12 ride in cars. Another student enrolls in school. What is the least likely way they will travel to school? Why?

    Note: Students are expected to reason about probability, not calculate a probability.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Data set
    • Scale
    • Picture graph
    • Scaled bar graph
    • Category
    • Probability
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Strategies for collecting, organizing, and recording data in picture graphs and bar graphs.
    • Describe and interpret data on picture and bar graphs.
    • Strategies for solving addition and subtraction one-And two-step problems.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Collect and categorize data to display graphically.
    • Draw a scaled picture graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
    • Draw a scaled bar graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
    • Determine simple probability from a context that includes a picture.
      Example: A bar graph displays data to represent students' favorite colors with data showing 4 students choose red, 11 students choose blue, 2 students choose green, and 4 students choose purple. If Jamal is a student in the class, what do you think his favorite color might be? Why?
    • Solve one-And two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled graphs.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data scaled pictographs and bar graphs.
    • Understand that logical reasoning and connections between representations provide justifications for solutions.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.3.16.1: Define picture graph, bar graph, and data.
    M.3.16.2: Interpret the data to solve problems.
    M.3.16.3: Identify the parts of a graph (x-axis, y-axis, title, key, equal intervals, labels).
    M.3.16.4: Locate the data on a picture graph and a bar graph.
    M.3.16.5: Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.
    M.3.16.6: Directly compare two objects, with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of" or "less of" the attribute, and describe the difference.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Describe picture graph and bar graph.
    • Use vocabulary related to comparing data.
      Examples: more than, less than, most, least, equal.
    • Recognize attributes of data displays.
    • Locate information on data displays.
    • Classify objects into given categories.
    • Sort the categories by count.
    • Recognize different types of data displays.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.3.16 Measure lengths of objects using non standard tools (paper clips). Limit to whole numbers.
    M.AAS.3.17 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication or assistive technology, represent and interpret data on a picture or bar graph when given a model or a graph to complete.


    Local/National Standards:

     

    Primary Learning Objective(s):

    The students will determine the number of tornadoes recorded for each state over the last five years.  

    The students will record the states and the number of tornadoes occurring from 2011 - 2015 into an electronic spreadsheet (such as Excel or Google Sheets).

    The students will calculate the average number of tornadoes during this time frame for each state.

    The students will rank states according to the average number of tornadoes (greatest to least) using the spreadsheet sorting options.

    The students will create bar graphs and picture graphs for the top ten states with the most tornadoes which will assist in interpreting data of tornado occurrences. 

     

    Additional Learning Objective(s):

     
     Preparation Information 

    Total Duration:

    61 to 90 Minutes

    Materials and Resources:

    Technology devices for students

    Science journal

    Ruler

    Calculator

    Graph Paper

    Pencils

    Crayons, colored pencils, or markers

    Poster board

    Technology Resources Needed:

    Chromebooks, iPad, Computers for research

    Spreadsheet program (Excel, Google Sheets, etc.)

    Printer

    Projector (teacher)

    Background/Preparation:

    The teacher should ensure that Lessons 1, 2, and 3 from this Tornadoes unit have been taught prior to this lesson. During the previous lessons, students have had direct instruction on creating a spreadsheet and creating a graph using spreadsheet programs. In addition, students have received direct math instruction on calculating averages, creating bar graphs, and picture graphs to represent data. Students have previously been taught how to sort data in a spreadsheet.

    The teacher may need to review with students how to use the calculator to calculate averages in order to check averages from the spreadsheet.

     

      Procedures/Activities: 

    Before the Activity:

    1.  The teacher will model how to use the calculator to compute averages.

    2.  The teacher will provide an example of a spreadsheet format for students to view. An example spreadsheet can be downloaded in the attachments section. 

    3.  Students will predict which state they think will have the most tornadoes in their science journal.  They will also predict where they believe their state (Alabama) will be ranked.  

    During the Activity:

    1.  Explain to students that tornadoes are possible in all of the 50 states.  

    2.  Students will work in pairs.

    3.  They will be reviewing information from the following two websites to record the number of tornadoes that have occurred in each state from 2011 - 2015.  

    http://www.ustornadoes.com/2016/04/06/annual-and-monthly-tornado-averages-across-the-united-states/

    https://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/climate-information/extreme-events/us-tornado-climatology

    4.  Students will create a new spreadsheet document following the sample spreadsheet format provided via teacher projector. A link to a spreadsheet template can be accessed using the attached document.

    5.  Students will enter data collected into the spreadsheet.

    6.  Students will enter a formula provided by the teacher to calculate the average number of tornadoes for each state into the seventh column of the spreadsheet.  

    7.  Students will sort the spreadsheet from greatest to smallest average.

    8.  Using the spreadsheet data, students will determine the top ten states with the highest average of tornado occurrences during the time frame.  

    9.  Students will create a bar graph and a picture graph for the top ten states using the poster board, graph paper, colored pencils, pencils, and rulers.

    10. Students will select the data for the top ten states and generate a bar graph using the spreadsheet program. 

    10.  Students will print the graphs.

    After the Lesson:

    1.  In their science journals, students will compare the graphs they created with the computer generated graphs. Were the graphs similar? If not, what was the problem?

    2. Students will address the following questions in their science journals: a) Did their data match their predictions about the state with the most tornadoes?  b)Was their prediction concerning their home state correct? Were they close to their predictions?



    Attachments:
    **Some files will display in a new window. Others will prompt you to download.
      Assessment  

    Assessment Strategies

    Formative Assessment:

    Science journal entries

    Summative Assessments:

    Group Posters created

    Digitally generated graphs

    Spreadsheets generated (correct information included)

    Acceleration:

    Students can conduct more internet research to gather 2016 tornado data.

    Students can look for geographic patterns in the top 10-12 states with most tornadoes.

    Students can create a tornado safety brochure for people in these high risk states.

    Intervention:

    Students who need intervention strategies:

    • may be paired with a student with advanced technology skills.
    • may be provided with a table of tornado data and asked to put these in order from greatest to least occurrence.

     

     


    View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.