Courses of Study : English Language Arts (Grade 1)

Recurring Standards
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 13
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 9
R1. Utilize active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings, following agreed-upon rules for participation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R1.
  • Active Listening
  • Discussion
  • Conversation
  • Rules
  • Participation
Knowledge:
R1. Students know:
  • Active listening skills.
  • Agreed-upon rules for participation.
Skills:
R1. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings.
  • Converse in pairs, small groups, and large groups.
  • Practice the agreed-upon rules for participation.
Understanding:
R1. Students understand that:
  • Conversations and discussions follow agreed-upon rules to help us actively listen and gain understanding.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 12
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 7
Classroom Resources: 2
R2. Use knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word analysis skills to decode and encode words accurately.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R2.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Word-analysis skills
Knowledge:
R2. Students know:
  • Phoneme (sound) to grapheme (letter or letters) correspondences to encode (spell) words accurately.
  • Grapheme (letter or letters) to phoneme (sound) correspondences to decode (read) words accurately.
  • Word-analysis skills.
Skills:
R2. Students are able to:
  • Encode and decode words accurately using knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Encode and decode words accurately using word analysis skills.
Understanding:
R2. Students understand that:
  • Mapping graphemes to phonemes is essential for learning to read or decode words efficiently.
  • Mapping phonemes to graphemes is essential for learning to spell or encode words efficiently.
  • Analyzing a word's structure helps to read and spell a word.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
R3. Expand background knowledge and build vocabulary through discussion, reading, and writing.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R3.
  • Background knowledge
  • Vocabulary
  • Discussion
Knowledge:
R3. Students know:
  • Relating experiences through discussions, writing, and reading will help build background knowledge and improve vocabulary.
Skills:
R3. Students are able to:
  • Connect new concepts to prior experiences to increase background knowledge through discussions, reading, and writing.
  • Construct the meaning of words through discussions, reading, and writing.
Understanding:
R3. Students understand that:
  • Background knowledge can increase by relating experiences to new ideas, topics, and words while participating in discussions, reading, and writing.
  • Vocabulary will increase by constructing the meaning of words while participating in discussions, reading, and writing.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
R4. Use digital and electronic tools appropriately, safely, and ethically for research and writing, both individually and collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R4.
  • Digital tools
  • Electronic tools
  • Appropriately
  • Safely
  • Ethically
  • Research
  • Individually
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
R4. Students know:
  • Digital and electronic tools must be used appropriately, safely, and ethically.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be used for research or for writing tasks.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be independently or with others.
Skills:
R4. Students are able to:
  • Engage in safe and ethical behavior when using digital and electronic tools individually and collaboratively.
Understanding:
R4. Students understand that:
  • Safe behaviors, interactions that keep you out of harm's way, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
  • Ethical behavior, interactions that align to one's moral code, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 14
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 4
Classroom Resources: 7
R5. Utilize a writing process to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writings in various genres.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R5.
  • Writing process
  • Plan
  • Draft
  • Revise
  • Edit
  • Publish
  • Genres
Knowledge:
R5. Students know:
  • The writing process steps are to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish.
  • Various genres of writing.
Skills:
R5. Students are able to:
  • Plan writings in various genres.
  • Draft writings in various genres.
  • Revise writings in various genres.
  • Edit writings in various genres.
  • Publish writings in various genres.
Understanding:
R5. Students understand that:
  • The writing process is a set of steps that make writing easier.
  • There are different categories, or genres, of writing that can be used for different purposes.
Literacy Foundations
Oral Language
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 0
1. Engage in collaborative discussions about topics and texts with peers and adults in small and large groups, utilizing agreed-upon rules.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
1.
  • Engage
  • Collaborative discussions
  • Rules
Knowledge:
1. Students know:
  • The purpose of collaborative discussions about topics and texts.
  • Agreed-upon rules for discussions.
Skills:
1. Students are able to:
  • Listen attentively to conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts.
  • Add to conversations about grade-appropriate topics and texts.
  • Take turns speaking.
  • Respond to the comments of others.
  • Extend conversations.
  • Converse with peers and adults.
  • Converse in small and large groups.
  • Ask clarifying questions.
Understanding:
1. Students understand that:
  • Collaborative discussions occur when participants actively listen, build on others' ideas, and ask clarifying questions.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 0
2. Actively participate in shared reading experiences and collaborative discussions to build background knowledge and learn how oral reading should sound.

