Courses of Study : Social Studies

Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 4
Classroom Resources: 4
1 ) Describe the development of sociology as a social science field of study.

•  Identifying important figures in the field of sociology, including Karl Marx, Émile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead, and W. E. B. Du Bois
•  Identifying characteristics of sociology, including functional integration, power, social action, social structure, and culture
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Discuss influential researchers and figures in sociology.
  • Describe major ideas studied by sociologists.
  • Differentiate sociology from other social sciences.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • sociology
  • functional integration
  • power
  • social action
  • social structure
  • culture
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Basic concepts in sociology. Influential sociologists throughout history, including Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, George Herbert Mead, and WEB DuBois.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare and contrast sociological concepts.
  • Trace the historical development of sociology as a social science.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
    There are different concepts in sociology, such as functional integration, power, social action, social structure, and culture.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
2 ) Explain methods and tools of research used by sociologists to study human society, including surveys, polls, statistics, demographic information, case studies, participant observations, and program evaluations.

•  Differentiating between qualitative and quantitative research methods
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the different research methods used by sociologists.
  • Differentiate between qualitative and quantitative research methodologies.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • surveys
  • polls
  • statistics
  • demographic information
  • case studies
  • participant observations
  • program evaluations
  • qualitative research
  • quantitative research
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The methods for collecting qualitative and quantitative data.
  • How sociologists use the scientific method differently and similarly to other social scientists.
  • How to calculate and interpret simple statistics related to sociological research methodologies.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Conduct quantitative and qualitative research demonstrations.
  • Describe different research methodologies used by sociologists.
  • Compute simple statistical calculations using data collected in ways that mirror methods used by sociologists.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • It is important to use scientific methodology to study sociological phenomena.
  • There are specific steps for collecting and interpreting data using qualitative and quantitative research methods.
  • There are differences between qualitative and quantitative research methods.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
3 ) Describe how values and norms influence individual behavior.

•  Comparing ways in which cultures differ, change, and resist change, including countercultures, subcultures, and ethnocentric beliefs
•  Comparing the use of various symbols within and across societies
Examples: objects, gestures, sounds, images

•  Explaining the significance of socialization in human development
•  Illustrating key concepts of socialization, including self-concept, looking-glass self, significant others, and role-taking
•  Determining the role of family, school, peer groups, and the media in socializing young people
•  Explaining the process of socialization in adulthood
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Evaluate how values and norms influence behavior.
  • Analyze how change affects culture.
  • Analyze symbols prevalent in various cultures.
  • Explain the concepts and significance of socialization practices in various cultures.
  • Analyze how family, peer group, social institutions, and the media factor into socialization practices.
  • Differentiate how children and adults are socialized.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • values
  • norms
  • culture
  • social change
  • counterculture
  • subcultures
  • ethnocentrism
  • gestures
  • social symbols
  • socialization
  • family
  • peer groups
  • social institutions
  • media
  • self-concept
  • looking-glass self
  • significant others
  • role-taking
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The meaning of values and norms.
  • The processes of socialization.
  • The dynamics of culture and social change.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze the dynamics of culture change.
  • Explain the processes of socialization considering the multiple factors involved.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Socialization works in various cultures and contexts.
  • Social change works in various cultures and contexts.
  • Norms and values work to influence individual and group behavior.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
4 ) Identify antisocial behaviors, including social deviance, addiction, terrorism, anomie, and related arguments for the strain theory and the conflict theory.

