The New South: A Social & Economic View

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This podcast is part of the series: ArchiTreats: Food for Thought

Multimedia Details Title: The New South: A Social & Economic View
Creator: Marlene Rikard
Submitted By: Alabama Department of Archives and Histo, Informal Education Partner, Informal Education Partner
School/Organization:

Alabama Department of Archives and History


Overview:

ArchiTreats: Food for Thought celebrates the Year of Alabama History through a series of sequential lectures in Alabama history by leading experts in the field. Join us as Marlene Rikard presents The New South: A Social and Economic View. This presentation was held at the Alabama Department of Archives and History.

Post-Reconstruction Alabama experienced major social and economic changes in the era known as the “New South,” a term coined by Henry Grady of the Atlanta Constitution. Emancipation of the slaves and falling cotton prices brought changes in agriculture for plantation owners, African Americans, and poor whites. Although farming remained the occupation of most Alabamians, industrialization became the mantra of new leaders who promised recovery and prosperity though the development of the state’s natural resources in mining and manufacturing. But prosperity proved elusive and change brought conflict in the form of strikes, segregation and Jim Crow laws, political turmoil, and battles over temperance, woman’s suffrage, regulation of public utilities, and convict leasing. The era changed Alabama forever.

Dr. Marlene Hunt Rikard recently retired as Professor of History at Samford University. Following graduation from Auburn University, she began her work life as a graphic designer before returning to school for graduate work in history and teaching for thirty-five years. She was also Director of Samford’s London Programs for over a decade. She has served as president of the Southern Association of Women Historians, the Alabama Association of Historians, and the Alabama Historical Association.

This ArchiTreats presentation is made possible by the Friends of the Alabama Archives and a grant from the Alabama Humanities Foundation, a state program of the National Endowment for the Humanities. The public is invited to bring a sack lunch and enjoy a bit of Alabama history. Coffee and tea will be provided by the Friends of the Alabama Archives. For more information, call (334) 353-4712.


Length: 50:29
Content Areas: Social Studies
Alabama Course of Study Alignments and/or Professional Development Standard Alignments:
SS2010 (4) Alabama Studies
9. Analyze political and economic issues facing Alabama during Reconstruction for their impact on various social groups.
Examples: political—military rule, presence of Freedmen's Bureau, Alabama's readmittance to the Union
economic—sharecropping, tenant farming, scarcity of goods and money
  • Interpreting the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States
  • Identifying African Americans who had an impact on Alabama during Reconstruction in Alabama
  • Identifying major political parties in Alabama during Reconstruction
  • SS2010 (4) Alabama Studies
    10. Analyze social and educational changes during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries for their impact on Alabama.
    Examples: social—implementation of the Plessey versus Ferguson "separate but not equal" court decision, birth of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP)
    educational—establishment of normal schools and land-grant colleges such as Huntsville Normal School (Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical [A&M] University), Agricultural and Mechanical College of Alabama (Auburn University), Tuskegee Normal and Industrial Institute (Tuskegee University), Lincoln Normal School (Alabama State University)
  • Explaining the development and changing role of industry, trade, and agriculture in Alabama during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, including the rise of Populism
  • Explaining the Jim Crow laws
  • Identifying Alabamians who made contributions in the fields of science, education, the arts, politics, and business during the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries
  • SS2010 (5) United States Studies: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
    12. Summarize successes and failures of the Reconstruction Era.
  • Evaluating the extension of citizenship rights to African Americans included in the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution of the United States
  • Analyzing the impact of Reconstruction for its effect on education and social institutions in the United States
  • Examples: Horace Mann and education reform, Freedmen's Bureau, establishment of segregated schools, African-American churches
  • Explaining the black codes and the Jim Crow laws
  • Describing post-Civil War land distribution, including tenant farming and sharecropping
  • SS2010 (11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
    1. Explain the transition of the United States from an agrarian society to an industrial nation prior to World War I. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
  • Interpreting the impact of change from workshop to factory on workers' lives, including the New Industrial Age from 1870 to 1900, the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), the Pullman Strike, the Haymarket Square Riot, and the impact of John D. Rockefeller, Andrew Carnegie, Samuel Gompers, Eugene V. Debs, A. Philip Randolph, and Thomas Alva Edison
  • SS2010 (11) United States History II: The Industrial Revolution to the Present
    2. Evaluate social and political origins, accomplishments, and limitations of Progressivism. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.f., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
  • Explaining the impact of the Populist Movement on the role of the federal government in American society
  • Assessing the impact of muckrakers on public opinion during the Progressive movement, including Upton Sinclair, Jacob A. Riis, and Ida M. Tarbell
  • Examples: women's suffrage, Ida B. Wells-Barnett, temperance movement
  • Explaining national legislation affecting the Progressive movement, including the Sherman Antitrust Act and the Clayton Antitrust Act
  • Determining the influence of the Niagara Movement, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), Booker T. Washington, W. E. B. Du Bois, Marcus Garvey, and Carter G. Woodson on the Progressive Era
  • Assessing the significance of the public education movement initiated by Horace Mann
  • Comparing the presidential leadership of Theodore Roosevelt, William Howard Taft, and Woodrow Wilson in obtaining passage of measures regarding trust-busting, the Hepburn Act, the Pure Food and Drug Act, the Federal Trade Commission, the Federal Reserve Act, and conservation
  • SS2010 (10) United States History I: Beginnings to the Industrial Revolution
    16. Explain the transition of the United States from an agrarian society to an industrial nation prior to World War I. [A.1.a., A.1.b., A.1.c., A.1.d., A.1.e., A.1.h., A.1.i., A.1.k.]
  • Describing the impact of Manifest Destiny on the economic and technological development of the post-Civil War West, including mining, the cattle industry, and the transcontinental railroad
  • Identifying the changing role of the American farmer, including the establishment of the Granger movement and the Populist Party and agrarian rebellion over currency issues
  • Evaluating the Dawes Act for its effect on tribal identity, land ownership, and assimilation of American Indians between Reconstruction and World War I
  • Comparing population percentages, motives, and settlement patterns of immigrants from Asia, Africa, Europe, and Latin America, including the Chinese Exclusion Act regarding immigration quotas