ALEX Lesson Plan

     

Inch by Inch

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  This lesson provided by:  
Author:Linda Ponder
System: Shelby County
School: Inverness Elementary School
  General Lesson Information  
Lesson Plan ID: 5101

Title:

Inch by Inch

Overview/Annotation:

In this lesson students will do a variety of learning activities while they meet many math, science, and language arts objectives. Students will measure items, analyze and record data, listen to instructions, and follow directions. They will also follow a recipe to make a creative dessert.

 Associated Standards and Objectives 
Content Standard(s):
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
24 ) Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, descriptive details, and clear event sequences. [W.3.3]

a. Establish a situation and introduce a narrator, characters, or both; organize an event sequence that unfolds naturally. [W.3.3a]

b. Use dialogue and descriptions of actions, thoughts, and feelings to develop experiences and events or show the response of characters to situations. [W.3.3b]

c. Use temporal words and phrases to signal event order. [W.3.3c]

d. Provide a sense of closure. [W.3.3d]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.3.24- Compose narrative texts by introducing characters or a narrator, organizing events in sequence, and providing an ending related to the event sequence.


English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 3
38 ) Demonstrate command of the conventions of Standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing. [L.3.2]

a. Capitalize appropriate words in titles. [L.3.2a]

b. Use commas in addresses. [L.3.2b]

c. Use commas and quotation marks in dialogue. [L.3.2c]

d. Form and use possessives. [L.3.2d]

e. Use conventional spelling for high-frequency and other studied words and for adding suffixes to base words (e.g., sitting, smiled, cries, happiness). [L.3.2e]

f. Use spelling patterns and generalizations (e.g., word families, position-based spellings, syllable patterns, ending rules, meaningful word parts) in writing words. [L.3.2f]

g. Write legibily in cursive. (Alabama)

h. Consult reference materials, including beginning dictionaries, as needed to check and correct spellings. [L.3.2g]


Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
ELA.AAS.3.38- Use a capital letter at the beginning of a first name.
ELA.AAS.3.38a- Use a capital letter at the beginning of a sentence.
ELA.AAS.3.38b- Use punctuation at the end of a sentence.
ELA.AAS.3.38e- Correctly spell high frequency words.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 3
16. For a given or collected set of data, create a scaled (one-to-many) picture graph and scaled bar graph to represent a data set with several categories.

a. Determine a simple probability from a context that includes a picture.

b. Solve one- and two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled graphs.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students
  • Organize data and draw a scaled picture graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
  • Organize data and draw a scaled bar graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
  • Given a scaled picture graph or bar graph, solve one-And two-step problems using information presented in the graphs.
  • Determine simple probability from a context that includes a picture or information displayed in a graph.

  • Example: A picture graph displays data to represent the type of transportation for students traveling to school as 10 students walk, 8 students ride bikes, 38 ride the bus, and 12 ride in cars. Another student enrolls in school. What is the least likely way they will travel to school? Why?

    Note: Students are expected to reason about probability, not calculate a probability.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Data set
    • Scale
    • Picture graph
    • Scaled bar graph
    • Category
    • Probability
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Strategies for collecting, organizing, and recording data in picture graphs and bar graphs.
    • Describe and interpret data on picture and bar graphs.
    • Strategies for solving addition and subtraction one-And two-step problems.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Collect and categorize data to display graphically.
    • Draw a scaled picture graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
    • Draw a scaled bar graph (with scales other than 1) to represent a data set with several categories.
    • Determine simple probability from a context that includes a picture.
      Example: A bar graph displays data to represent students' favorite colors with data showing 4 students choose red, 11 students choose blue, 2 students choose green, and 4 students choose purple. If Jamal is a student in the class, what do you think his favorite color might be? Why?
    • Solve one-And two-step "how many more" and "how many less" problems using information presented in scaled graphs.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data scaled pictographs and bar graphs.
    • Understand that logical reasoning and connections between representations provide justifications for solutions.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.3.16.1: Define picture graph, bar graph, and data.
    M.3.16.2: Interpret the data to solve problems.
    M.3.16.3: Identify the parts of a graph (x-axis, y-axis, title, key, equal intervals, labels).
    M.3.16.4: Locate the data on a picture graph and a bar graph.
    M.3.16.5: Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories; ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, and how many more or less are in one category than in another.
    M.3.16.6: Directly compare two objects, with a measurable attribute in common, to see which object has "more of" or "less of" the attribute, and describe the difference.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Describe picture graph and bar graph.
    • Use vocabulary related to comparing data.
      Examples: more than, less than, most, least, equal.
    • Recognize attributes of data displays.
    • Locate information on data displays.
    • Classify objects into given categories.
    • Sort the categories by count.
    • Recognize different types of data displays.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.3.16 Measure lengths of objects using non standard tools (paper clips). Limit to whole numbers.
    M.AAS.3.17 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication or assistive technology, represent and interpret data on a picture or bar graph when given a model or a graph to complete.