•  Contrasting violent crime, property crime, and victimless crime with white-collar crime
•  Comparing methods for dealing with antisocial behavior, including imprisonment, restitution, community service, rehabilitation, education, and therapy
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Differentiate antisocial behaviors from asocial behavior.
  • Discuss the factors that lead to social deviance.
  • Describe the characteristics of addictive behaviors.
  • Analyze factors that lead to terrorism.
  • Understand anomie.
  • Differentiate between strain theory and conflict theory.
  • Analyze factors that lead to crime.
  • Differentiate among types of crime.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of methods used to deal with crime and criminal behavior by societies.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • antisocial behavior
  • social deviance
  • addiction
  • terrorism
  • anomie
  • strain theory
  • conflict theory
  • crime
  • violent crime
  • victimless crime
  • white-collar crime
  • property crime
  • imprisonment
  • restitution
  • community service
  • rehabilitation
  • education
  • therapy
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The differences between antisocial and asocial behavior.
  • Examples of social deviance, terrorism, addiction, and anomie.
  • Examples of crime and criminal behavior.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify antisocial behavior.
  • Identify factors that lead to social deviance, terrorism, addiction, and anomie.
  • Differentiate between strain theory and conflict theory.
  • Analyze factors that lead to crime and criminal behavior.
  • Evaluate effective methods for dealing with crime and criminal behavior.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are factors that lead to antisocial behavior.
  • There are factors that lead to crime.
  • There are ways in which society deals with crime and criminal behavior.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
5 ) Describe how environment and genetics affect personality, including self-concept and temperament.

Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Explain the interaction effects of genetics and environment on behavior.
  • Describe how genetics and environment interact to influence a specific behavior such as self-concept or temperament.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • gene
  • chromosome
  • DNA
  • heritability
  • environment
  • twin studies
  • adoption studies
  • temperament
  • self-concept
  • evolution
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Basic principles and concepts of genetic inheritance.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Describe interaction effects of genetics and environment on behavior.
  • Explain the processes of genetic inheritance.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Genetics and environment interact to influence behavior.
  • There are basic principles of genetic inheritance.
  • There are research methods that explore variables of the relative influence of genetics and inheritance.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
6 ) Identify stages of development across the life cycle, including birth, childhood, adolescence, adulthood, parenthood, middle age, and late adulthood.

•  Describing the value of birth cohorts as a research device
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe different stages of development across the lifespan.
  • Evaluate the relative influence of culture on development across the lifespan.
  • Discuss issues affecting each stage of development across the lifespan.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • development
  • infancy
  • childhood
  • adolescence
  • adulthood
  • middle adulthood
  • late adulthood
  • parenthood
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Stages of the lifespan.
  • Basics of research methodology.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Define each stage of development.
  • Identify various theorists' perspectives on stages of development throughout the lifespan.
  • Apply different research strategies for assessing developmental progress.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is a progression of development from birth to death.
  • Culture and genetics influence development.
  • There are specific ways in which sociologists study development.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
7 ) Describe types and characteristics of groups.

•  Explaining the relationship between social stratification and social class, including status ascription versus achievement, intergenerational social mobility, and structural occupational change
•  Relating the importance of group dynamics, including size, leadership, decision making, and gender roles
•  Distinguishing between the terms, race and ethnicity and prejudice and discrimination
•  Describing social inequalities experienced as related to gender and age
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe types and characteristics of groups.
  • Explain the relationship between social stratification and social class.
  • Analyze the importance of group dynamics.
  • Differentiate among the terms race, ethnicity, discrimination, and prejudice.
  • Evaluate the effect of social inequalities based on gender and age.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • groups
  • social stratification
  • social class
  • status ascription
  • achievement
  • intergenerational social mobility
  • structural occupational change
  • group dynamics
  • gender roles
  • race
  • ethnicity
  • discrimination
  • prejudice
  • social inequalities
  • gender
  • age
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The characteristics of groups.
  • Behaviors that lead to prejudice and discrimination.
  • The existence of social inequalities.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Differentiate among dynamics that influence group behavior.
  • Differentiate among factors that lead to social inequalities.
  • Identify factors that lead to discrimination and prejudice.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are factors that influence group behavior.
  • There is a relationship between social stratification and social class.
  • There are specific types and characteristics of groups.
  • There are differences among terms related to race, ethnicity, prejudice and discrimination.
  • There are effects of social inequalities related to gender and age.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
8 ) Describe the structure and function of the family unit, including traditional, extended, nuclear, single-parent, and blended families involving the roles of parent, child, and spouse.