Examples: read-alouds, oral dramatic activities
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
2.
  • Participate
  • Shared reading
  • Background knowledge
  • Oral reading
Knowledge:
2. Students know:
  • The process of shared reading experiences and collaborative discussions.
  • Shared reading and collaborative discussions can increase their background knowledge.
  • How fluent oral reading sounds.
Skills:
2. Students are able to:
  • Participate in shared reading and discussions to build background knowledge and learn new information.
  • Describe how oral reading should sound.
Understanding:
2. Students understand that:
  • Actively participating in shared reading experiences and collaborative discussions can build their background knowledge.
  • Listening to others read aloud can help improve their oral reading skills.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 1
3. Ask and answer questions to seek help, get information, or clarify information to confirm understanding in response to information presented in audible, text, or digital format.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
3.
  • Information
  • Clarify
  • Audible
  • Digital format
Knowledge:
3. Students know:
  • Questions to seek help.
  • Questions to get information.
  • Questions to clarify information.
Skills:
3. Students are able to:
  • Ask and answer questions to seek help, get information, or clarify information to confirm understanding in response to information presented in audible, text, or digital format.
Understanding:
3. Students understand that:
  • They can get help, learn new information, or express information they know or have learned by asking and answering questions, depending on the task at hand.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 6
Classroom Resources: 1
4. Present information orally using complete sentences and appropriate volume.

a. Orally describe people, places, things, and events, expressing ideas with relevant details.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
4.
  • Present
  • Complete sentences
  • Appropriate volume
4a.
  • Describe
  • Express ideas
  • Relevant details
Knowledge:
4. Students know:
  • How to orally present information using appropriate communication skills.
4a.
  • How to orally present relevant details to express descriptions of people, places, things, or events.
Skills:
4. Students are able to:
  • Speak in complete sentences and use appropriate volume to present information orally.
4a.
  • Clearly describe people, places, things, and events.
  • Use relevant details in descriptions.
  • Express ideas clearly.
Understanding:
4. Students understand that:
  • To communicate clearly, a speaker should use complete sentences and a voice volume that can be heard by the audience.
4a.
  • Relevant details and clearly expressed ideas enhances oral descriptions of people, places, things, and events.
Concepts of Print
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
5. Locate a book's title, table of contents, glossary, and the names of author(s) and illustrator(s).

a. Explain the roles of author(s) and illustrator(s).
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Concepts of Print
Teacher Vocabulary:
5.
  • Title
  • Table of contents
  • Glossary
  • Author
  • Illustrator
5a.
  • Roles of author
  • Roles of illustrator
Knowledge:
5. Students know:
  • Text features, such as title, table of contents, glossary, and the names of author(s) and Illustrator(s).
5a.
  • The role of the author of a text.
  • The role of the illustrator of a text.
Skills:
5. Students are able to:
  • Locate a book's title, table of contents, glossary, and the names of author(s) and illustrator(s).
5a.
  • Explain the role of an author.
  • Explain the role of an illustrator.
Understanding:
5. Students understand that:
  • Text has predictable features that help readers locate information.
5a.
  • The words of a text communicate an author's intended message.
  • The illustrations in a text communicate the illustrator's intended message.
Phonological Awareness/Phonemic Awareness
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 11
Classroom Resources: 11
6. Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Count, blend, segment, and delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.

Examples: par-ti-cu-lar, cer-ti-fi-cate

b. Recognize and produce groups of rhyming words and distinguish them from non-rhyming groups of spoken words.

c. Produce alliterative words.

d. Blend and segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.

e. Add, delete, and substitute phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, and produce the resulting word.

Examples: pan to pant; flight to light; cat to cap

f. Distinguish long from short vowel sounds in spoken, single-syllable words.

g. Distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and commonly-confused cognate consonant sounds, using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation.

Examples: /f/ and /v/, /p/ and /b/, /t/ and /d/, /k/ and /g/, /m/ and /n/, /ng/ and /n/, /s/ and /z/, unvoiced /th/ and voiced /th/, /ch/ and /sh/, /ĕ/ and /ā/, /ĕ/ and /ă/

Note: This is extremely important as a foundational phonemic awareness skill for all learners.

h. Identify the sound substitution in words with five to six phonemes.

