Courses of Study: Social Studies

Number of Standards matching query: 13
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 7
Civics
All Resources: 12
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 12
Unit Plans: 0
1 ) Compare influences of ancient Greece, the Roman Republic, the Judeo-Christian tradition, the Magna Carta, federalism, the Mayflower Compact, the English Bill of Rights, the House of Burgesses, and the Petition of Rights on the government of the United States.

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Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Summarize the contributions of various historical influences and classify how each of these influences impacted the establishment of the American Government.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • direct democracy
  • representative democracy
  • Feudal system
  • royalty
  • nobility
  • common people
  • Parliament
  • rights
  • due process
  • rule of law
  • quartering
  • punishment
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many important principles of American government originated with the Greeks, Romans and early English governments.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Distinguish relevant material about the historical influence.
  • Cite evidence to show similarities between influences. Analyze primary source documents.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The Founding Fathers were impacted by several historical influences that helped them create our system of government.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 7
Civics
All Resources: 15
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 15
Unit Plans: 0
2 ) Explain essential characteristics of the political system of the United States, including the organization and function of political parties and the process of selecting political leaders.

•  Describing the influence of John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Thomas Paine, Niccolò Machiavelli, Charles de Montesquieu, and François-Marie Arouet (Voltaire) on the political system of the United States
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Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the influence of important philosophers on the U.S. political system.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • philosophers
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The important ideas and contributions of historical thinkers such as John Locke, Thomas Hobbes, Jean-Jaques Rousseau, Thomas Paine, Niccolo Machiavelli, Charles de Montesquieu, Voltaire.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Relate the ideas put forth by important philosophers to founding ideas and documents of American government. Interpret primary source documents to identify original ideas.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Many of the founding documents of the United States are based upon the ideas of various Enlightenment Philosophers.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 7
Civics
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 7
Unit Plans: 0
3 ) Compare the government of the United States with other governmental systems, including monarchy, limited monarchy, oligarchy, dictatorship, theocracy, and pure democracy.

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Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compare and Contrast other forms of government with the U.S. government focusing on who has the power and how power is acquired/achieved.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • power
  • federalism
  • republic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The characteristics of the various forms of government found around the world including Federal Republic (representative democracy), Monarchy (absolute monarchy), Limited monarchy (constitutional monarchy), Oligarchy, Dictatorship, Theocracy, and Pure democracy (direct democracy).
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Interpret primary source documents.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The system of government of the United States can be compared to other forms of government in the world.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 7
Civics
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 5
Unit Plans: 0
4 ) Describe structures of state and local governments in the United States, including major Alabama offices and officeholders. (Alabama)

•  Describing how local and state governments are funded (Alabama)
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Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the organization of state and local governments focusing on Alabama's state government, officials, and sources of funding.
  • Teacher Vocabulary:
    • funding
    • revenue
    • taxes
    • county
    • city
    • branches of government: legislative, executive, judicial
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The basic organizational structure of Alabama's government including the legislative, judicial and executive branches.
    • The basic funding sources of state and local governments.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Identify the major office holders of the three branches of Alabama's government.
    • Identify types of local government.
    • Classify the different types of state and local government funding.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Alabama's state and local office holders are elected and that funding comes from a variety of sources.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 7
Civics
All Resources: 18
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 17
Unit Plans: 0
5 ) Compare duties and functions of members of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government. (Alabama)

•  Locating political and geographic districts of the legislative, executive, and judicial branches of Alabama's local and state governments and of the national government (Alabama)
•  Describing the organization and jurisdiction of courts at the local, state, and national levels within the judicial system of the United States (Alabama)
•  Explaining concepts of separation of powers and checks and balances among the three branches of state and national governments (Alabama)
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Strand: Geography, History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Civics
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Relate the organization, duties and functions of state and local government examining how they compare and contrast to the organization, duties and functions of the federal government.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • branches: executive, legislative, judicial
  • duties
  • functions
  • organization
  • jurisdiction
  • federal
  • districts
  • separation of powers
  • checks and balances
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The functions of each of the three branches of the Federal Government and the three branches of Alabama's government.
  • The functions of the local government.
  • The organizational structure of local, state and Federal Courts.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Locate state and federal political districts and geographic districts in Alabama on a map.
  • Cite evidence in primary source documents to support important concepts of American Government.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The structure of government at the federal and state level and the unique duties and functions of each are set forth by the U.S. and Alabama Constitutions.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Unit Plans: 0
    6 ) Explain the importance of juvenile, adult, civil, and criminal laws within the judicial system of the United States.

