ALEX Unit Plan

     

Natural Resources Shared Naturally

This Unit Plan provided by:
* Joanne Wells (Elmore County, Elmore County Board Of Education)
   Lori Keel (Elmore County, Elmore County Board Of Education)
   Erika Shockley (Elmore County, Eclectic Middle School)
   Rhonda (Gaye) Knight (Elmore County, Elmore County Board Of Education)
(* indicates Primary Author)
The event this resource created for: Not Applicable
Unit Plan Overview

Natural resources provides what living things need to survive and thrive. This unit explores the transfer of energy throughout the food chain, investigates the amounts of rainfall in a region, examines the patterns of Native Americans settling adjacent to water, and guides students as they design animals that would survive in a wet biome. The math, science, history, and language arts lessons included are strong enough to stand alone, but when taught simultaneously, strengthen each of the 5th grade standards.

This unit was created as part of the ALEX Interdisciplinary Resource Development Summit.

Courses of Study Standards
English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
16 ) Draw on information from multiple print or digital sources, demonstrating the ability to locate an answer to a question quickly or to solve a problem efficiently. [RI.5.7]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
18 ) Integrate information from several texts on the same topic in order to write or speak about the subject knowledgeably. [RI.5.9]

English Language Arts
ELA2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
19 ) By the end of the year, read and comprehend informational texts, including history/social studies, science, and technical texts, at the high end of the Grades 4-5 text complexity band independently and proficiently. [RI.5.10]

Social Studies
SS2010 (2010)
Grade: 5
United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
3 ) Distinguish differences among major American Indian cultures in North America according to geographic region, natural resources, community organization, economy, and belief systems.

•  Locating on a map American Indian nations according to geographic region
Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe major American Indian cultures in North America according to:
    • geographic region
    • natural resources
    • community organization
    • economy
    • belief systems
  • Locate American Indian nations on a map according to geographic region.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • belief system
  • community organization
  • distinguish
  • economy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The description of major American Indian cultures including geographic regions, the use of natural resources, community organization, economy and belief systems and locate these nations on a map.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate major American Indian nations on a map.
  • Distinguish American Indian cultural groups by examining the geographic region, natural resources, community organization, economy, and belief systems.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The major American Indian cultures can be distinguished from one another based on geographic region, natural resources, community organization, economy, and belief systems.
Alabama Archives Resources:
Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SS.AAS.5.3- Recognize that there were many American Indian cultures in North America.


Science
SC2015 (2015)
Grade: 5
11 ) Create a model to illustrate the transfer of matter among producers; consumers, including scavengers and decomposers; and the environment.


NAEP Framework
NAEP Statement::
L4.3: Organisms interact and are interdependent in various ways, including providing food and shelter to one another. Organisms can survive only in environments in which their needs are met. Some interactions are beneficial; others are detrimental to the organism and other organisms.


Unpacked Content
Scientific And Engineering Practices:
Developing and Using Models
Crosscutting Concepts: Systems and System Models
Disciplinary Core Idea: Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Construct and use models to illustrate the transfer of matter among producers; consumers, including scavengers and decomposers; and the environment.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Model
  • Transfer
  • Matter
  • Producer
  • Consumer
  • Decomposer
  • Environment
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The food of almost any kind of animal can be traced back to plants.
  • Organisms are related in food webs in which some animals eat plants for food and other animals eat the animals that eat plants.
  • Some organisms, such as fungi and bacteria, break down dead organisms (both plants or plants parts and animals) and therefore operate as "decomposers."
  • Decomposition eventually restores (recycles) some materials back to the soil.
  • Organisms can survive only in environments in which their particular needs are met.
  • A healthy ecosystem is one in which multiple species of different types are each able to meet their needs in a relatively stable web of life.
  • Newly introduced species can damage the balance of an ecosystem.
  • Matter cycles between the air and soil and among plants, animals, and microbes as these organisms live and die. Organisms obtain gases, and water, from the environment, and release waste matter (gas, liquid, or solid) back into the environment.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Develop a model to describe a phenomenon that includes the movement of matter within an ecosystem, identifying the relevant components such as matter, plants, animals, decomposers, and environment.
  • Describe the relationships among components that are relevant for describing the phenomenon, including the relationships in the system between organisms that consume other organisms, including the following:
    • Animals that consume other animals.
    • Animals that consume plants.
    • Organisms that consume dead plants and animals.
    • The movement of matter between organisms during consumption.
  • Use the model to describe the following:
    • The cycling of matter in the system between plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment.
    • How interactions in the system of plants, animals, decomposers, and the environment allow multiple species to meet their needs.
    • That newly introduced species can affect the balance of interactions in a system (e.g., a new animal that has no predators consumes much of another organism's food within the ecosystem).
    • That changing an aspect (e.g., organisms or environment) of the ecosystem will affect other aspects of the ecosystem.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • A system can be described in terms of its components, like producers, consumers, and the environment, and their interactions, like the cycling of matter.
AMSTI Resources:
AMSTI Module:
Dynamics of Ecosystems

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
SCI.AAS.5.11- Using a given model, identify a missing part of a simple food chain.