•  Identifying problems facing families, including abuse, divorce, teen pregnancy, poverty, addiction, family violence, and care of elderly family members
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Differentiate among types of families.
  • Describe different types of families. Identify problems facing families.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • family
  • traditional family
  • extended family
  • nuclear family
  • single-parent family
  • blended family
  • parent
  • child
  • spouse
  • abuse
  • divorce
  • teen pregnancy
  • poverty
  • addiction
  • family violence
  • elder care
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Many different types of families exist.
  • There are many different types of problems facing families.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Discussing the factors that affect families.
  • Differentiate among types of families.
  • Debate causes and effects of common problems affecting families.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are factors that affect families.
  • There are different types of families.
  • There are many causes and effects of common problems that affect families.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 3
Classroom Resources: 3
9 ) Explain the purpose of social systems and institutions, including schools, churches, voluntary associations, and governments.

•  Describing origins and beliefs of various religions
•  Distinguishing among the concepts of power, coercion, and authority
•  Comparing charismatic, traditional, and rational-legal authority
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Analyze the purpose of social systems and institutions.
  • Differentiate among the origins and beliefs of various religions.
  • Distinguish among the concepts of power, coercion, and authority.
  • Compare different types of authority.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • social systems
  • social institutions
  • schools
  • churches
  • voluntary associations
  • governments
  • power
  • coercion
  • authority
  • charismatic authority
  • traditional authority
  • rational-legal authority
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The different types of social systems and institutions.
  • The many different religious traditions.
  • The definitions of power, coercion and authority.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Discussing the purpose of social institutions.
  • Demonstrating understanding of various religious traditions.
  • Distinguishing among types of power and authority.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are important but different social institutions.
  • There are many impacts of different social institutions.
  • There are many different origins and beliefs of different religious traditions.
  • There can be specific impacts of power, coercion, and authority.
  • There are many different types of authority.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Classroom Resources: 4
10 ) Describe social movement and social change.

•  Comparing various forms of collective behavior, including mobs, riots, fads, and crowds
•  Identifying major ethical and social issues facing modern society
Examples: technological, governmental, medical

•  Explaining the impact of the modern Civil Rights Movement, the women's movement, the gun rights movement, the green movement, and other minority movements in the United States
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the impact of different social movements throughout history.
  • Compare various forms of collective behavior.
  • Analyze the causes and effects of ethical and social issues facing modern society.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • social movement
  • social change
  • collective behavior
  • mobs
  • riots
  • fads
  • crowds
  • Civil Rights movement
  • women's movement
  • gun rights movement
  • green movement
  • other minority movements
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The many historical movements related to social issues.
  • Several examples of collective behavior.
  • The ethical issues facing modern society.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Discuss the factors leading to various social movements.
  • Understand how collective behavior works.
  • Analyze ethical and social issues facing modern society.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There have been many factors influencing the development of various social movements throughout history.
  • There are many examples of how collective behavior has worked.
  • There are a variety of dilemmas involved in the different social and ethical issues facing modern society.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Sociology
All Resources: 0
11 ) Contrast population patterns using the birth rate, death rate, migration rate, and dependency rate.

•  Identifying the impact of urbanization on human social patterns
•  Analyzing factors that affect the depletion of natural resources for their impact on social and economic development
•  Projecting future population patterns
Unpacked Content
Strand: Elective
Course Title: Sociology
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Contrast population patterns using different factors.
  • Analyze the impact of urbanization on human social patterns.
  • Evaluate the factors that affect the depletion of natural resources.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • population patterns
  • birth rate
  • death rate
  • migration rate
  • dependency rate
  • urbanization
  • depletion
  • natural resources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How human social patterns affect population change.
  • The factors that lead to resource depletion.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Analyze population patterns.
  • Understand how human social patterns affect population change.
  • Analyze factors that lead to resource depletion.
  • Project future population patterns.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are different rates that affect population change.
  • You use current knowledge of factors that affect population change to determine future population patterns.
  • There are factors that lead to resource depletion.