    Mathematics
    MA2019 (2019)
    Grade: 3
    19. Estimate and measure liquid volumes and masses of objects using liters (l), grams (g), and kilograms (kg).

    a. Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving masses or volumes given in the same metric units.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Accurately measure the liquid volume and mass of objects by selecting and using appropriate tools (such as balance and spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, and measuring cups) to determine measures to the nearest whole unit.
    • Given an image of a measurement device, determine the volume or mass shown in the image.
    • Use the four operations to solve one-step word problems involving liquid volume or mass measurements.
    • Given two measurement quantities or two images of a measuring device, determine the total volume/mass, or find the difference between the two volumes/masses.
    • Given the volume or mass of an object, determine the volume/mass of more than one object using multiplication.
    • Given the total volume or mass of multiple identical objects, determine the volume/mass of a single object using division.
    • Explain and justify solutions using a variety of representations.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Liquid volume
    • Mass
    • Liter
    • Gram
    • Kilogram
    • Metric unit
    • Capacity
    • Matter
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Personal benchmarks for metric standard units of measure, mass (gram & kilogram) and liquid volume (liter), and the use of related tools (such as balance, spring scales, graduated cylinders, beakers, measuring cups) for measurement to those units.
    • Characteristics of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division contexts that involve measurements.
    • How to represent quantities and operations physically, pictorially, or symbolically.
    • Strategies to solve one-step word problems that involve measurement.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Measure liquid volume and mass in metric standard units.
    • Choose appropriate measurement tools and units of measure.
    • Represent quantities and operations physically, pictorially, or symbolically,
    • Use a variety of strategies to solve one-step word problems that involve measurement.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Capacity indicates the measure of the volume (dry or liquid) in a container.
    • Mass indicates the amount of matter in an object and can be represented with different sized units.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.3.19.1: Define liquid volume, mass, grams, kilograms, and liters.
    M.3.19.2: Recognize how the standard units of measure compare to one another.
    M.3.19.3: Identify key terms for word problems.
    M.3.19.4: Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end; understand that the length measurement of an object is the number of same-size length units that span it with no gaps or overlaps.
    M.3.19.5: Recall basic addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division facts.
    M.3.19.6: Describe measurable attributes of objects such as length or weight. Describe several measurable attributes of a single object.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Measure objects using standard units.
    • Recall single-digit subtraction facts.
    • Recall single-digit addition facts.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.3.19 Identify the appropriate measurement tool to measure liquids and masses of a given object.


    Local/National Standards:

     

    Primary Learning Objective(s):

    Students will accurately measure various items in the classroom and record and compare data gathered. Students will measure ingredients for a recipe.

    Additional Learning Objective(s):

    Students will participate in choral reading of a poem. Students will create their own books with original stories.

     Preparation Information 

    Total Duration:

    61 to 90 Minutes

    Materials and Resources:

    Standard/metric rulers, cut pieces of yarn, scissors, yard/meter sticks, data recording sheets for each student (see attachment), recipe and ingredients for "Dirt Pie" (see attachment), the book Inch By Inch, by Leo Lionni

    Technology Resources Needed:

     

    Background/Preparation:

    I used a stuffed inchworm mascot sitting on the table as I read the book, Inch by Inch, by Leo Lionni. I also had bookworm name plates and stickers for good workers. Research information on the inchworm or find an inchworm for students to observe.

      Procedures/Activities: 
    1.)Read the book Inch by Inch, by Leo Lionni. This book is the tale of a friendly inchworm who is in danger of being eaten by several birds. He cleverly inches his way to safety by measuring two tails, a neck, a beak, a pair of legs, a whole bird, and finally -a song. Mention that the book is beautifully illustrated in crayon and textured collage.

    2.)Discuss with students the two systems of measurement, standard and metric. Students will probably be familiar with an inch as a standard unit of measurement. Compare inches to centimeters, yards to meters. Go over with the students the directions of measuring activity, including the data recording handout.

    3.)Pass out data recording handouts (see attached), scissors, rulers/meter sticks and balls of string. Children may work with partners, if desired.

    4.)Circulate and help children as they measure their own neck, head, hand, arm and foot.

    5.)Students will record their data as they measure.

    6.)As they finish this activity, the teacher will provide a copy of "One Inch Tall" by Shel Silverstein for choral reading. (Click here for the words to the poem)

    7.)As a culminating activity, children will make accordian books (use a round shape cut from green tagboard or butcher paper and draw a face on the front page with a felt pen) and write about an inchworm or what it would be like to be only one inch tall.

    8.)Children will end the lesson by following a recipe (see attachment) to make "dirt pie" with gummy inchworms on top.


    Attachments:
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      Assessment  

    Assessment Strategies

    Teacher observation, oral questions, measurement data sheets, evaluation of stories written

    Acceleration:

    Bring an inchworm to class. Watch it measure things. (An inchworm is the caterpillar lava of a geometrid moth.) Find out more about inchworms. How do they move? Share research in class. Make a list of things that can and cannot be measured, including things in the classroom that can be measured. Talk about other things that cannot be measured - air, dreams, etc. Discuss how accurate measuring with your feet can be. Make small inchworm from a long piece of green construction paper. Mark it in inches and measure things on students' desks.

    Intervention:

     

    View the Special Education resources for instructional guidance in providing modifications and adaptations for students with significant cognitive disabilities who qualify for the Alabama Alternate Assessment.