ALEX Lesson Plan

     

President's Day for Special Education/Early Elementary

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Charles Clemmons
System: Cullman County
School: Cullman Child Development Center
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 4702

Title:

President's Day for Special Education/Early Elementary

Overview/Annotation:

This lesson helps special education/early elementary students learn about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln and discuss how each demonstrated the character trait of honesty.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
Character Education
CE (1995)
Grade: K-12
4 ) Honesty

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
25 ) Write informative or explanatory texts in which they name a topic, supply some facts about the topic, and provide some sense of closure. [W.1.2]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.25- With prompting and support, compose informative or explanatory text by stating a topic and providing supporting facts and details, including some sense of closure.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
31 ) Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about Grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups. [SL.1.1]

a. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion). [SL.1.1a]

b. Build on others' talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges. [SL.1.1b]

c. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion. [SL.1.1c]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
32 ) Ask and answer questions about key details in a text read aloud or information presented orally or through other media. [SL.1.2]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.32- Ask and/or answer questions about a text read aloud.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
33 ) Ask and answer questions about what a speaker says in order to gather additional information or clarify something that is not understood. [SL.1.3]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.33- Ask and/or answer questions about information presented orally.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
34 ) Describe people, places, things, and events with relevant details, expressing ideas and feelings clearly. [SL.1.4]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.1.34- Describe familiar people, places, things, and events when communicating.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 1
36 ) Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation. (See Grade 1 Language standard 37 for specific expectations.) [SL.1.6]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
28 ) Recall information from experiences or gather information from provided sources to answer a question. [W.2.8]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.2.28- Recall experiences to answer a question.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
34 ) Produce complete sentences when appropriate to task and situation in order to provide requested detail or clarification. (See Grade 2 Language standards 35 and 37 for specific expectations.) [SL.2.6]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 2
36 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.2.2]

a. Capitalize holidays, product names, and geographic names. [L.2.2a]

b. Use commas in greetings and closings of letters. [L.2.2b]

c. Use an apostrophe to form contractions and frequently occurring possessives. [L.2.2c]

d. Generalize learned spelling patterns when writing words (e.g., cage → badge; boy → boil). [L.2.2d]

e. Form uppercase and lowercase letters in cursive. (Alabama)

f. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. [L.2.2e]

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: K
Living and Working Together in Family and Community
11 ) Identify symbols, customs, famous individuals, and celebrations representative of our state and nation. (Alabama)

Examples: symbols—United States flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle (Alabama)

customs—pledging allegiance to the United States flag, singing "The Star-Spangled Banner"

individuals—George Washington; Abraham Lincoln; Squanto; Martin Luther King, Jr.

celebrations—Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Recognize our country's important symbols and customs.
  • Identify famous national and state individuals.
  • Recognize the "Pledge of Allegiance" and "The Star Spangled Banner" and demonstrate appropriate etiquette for each.
  • Recognize the importance of various national and state holidays.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • symbol
  • custom
  • famous
  • celebrations
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Our state and nation has certain symbols that represent it and its people.
  • There are certain customs common to citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are celebrations common to the citizens of our state and nation.
  • There are certain individuals who are widely recognized as representatives of our state and nation.
  • Vocabulary: symbol, custom, celebrate, celebration, represent, representative, state, nation, Alabama, United States, pledge, allegiance
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify various symbols of our state and nation, including the American flag, Alabama flag, bald eagle, etc.
  • Identify various customs of our state and nation, including reciting the "Pledge of Allegiance," singing the "Star Spangled Banner," etc.
  • Identify various famous individuals of our state and nation, including George Washington, Abraham Lincoln, Martin Luther King Jr., etc.
  • Identify various celebrations of our state and nation, including The Fourth of July, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, etc.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are certain symbols, customs, celebrations, and famous individuals recognized by most citizens of our state and nation.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.K.11- Identify and recognize the symbols, customs, individuals, and celebrations for our state and nation.


Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 2
Living and Working Together in State and Nation
2 ) Identify national historical figures and celebrations that exemplify fundamental democratic values, including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.

