ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Martin Luther King, Jr. for Early Elementary

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Amy Gandy
System: Muscle Shoals City
School: Howell Graves Preschool
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 4165

Title:

Martin Luther King, Jr. for Early Elementary

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson is an adaptation of a lesson in Character Education Made Easy. It helps early elementary students (especially kindergartners) learn about the influence of Martin Luther King, Jr., why he is remembered, and the problems he worked to change.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
1 ) Courage

Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
5 ) Fairness

Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
6 ) Respect for others

Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
9 ) Self-respect

Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
13 ) Tolerance

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: K
Living and Working Together in Family and Community
11 ) Identify symbols, customs, famous individuals, and celebrations representative of our state and nation. (Alabama)

Examples: symbols—United States flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle (Alabama)

customs—pledging allegiance to the United States flag, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner"

individuals—George Washington; Abraham Lincoln; Squanto; Martin Luther King, Jr.

celebrations—Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Recognize our country's important symbols and customs.
  • Identify famous national and state individuals.
  • Recognize the "Pledge of Allegiance" and "The Star Spangled Banner" and demonstrate appropriate etiquette for each.
  • Recognize the importance of various national and state holidays.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • symbol
  • custom
  • famous
  • celebrations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Our state and nation has certain symbols that represent it and its people.
  • There are certain customs common to citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are celebrations common to the citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are certain individuals who are widely recognized as representatives of our state and nation.
  • Vocabulary: symbol, custom, celebrate, celebration, represent, representative, state, nation, Alabama, United States, pledge, allegiance
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify various symbols of our state and nation, including the American flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle, etc.
  • Identify various customs of our state and nation, including reciting the "Pledge of Allegiance," singing the "Star Spangled Banner," etc.
  • Identify various famous individuals of our state and nation, including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., etc.
  • Identify various celebrations of our state and nation, including The Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are certain symbols, customs, celebrations, and famous individuals recognized by most citizens of our state and nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.K.11- Identify and recognize the symbols, customs, individuals, and celebrations for our state and nation.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
5 ) Identify historical events and celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Black History Month (Alabama)

•  Differentiating between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources
Example: fictional version of Pocahontas compared to an authentic historical account

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Black History Month).
  • Identify historical events within the understand fiction and nonfiction text about historical events within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Ruby Bridges).
  • Identify fact as information provided through primary and secondary sources.
  • Identify fiction as stories that are created and passed down through history that are not based on factual information from primary and secondary sources.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • differentiate
  • identify
  • fact
  • fiction
  • celebrations
  • historical events
  • primary sources
  • secondary sources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The importance of celebrations and events in the local. community and throughout Alabama.
  • The purpose of primary and secondary sources.
  • Techniques to differentiate between fact and fiction.
  • Vocabulary: fact, fiction, celebrations, historical events, primary sources, secondary sources
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify, discuss, and list celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Differentiate between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama such as the Selma Bridge Crossing, Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Black History Month.
  • Primary and secondary sources are an important way to differentiate between fact and fiction.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.1.5- Engage in class conversations about Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Black History Month.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will develop an awareness of the accomplishments of Martin Luther King, Jr. and how he worked to foster tolerance and respect for others.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will discuss the meaning of fairness. Students will discuss the meaning of self-respect. Students will discuss the meaning of courage.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

0 to 30 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

some type of candy (one piece for each child) picture of Martin Luther King, Jr.

Technology Resources Needed:

none

Background/Preparation:

Students should have already had the character education lessons on fairness, courage, and self-respect.

  Procedures/Activities: 
1.)Give half of the class a piece of candy.

2.)Tell those with candy to come near the front. Those without candy are to sit in the back.

3.)Tell those with candy they will get to play today. Those without candy do not.

4.)Ask students with candy how they feel. Ask one student with candy how they feel that their friend does not have candy and will not get to play with them.

5.)Ask students without candy how they feel.

6.)Ask students if they think this is fair.

7.)Tell students about the inequality of blacks and whites during Martin's lifetime. Discuss how African-Americans had to sit in the back of buses, drink from different water fountains, go to different schools, etc. Discuss whether this was fair.

8.)Have a student who did not get candy come and tell you how they feel and what they think you should do about it.

9.)Tell students that this took courage. Discuss how Martin felt about his people. Discuss how he had a lot of courage to come forward and tell about his feelings.

10.)Give all the children who do not have candy a piece. Tell the children that after Martin and many others stood up for themselves and worked peacefully to change the unfair laws that everyone became more equal.

11.)Eat the candy!!! Read Young Martin Luther King, Jr.: "I Have a Dream" (First-Start Biographies) by Joanne Mattern, or Happy Birthday, Martin Luther King by Jean Marzollo, the reinforce to class discussion.

12.)After eating the candy, sing "The More We Get Together". Several of the Greg and Steve music collections have appropriate songs: We All Live Together, Vol. 1, "We All Live Together," Holidays and Special Times, "A Man Named King," and We All Live Together, Vol. 2, "The World is a Rainbow," are good ones.

  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

The teacher will listen to the children's discussion for assessment of understanding.
Students may also be asked to write (or draw) in journals about how they would feel if they were Martin.

Acceleration:

The lesson could be extended by reading and discussing additional books or viewing videos on Martin Luther King, Jr.

Intervention:

Students who need extra assistance could have the concepts explained one on one by the teacher.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.