    •  Explaining rights of citizens as guaranteed by the Bill of Rights under the Constitution of the United States
    •  Explaining what is meant by the term rule of law
    •  Justifying consequences of committing a civil or criminal offense
    •  Contrasting juvenile and adult laws at local, state, and federal levels (Alabama)
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    Strand: History, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Differentiate between juvenile and adult laws, as well as between civil and criminal laws. Identify the protections given in the U.S. Bill of Rights.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • juvenile
    • civil law
    • criminal law
    • rights
    • Bill of Rights
    • rule of law
    • state
    • federal
    • local
    • court
    • offense
    • felony
    • misdemeanor
    • jail
    • prison
    • juvenile detention center
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The similarities and differences between civil and criminal law.
    • The structure of the juvenile court system.
    • The rights and freedoms guaranteed in the Bill of Rights.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Use primary source documents to justify the actions of courts.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Laws are different for adults and juveniles and that there are separate civil and criminal laws and courts.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Unit Plans: 0
    7 ) Determine how people organize economic systems to address basic economic questions regarding which goods and services will be produced, how they will be distributed, and who will consume them.

    •  Using economic concepts to explain historical and current developments and issues in global, national, state, or local contexts (Alabama)
    Example: increase in oil prices resulting from supply and demand

    •  Analyzing agriculture, tourism, and urban growth in Alabama for their impact on economic development (Alabama)
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    Strand: Economics, Geography, History
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Describe how the different economic systems influence the answers to the questions: What goods and services are produced? How they are distributed? and Who consumes them?
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • economic system
    • consumer
    • land
    • labor
    • capital
    • good
    • service
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The economic system under which you operate will help determine which goods and services are produced, how they will be distributed and who will consume them.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Analyze and interpret charts, graphs, and tables to support assumptions.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Within the various economic systems, several factors contribute to determining what is produced, where it is produced, and how items are distributed.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Unit Plans: 0
    8 ) Appraise the relationship between the consumer and the marketplace in the economy of the United States regarding scarcity, opportunity cost, trade-off decision making, and the stock market.

    •  Describing effects of government policies on the free market
    •  Identifying laws protecting rights of consumers and avenues of recourse when those rights are violated
    •  Comparing economic systems, including market, command, and traditional
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    Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Draw conclusions about the relationship between the consumer and the marketplace in U.S. economy.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • supply and demand
    • free enterprise
    • market economy
    • command economy
    • traditional economy
    • mixed economy
    • good
    • service
    • scarcity
    • opportunity cost
    • trade-off decision making
    • stock market
    • policy
    • regulations
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The following economies answers the three basic questions:
      • Traditional Economy
        • Goods are produced for the community based on traditional needs.
        • Individuals produce goods based on custom.
        • They produce for themselves and the community.
      • Market Economy
        • Goods are produced based on consumer demand.
        • Individuals and businesses are free to choose how items are produced.
        • Goods are produced for the customer in hopes of gaining a profit.
      • Command Economy
        • The government decides what goods will be produced.
        • The government decides how goods will be produced.
        • Goods are produced for the purposes of the government.
    • The U.S. economy is based on principles of free market. Due to the effect of government policies and regulations, the U.S. economy resembles a Mixed Economy. U.S. laws that protect employees include minimum wage, safe work conditions, and child labor laws. Some U.S. laws that protect the consumers are food labeling requirements and safety features on cars. Consumers who have problems with products can register complaints with the government or seek recourse under the judicial system.
    • The U.S. stock market is a gauge of U.S. economic health. When the stock market is strong, it influences businesses to invest and expand (increase in profit leads to employment, rise in consumer confidence ) When the stock market is weak, businesses are less likely to take risks which can affect the overall economic health of our country (loss of revenue, rise in unemployment rate, fewer new businesses created). Consumer behavior influences the fluctuation in the stock market.
    • The consumer is influenced by the following:
      • Scarcity- is a shortage or limited amount of resources like time, money, land, labor, capital et al.
      • Trade-off decisions- the alternative you face if you decide to do one thing rather than another. (Example: A farmer can grow corn or cotton. A student can attend University of South Alabama or University of North Alabama)
      • Opportunity cost — the cost of the next best use of resources when choosing to do one thing or another. (Example: Because the farmer grows corn, he cannot grow cotton. Because the student choose to go University of South Alabama, he does not cannot go to University of North Alabama).
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Define Traditional Economy, Market Economy, Command Economy, and Mixed Economy.
    • Understand how each Economy answers the three basic economic questions.
    • Identify the U.S. economic system.
    • Explain how the stock market impacts the Marketplace.
    • Relate the ideas of scarcity, opportunity cost and trade-off decisions to the consumer's role in the Marketplace.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Scarcity, opportunity costs, and trade-off decisions influence the consumer's behavior causing changes in the marketplace and the U.S. stock market.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 9
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 9
    Unit Plans: 0
    9 ) Apply principles of money management to the preparation of a personal budget that addresses housing, transportation, food, clothing, medical expenses, insurance, checking and savings accounts, loans, investments, credit, and comparison shopping.