Example: strips/straps, square/squire
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonological Awareness/Phonemic Awareness
Teacher Vocabulary:
6.
  • Demonstrate
  • Phonological awareness skills
  • Phonemic awareness skills
  • Spoken words
6a.
  • Count
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Delete
  • Syllables
  • Spoken words
  • Polysyllabic words
6b.
  • Recognize
  • Produce
  • Rhyming words
  • Distinguish
  • Non-rhyming
6c.
  • Alliterative
6d.
  • Blend
  • Segment
  • Phonemes
  • Single-syllable spoken words
  • Consonant blends
6e.
  • Add
  • Delete
  • Substitute
  • Phonemes
6f.
  • Vowel
  • Long Vowel Sound
  • Short Vowel Sound
  • Single-syllable spoken words
6g.
  • Distinguish
  • Vowel sounds
  • Cognate consonant sounds
  • Mouth position
  • Voiced sounds
  • Unvoiced sounds
  • Articulation
6h.
  • Substitution
  • Phonemes
Knowledge:
6. Students know:
  • Basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills.
6a.
  • Syllables in spoken words.
  • Polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • The features of rhyming words.
  • The features of non-rhyming words.
6c.
  • The features of alliterative words.
6d.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Consonant blends.
6e.
  • Phonemes in single-syllable spoken words.
  • Phonemes in spoken words can be manipulated.
6f.
  • Long vowel sounds.
  • Short vowel sounds.
6g.
  • Vowel sounds.
  • Cognate consonant sounds.
  • The mouth position, voicing, and manner of articulation of speech sounds.
6h.
  • Sound substitution.
Skills:
6. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate basic to advanced phonological and phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.
6a.
  • Count syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Blend syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Segment syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
  • Delete syllables in spoken words, including polysyllabic words.
6b.
  • Recognize groups of rhyming words.
  • Produce groups of rhyming words.
  • Distinguish groups of non-rhyming words from groups of rhyming words.
6c.
  • Produce alliterative words.
6d.
  • Blend phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
  • Segment phonemes in single-syllable spoken words made up of three to five phonemes, including words with consonant blends.
6e. Using spoken words made up of three to five phonemes,
  • Add phonemes at the beginning or end of a word and produce the resulting word, such as changing pan to pant.
  • Delete phonemes at the beginning or end of a word to produce the resulting word, such as changing flight to light.
  • Substitute phonemes at the beginning or end to produce the resulting word, such as changing cat to cap.
6f.
  • Identify long vowel sounds.
  • Identify short vowel sounds.
  • Distinguish between long and short vowel sounds in spoken words.
6g.
  • Using knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation, distinguish between commonly-confused vowel sounds and cognate consonant sounds.
6h.
  • In words with five to six phonemes, identify sound substitutions, such as identifying the vowel sound changed in the word pair strips/straps.
Understanding:
6. Students understand that:
  • Being able to identify and manipulate the sounds in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6a.
  • Being able to to identify and manipulate syllables in spoken words will help improve their reading, spelling, and writing abilities.
6b.
  • Words that rhyme have the same vowel and ending sound.
6c.
  • Alliterative words begin with the same sound.
6d.
  • Blending is the ability to hear the individual sounds in a spoken word, join the sounds together, and produce the word.
  • Segmenting is the ability to break words down into their individual sounds.
6e.
  • Adding, deleting, and substituting phonemes at the beginning or end of spoken words changes the resulting word.
6f.
  • One letter can make different sounds depending on its context.
  • When a letter makes the sound of its letter name, it is considered a long vowel.
  • When a letter makes a sound other than its name, it is considered a short vowel.
6g.
  • The knowledge of mouth position, voiced and unvoiced sounds, and manner of articulation is required for the proper pronunciation of words.
  • The ability to distinguish commonly-confused sounds will help them become better readers, spellers, and writers.
6h.
  • A word's meaning and pronunciation will be altered if one sound is changed.
Phonics
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 3
Classroom Resources: 6
7. Apply knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word analysis skills to decode and encode words accurately both in isolation and within decodable, grade-appropriate texts.

a. Produce the most frequent sound(s) for each letter of the alphabet, including x, q, and the long and short sounds of the vowels.

Examples: x= /ks/; q=/kw/; a=/ă/ and /ā/, s= /s/ and /z/

b. Decode and encode regularly-spelled, one-syllable words with closed syllables, open syllables, and vowel-consonant-e syllables, including words with blends in initial and final position.

Note: Consonant blends should include st-, sm-, sn-, -st, -ft, -lp, sl, cr, cl, tr, dr, nt, nd, mp, and nk, at a minimum.

c. Decode words with digraphs, trigraphs, and combinations, including digraphs ck, sh, th, ch, wh, ph, ng, trigraphs tch and dge, and combination qu.