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 5
4. Read, write, and compare decimals to thousandths.

a. Read and write decimals to thousandths using base-ten numerals, number names, and expanded form.

Example: 347.392 = 3 × 100 + 4 × 10 + 7 × 1 + 3 × (1/10) + 9 × (1/100) + 2 × (1/1000).

b. Compare two decimals to thousandths based on the meaning of the digits in each place, using >, =, and < to record the results of comparisons.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Given a decimal number in one form (words, base-ten numerals, expanded), identify the number in another form.
  • Read decimals with number names.

  • Example: Read 4.023 as "four and 23 thousandths."
  • Write decimals using base-ten numerals and expanded form.

  • Example: 4.023 as 4 x 1 + 2 x 1/100 + 3 x 1/1000 or 4 x 1 + 2 x 0.01 + 3 x 0.001.
  • Use place value understanding to compare two decimals.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Compare
  • Decimal
  • Thousandths
  • Hundredths
  • Tenths
  • Symbol
  • Greater than
  • Less than
  • Equal
  • Place value strategy
  • Expanded form
  • Expanded notation
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to read and write whole numbers in standard form, word form, and expanded form.
  • How to compare two whole numbers using place value understanding.
  • Prior place value understanding with whole numbers is extended and applied to decimal values.
  • Recognize and model decimal place value using visual representations to compare.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Read and write decimal values in word form, standard form, and expanded form.
  • Compare decimals to thousandths using <, >, or = .
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the adjacent place value relationship in the base ten system extends to decimals and is used to write decimals in expanded form and compare decimals.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.5.4.1: Recognize decimals as parts of a whole.
M.5.4.2: Compare whole numbers.
M.5.4.3: Write whole numbers in words and expanded form.
M.5.4.4: Read whole numbers.
M.5.4.5: Define expanded notation and standard form.
M.5.4.6: Convert a number written in expanded to standard form.
M.5.4.7: Define hundredths and thousandths.
M.5.4.8: Compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.
M.5.4.9: Identify comparison symbols.
Examples: >, =, and <.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Read and write decimal values in word form, standard form, and expanded form.
  • Compare decimals to thousandths using <, >, or = .
  • Understand rounding decimals using place value.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.5.3 Compare base-10 models up to 99 and whole numbers up to 100 to determine symbols (<, >, =).


Mathematics
MA2019 (2019)
Grade: 5
5. Use place value understanding to round decimals to thousandths.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
When given a decimal number,
  • Use place value vocabulary and models to justify the rounding of the number to a specified place value.
  • Rounded to a specified place value, identify a number that could have resulted in that rounding.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Round
  • Place value
  • Tenths
  • Hundredths
  • Thousandths
  • Decimal
  • Number line
  • Midpoint
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Round decimals using place value understanding.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • in the base ten system, the adjacent place value relationship extends to decimals and is used to round decimals.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.5.5.1: Round multi-digit whole numbers to any place.
M.5.5.2: Round whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Use the standard algorithm to find a product.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.5.3 Compare base-10 models up to 99 and whole numbers up to 100 to determine symbols (<, >, =).


Driving Skills
21st Century Skills/Success Skills
Collaboration/Team Work, Creativity, Communication, Critical Thinking/Problem Solving, Time Management
Essential Question/Challenging Problem

In what ways do living things depend on natural resources for survival?

Unit Culminating Product(s)
Culminating Products - Individual

Science: Students will make chains to show the transference of energy.

Math: Students will compare annual rainfall amounts across the country.

Language Arts: Student will create a digital rendering of an animal that would live in a particular biome.

Culminating Products - Group

History: Students will create a digital presentation showing the relationships between the resources available in a region and the culture of the Native Americans residing there.

 

Unit Assessments
Assessments Formative
Practice Presentations, Notes
Assessments Summative
Oral Presentation, with rubric, Other Product(s) or Performance(s), with rubric:, Other
Assessments Summative (Other)
Digital Project - Office 365 Suite (PowerPoint, SWAY, etc.)
Unit Reflections
Reflections Student
Whole-Class Discussion
Reflections Student (Other)
Reflections Student Notes

The teacher should check that students gained knowledge of the content and reflect upon how students were affected by experiencing the same theme in all classes.

Reflections Teacher 1
What were students able to do?
Reflections Teacher 2
What evidence do you have?
Reflections Teacher 3
Which students need additional instruction?
Reflections Teacher 4
How will the next lesson be adjusted to meet their needs?
Career Readiness Indicators
No Credentials Selected
Attached Resources
Lesson Plan
1 : EcoCreature...Animal Discovery
2 : Modeling Energy Within the Food Chain
3 : Native Americans: How Their Environment Affected Their Culture
4 : Rain Drops
Learning Activity
Linked Attachments
compare-decimals-precip.docx
Exit-Card-precip.docx
Native-American-Project---Info.docx
rounding-precip.docx
Planning Calendar
UnitPlanCalendar.docx