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    Strand: Economics, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Demonstrate the ability to manage money effectively through a personal budget.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • calculate
    • estimate
    • principles of money management
    • budget
    • savings
    • checking account
    • income
    • expenses
    • insurance
    • taxes
    • comparison
    • shopping
    • credit
    • debt
    • investments
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Effective money management means that a citizen has to take into account that the money they make should be enough to cover expenses like housing, transportation, food, clothing, medical expenses, and insurance and this can be accomplished by making and following a budget.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Estimate and calculate income and expenses in order to create a budget.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Effective money management includes making a budget based on income and expenses.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 16
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 16
    Unit Plans: 0
    10 ) Describe individual and civic responsibilities of citizens of the United States.

    Examples: individual—respect for rights of others, self-discipline, negotiation, compromise, fiscal responsibility

    civic—respect for law, patriotism, participation in political process, fiscal responsibility

    •  Differentiating rights, privileges, duties, and responsibilities between citizens and noncitizens
    •  Explaining how United States' citizenship is acquired by immigrants
    •  Explaining character traits that are beneficial to individuals and society
    Examples: honesty, courage, compassion, civility, loyalty

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    Strand: History, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Describe the rights, duties, and responsibilities of U.S. citizens, as well as paths to citizenship.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • responsibilities
    • duties
    • rights
    • privileges
    • citizen
    • alien
    • immigrants
    • naturalization
    • character
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The distinction between right, duties and responsibilities. There is a way for immigrants to become a citizen.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Cite primary source documents to provide evidence that an idea is a right guaranteed to citizens.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • There are rights, duties, responsibilities, and privileges of U.S. citizenship.
    Alabama Archives Resources:
    Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 8
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 8
    Unit Plans: 0
    11 ) Compare changes in social and economic conditions in the United States during the twentieth and twenty-first centuries.

    Examples: social—family values, peer pressure, education opportunities, women in the workplace

    economic—career opportunities, disposable income, consumption of goods and services

    •  Determining benefits of Alabama's role in world trade (Alabama)
    •  Tracing the political and social impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement from 1954 to the present, including Alabama's role (Alabama)
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    Strand: Economics, History, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Describe changes over the past hundred years in Alabama's political, social, and economic conditions.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • social conditions
    • economic conditions
    • world trade
    • Civil Rights Movement
    • voting rights
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Many political, social, and economic changes have occurred in the United States over the past 100 years.
    • Alabama played a major role in the Civil Rights Movement.
    • Alabama's role in contemporary world trade includes being a major exporter of poultry, steel, and machinery, in addition to attracting many international companies to the state.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Investigate social changes and their impact in the U.S. and Alabama during the 20th and 21st centuries.
    • Investigate economic changes and their impact in the U.S. and Alabama during the 20th and 21st centuries.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • There have been many social and economic changes in the past 100 years and Alabama has been at the forefront of many of these changes.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 14
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 14
    Unit Plans: 0
    12 ) Describe how the United States can be improved by individual and group participation in civic and community activities.

    •  Identifying options for civic and community action
    Examples: investigating the feasibility of a specific solution to a traffic problem, developing a plan for construction of a subdivision, using maps to make and justify decisions about best locations for public facilities

    •  Determining ways to participate in the political process
    Examples: voting, running for office, serving on a jury, writing letters, being involved in political parties and political campaigns

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    Strand: Economics, Geography, History, Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Explain how participating in civic and community activities improves life in our community, state, and country.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • civic
    • community
    • political process
    • political participation
    • political parties
    • campaigns
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Individual citizens and community groups can improve their community by actively participating in the political process. Examples of participating in the political process include voting; running for office; writing letters to office holders; being involved in political parties and political campaigns.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • List ways to actively participate in the political process and in their community.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Individual and community participation has the potential to improve the U.S. society.
    Alabama Archives Resources:
    Click below to access all Alabama Archives resources aligned to this standard.
    Social Studies (2010)
    Grade(s): 7
    Civics
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 0
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Unit Plans: 0
    13 ) Identify contemporary American issues since 2001, including the establishment of the United States Department of Homeland Security, the enactment of the Patriot Act of 2001, and the impact of media analysis.

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    Strand: Civics and Government
    Course Title: Civics
    Evidence of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Draw conclusions to support or refute the development of Homeland Security, the Patriot Act and contemporary media bias since 2001.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Homeland Security
    • Patriot Act
    • media bias
    • privacy
    • terrorism
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • The events that led to the creation of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and the passage of Patriot Act.
    • The main duties of the Department of Homeland Security.
    • The major provisions of the Patriot Act that allow those suspected of terrorism to have their property, public and private records, or phone searched or seized without warrant.
    • There is bias in American media.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Detect bias statements by examining multiple sources of information.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • Events of 2001 led to major changes in American government designed to further protect the country.