Note: Some programs/experts call wh a combination, others call it a digraph. Use common language across the school/district.

d. Decode words with a after w read /ä/ and a before l read /â/.

Examples: wash, water, wasp; tall, all, talk, small, fall

e. With prompting and support, decode words with the hard and soft sounds of c and g, in context and in isolation.

Examples: c=/k/ before a, o, u, or any consonant and c= /s/ before i, e, or y; g=/g/before a, o, u, or any consonant and g=/j/ before i, e, or y

f. Decode words with vowel y in the final position of one and two syllable words, distinguishing the difference between the long /ī/ sound in one-syllable words and the long /ē/ sound in two-syllable words, and words with vowel y in medial position, producing the short /ĭ/ sound for these words.

Examples: fly, my; baby, happy; myth, gym

g. Decode regularly spelled one-syllable words with vowel-r syllables, including ar, er, ir, or, and ur.

h. With prompting and support, decode words with common vowel team syllables, including ai, ay, ee, ea, igh, ie, oa, ou, ow, au, aw, oe, oo, ew, oi, oy, and ue.

i. With prompting and support, decode words that follow the -ild, -ost, -old, -olt, and -ind patterns.

Examples: mild, host, fold, jolt, kind

j. With prompting and support, decode two-syllable words using knowledge of closed syllables, open syllables, vowel-consonant-e syllables, vowel-r syllables, common vowel team syllables, and consonant-le syllables, including compound words that fit multiple syllable types.

k. With prompting and support, decode words with silent letter combinations.

Examples: kn, wr, mb, gh, gn

l. With prompting and support, decode words with common prefixes including un-, dis-, in-, re-, pre-, mis-, non-, and ex-.

m. With prompting and support, decode words with common suffixes, including words with dropped e and y-to-i changes for suffix addition.

Examples: -s, -ed, -ing, -es, -er, -est, -en, -y, -ly

n. Decode contractions with am, is, has, and not.

Examples: I'm, he's, she's, isn't, don't

o. Decode grade-appropriate high frequency words that are spelled using predictable, decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences.