•  Recognizing our country's founding fathers, including George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Benjamin Franklin, Patrick Henry, John Adams, John Hancock, and James Madison
•  Recognizing historical female figures, including Abigail Adams, Dolley Madison, Harriet Tubman, and Harriet Beecher Stowe
•  Describing the significance of national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day
•  Describing the history of American symbols and monuments
Examples: Liberty Bell, Statue of Liberty, bald eagle, United States flag, Washington Monument, Lincoln Memorial

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in State and Nation
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify national historic figures, including the founding fathers and other historic male and female American's, and relate them to the democratic values each exemplifies.
  • Describe national celebrations, including their significance and democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • historic figures (male and female)
  • celebrations
  • exemplify
  • democratic values
  • recognize
  • founding fathers
  • significance
  • national holidays
  • American symbols
  • monuments
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Fundamental democratic values including equality, justice, and responsibility for the common good.
  • The names and significance of national historic figures, both male and female.
  • The significance of national holidays and the relationship of each to democratic values.
  • The history and significance of American symbols and monuments.
  • Vocabulary: democratic values, equality, justice, responsibility, common good, founding father, national holiday, American symbol, monument
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify national historic figures and celebrations.
  • Identify the ways historic figures and celebrations exemplify fundamental democratic values.
  • Recognize our country's founding fathers and other historic male figures.
  • Recognize historic female figures.
  • Describe national holidays, including the significance of each and the democratic values associated with each.
  • Identify American symbols and monuments and describe the history and significance of each.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is an importance and impact of national historic figures and celebrations.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.2.2- Describe the significant national holidays, including the birthday of Martin Luther King, Jr.; Presidents' Day; Memorial Day; the Fourth of July; Veterans Day; and Thanksgiving Day.


Local/National Standards:

 

Primary Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to write basic facts about George Washington and Abraham Lincoln and give examples of ways each demonstrated the character trait of honesty.

Additional Learning Objective(s):

Students will be able to identify words and terms about each president. Students will be able to draw pictures and write sentences and/or a paragraph about each president. Students will be able to discuss the meaning of honesty.

 Preparation Information 

Total Duration:

91 to 120 Minutes

Materials and Resources:

Pictures/graphics/videos of Abraham Lincoln and George Washington, construction paper, glue, scissors, stapler for pop-up books and pocket books, a variety of activity sheets (word search, puzzles, color sheets, etc.), transparency of graphic from Light in the Attic, a variety of graphic organizers

Technology Resources Needed:

Television/VCR for videos, overhead projector

Background/Preparation:

This could be the first time students have used graphic organizers/thinksheets or they could be very familiar with them.

  Procedures/Activities: 
1.)Ask students, "Has anyone ever told you something that was not true?"

2.)Have students share experiences. Discuss consequences of lying.

3.)Show transparency of graphic while reading "Sick" from "A Light in the Attic" by Shel Silverstein and discuss with students.

4.)Read available classroom and/or library book(s) about Abraham Lincoln (see attached bibliography). Use graphic organizer/thinksheet to list essential details of book(s). Use overhead projector or provide students a copy of the organizer/thinksheet, depending on the ability level of students.

5.)Use graphic organizer to list words and terms about Abraham Lincoln.

6.)Depending on ability level, have students complete graphic organizer/thinksheets by drawing pictures of Abraham Lincoln (stress drawing a picture that represents the words and terms listed on the thinksheet)and/or composing sentences.

7.)Discuss with students how Abraham Lincoln showed the character trait of honesty.

8.)Ask students if anyone has had a similar experience and share with group. Compare/contrast experiences using graphic organizer/thinksheet.

9.)Read available classroom and library books about George Washington (see attached bibliography). Use graphic organizers/thinksheets to list essential details of book(s). Use overhead projector or provide students a copy of the organizer/thinksheet, depending on the ability level of students.

10.)Use graphic organizers/thinksheets to list words and terms about George Washington.

11.)Depending on ability level, have students complete graphic organizer/thinksheets by drawing pictures of George Washington (stress drawing a picture that represents the words and terms listed on the thinksheet)and/or composing sentences.)

12.)Discuss with students how George Washington showed the character trait of honesty.

13.)Ask students if anyone has had a similar experience and share with group. Compare/contrast these experiences using graphic organizer/thinksheet.

14.)Use graphic organizer/thinksheet to compare Lincoln and Washington in 3 areas: appearance, education and background.

15.)Students will choose to complete one of the following: a. Make a pop-up book about honesty (graphics and form provided by teacher) b. Make a pocket book about honesty (graphics and form provided by teacher)

16.)Students will work with teacher to refine projects.

17.)Students will share their completed projects with classmates.


Attachments:
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  Assessment  

Assessment Strategies

Teacher will listen to students' discussion for assessment of student understanding. Teacher will use rubric to evaluate student thinksheets. Students' projects will be used to assess student understanding.

Acceleration:

This lesson could be extended by completing a variety of activity sheets, reading additional books and/or watching videos about Abraham Lincoln and George Washington.

Intervention:

Students who need extra help will be assisted individually by the teacher.


View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.