Examples: saw, all, made, can, his, walk, let, open, time
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
7.
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Word-analysis skills
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Isolation
  • Decodable, grade-appropriate texts
7a.
  • Frequent sounds
  • Long vowel sounds
  • Short vowel sounds
7b.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Regularly-spelled
  • One-syllable words
  • Closed syllables
  • Open syllables
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllables
  • Blends
  • Initial position
  • Final position
7c.
  • Decode
  • Digraphs
  • Trigraphs
  • Combinations
7d.
  • Decode
7e.
  • Decode
  • Hard sounds
  • Soft sounds
  • Prompting
  • Support
7f.
  • Decode
  • Vowel y
  • Medial position
  • Final position
  • One-syllable words
  • Two-syllable words
  • Long /ī/ sound
  • Long /ē/ sound
  • Short /ĭ/ sound
7g.
  • Decode
  • One-syllable words
  • vowel-r syllables
7h.
  • Decode
  • Common vowel team syllables
  • Prompting
  • Support
7i.
  • Decode
  • Patterns
  • Prompting
  • Support
7j.
  • Two-syllable words
  • Closed syllable
  • Open syllables
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllables
  • vowel-r syllables
  • Common vowel team syllables
  • Consonant-le syllables
  • Compound words
  • Prompting
  • Support
7k.
  • Decode
  • Silent letter combinations
  • Prompting
  • Support
7l.
  • Decode
  • Common prefixes
  • Prompting
  • Support
7m.
  • Decode
  • Common suffixes
  • Suffix addition
  • Prompting
  • Support
7n.
  • Decode
  • Contractions
7o.
  • Decode
  • Grade-appropriate high frequency words
  • Predictable
  • Decodable
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
Knowledge:
7. Students know:
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Word-analysis skills.
7a.
  • Letter sounds.
  • Long and short vowel sounds.
7b.
  • Regularly-spelled, one-syllable words.
  • Letter patterns for closed syllables, open syllables, and vowel-consonant-e syllables.
  • Words with blends in the initial and/or final position.
7c.
  • Digraphs, including ck, sh, th, ch, wh, ph, and ng.
  • Trigraphs, including tch and dge.
  • Combination qu.
7d.
  • The sound a makes when it occurs after w.
  • The sound a makes when it occurs before l.
7e.
  • The hard sound of c is /k/.
  • The soft sound of c is /s/.
  • The hard sound of g is /g/.
  • The soft sound of g is /j/.
7f.
  • The letter y can make three vowel sounds depending on the number of syllables in the words and its position in a word.
7g.
  • Regularly spelled one-syllable words with vowel-r syllables.
7h.
  • Common vowel team syllables.
7i.
  • Words that follow the -ild, -ost, -old, -olt, and -ind patterns.
7j.
  • Two-syllable words, including compound words.
  • The features of a closed syllable.
  • The features of an open syllable.
  • The features of a vowel-consonant-e syllable.
  • The features of a vowel-r syllable.
  • The features of common vowel team syllables.
  • The features of a consonant-le syllable.
7k.
  • Silent letter combinations, such as kn, wr, mb, gh, gn.
7l.
  • Common prefixes.
7m.
  • Common suffixes, such as -s, -ed, -ing, -es, -er, -est, -en, -y, -ly.
  • Suffix addition patterns.
  • 7n.
    • Contractions with am, is, has, and not, such as I'm, he's, she's, isn't, don't.
    7o.
    • Grade-appropriate high frequency words that are spelled using predictable, decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences, such as saw, all, made, can, his, walk, let, open, time.
    Skills:
    7. Students are able to:
    In isolation and within decodable, grade-appropriate texts,
    • Decode and encode words by applying phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    • Decode and encode words using word-analysis skills.
    7a.
    • Produce the most frequent sounds for each letter of the alphabet, including x and q.
    • Produce long and short vowel sounds.
    7b. Using regularly-spelled, one-syllable words,
    • Decode and encode closed syllable words.
    • Decode and encode open syllable words.
    • Decode and encode vowel-consonant-e syllable words.
    • Decode and encode words with blends in the initial and/or final position.
    7c.
    • Decode words with digraphs.
    • Decode words with trigraphs.
    • Decode words with combination qu.
    7d.
    • Decode words with a after w, such as wash, water, wasp.
    • Decode words with a before l, such as tall, all, talk, small, fall.
    7e. With prompting and support,
    • Decode (read) words with the hard and soft sounds of c and g, in context and in isolation.
    7f.
    • Decode (read) words with vowel y in the final position of one and two syllable words.
    • Distinguish the difference between the long /ī/ sound in one-syllable words (like fly and my) and the long /ē/ sound in two-syllable words (like baby and happy).
    • Decode (read) words with vowel y in medial position, such as myth and gym.
    7g.
    • Decode (read) regularly spelled one-syllable words with vowel-r syllables.
    7h.
    • With prompting and support, decode (read) words with common vowel team syllables, including ai, ay, ee, ea, igh, ie, oa, ou, ow, au, aw, oe, oo, ew, oi, oy, and ue.
    7i.
    • With prompting and support, decode (read) words that follow the -ild, -ost, -old, -olt, and -ind patterns, such as mild, host, fold, jolt, kind.
    7j. With prompting and support,
    • Decode (read) two-syllable words by breaking the words into syllables and using their knowledge of syllable types.
    • Decode compound words that fit multiple syllable types by breaking the word into syllables and using their knowledge of syllable types.
    7k.
    • With prompting and support, decode (read) words with silent letter combinations.
    7l.
    • With prompting and support, decode (read) words with common prefixes including un-, dis-, in-, re-, pre-, mis-, non-, and ex-.
    7m.
    • With prompting and support, decode (read) words with common suffixes, including words with dropped e and y-to-i changes for suffix addition.
    7n.
    • Decode (read) contractions with am, is, has, and not.
    7o.
    • Decode grade-appropriate high frequency words that are spelled using predictable, decodable phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    Understanding:
    7. Students understand that:
    • Graphemes (letter symbols) represent specific phonemes (sounds) they can use to decode (read) words.
    • Phonemes (speech sounds) can be represented by graphemes (letter symbols) to encode (spell) words.
    • Word-analysis skills are used to determine how to decode or encode based on position, adjacent letters, etc.
    7a.
    • Each letter of the alphabet makes at least one speech sound.
    • x and q make two speech sounds (x=/ks/ and q=/kw/).
    • Vowels can make a long or short speech sounds.
    7b.
    • Knowing letter patterns within each syllable type will help them decode and encode words quickly and accurately.
    7c.
    • A digraph is a two-letter combination that represents a single phoneme in which neither letter makes its usual sound.
    • A trigraph is a three-letter combination that represents one phoneme.
    • In English words, q and u always occur together, and combination qu represents two sounds /k/ and /w/.
    7d.
    • Adjacent letters and letter position within a word can change the sound a letter produces.
    7e.
    • The letter that follows a c or g determines the sound that c or g will make in a word.
    • C makes a hard sound when it comes before a, o, u, or any consonant, and it makes a soft sound when it comes before i, e, or y.
    • G makes a hard sound when it comes before a, o, u, or any consonant, and it makes a soft sound when it comes before i, e, or y.
    7f.
    • Y can make three vowel sounds: long /ī/, long /ē/, and short /ĭ/.
    • The position of the vowel y in the word determines how the y is pronounced.
    7g.
    • In words that contain the vowel-r syllable type, the sound of the vowel usually changes.
    7h.
    • A vowel team is a combination of two, three, or four letters that make a vowel sound.
    • A vowel team syllable always begins with a vowel, and it could be followed by another vowel(s) or consonant(s).
    7i.
    • Long-vowel sounds will be produced in words that have the patterns of -ild, -ost, -old, -olt, and -ind.
    7j.
    • They can decode two-syllable words, including compound words, by dividing a word into syllables and using their knowledge of the syllable types.
    7k.
    • Some words they read will have silent letter combinations in which one or more letters are silent (doesn't represent a phoneme) but another letter in the combination does represent the phoneme.
    7l.
    • Identifying common prefixes in words can help them read polysyllabic words quickly and accurately.
    7m.
    • They can read words with common suffixes, including words with suffixes that are spelled by dropping the e and changing the y-to-i for suffix addition, by recognizing common letter patterns.
    7n.
    • Contractions are made up of two words that are shortened by combining the two words and replacing the omitted letters with an apostrophe.
    7o.
    • High frequency words are words that appear in text often, so it is important to be able to read them accurately and automatically.
    • Words can be decoded using their knowledge of letter-sound relationships.
    Fluency
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 10
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 9
    8. Apply previously-taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences to decodable words with accuracy and automaticity, in and out of context.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    8.
    • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
    • Decodable words
    • Accuracy
    • Automaticity
    • In context
    • Out of context
    Knowledge:
    8.
    • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences in decodable words.
    • Accuracy is getting something correct, and automaticity is reading the word quickly without having to sound it out.
    Skills:
    8. Students are able to:
    • Accurately and automatically decode words by applying previously-taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences, in and out of context.
    Understanding:
    8. Students understand that:
    • Fluent readers use known phoneme-grapheme correspondences to decode words correctly and quickly.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 3
    Learning Activities: 1
    Classroom Resources: 2
    9. Read grade-appropriate texts with accuracy and fluency.

    a. Read and reread grade-appropriate decodable text orally with accuracy and expression at an appropriate rate to support comprehension.

    b. Recognize and self-correct decoding and other errors in word recognition and reread for clarification.

    c. Participate in poetry reading, noticing phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme.

    Example: Pause between stanzas and between lines where punctuation indicates.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    9.
    • Grade-appropriate texts
    • Accuracy
    • Fluency
    9a.
    • Reread
    • Grade-appropriate decodable text
    • Accuracy
    • Expression
    • Appropriate rate
    • Comprehension
    9b.
    • Recognize
    • Self-correct
    • Decoding errors
    • Word recognition
    • Clarification
    9c.
    • Participate
    • Poetry
    • Phrasing
    • Rhythm
    • Rhyme
    Knowledge:
    9. Students know:
    • Accurate reading is correctly decoding words.
    • Fluent reading is reading at a rate that supports their overall understanding of the text.
    9a.
    • Reading accurately, with expression, and at an appropriate rate will support comprehension.
    9b.
    • Decoding errors.
    • Word recognition errors.
    9c.
    • The features of poetry, including phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme.
    Skills:
    9. Students are able to:
    • Read grade-appropriate texts accurately and fluently.
    9a.
    • Read orally with accuracy.
    • Read orally with expression.
    • Read orally at an appropriate rate.
    • Comprehend text that is read orally.
    9b.
    • Recognize decoding and word recognition errors.
    • Recognize when their understanding of the text breaks down.
    • Reread for clarification.
    • Self-correct decoding and word recognition errors.
    9c.
    • Read poetry.
    • Identify phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme in poetry readings.
    Understanding:
    9. Students understand that:
    • To make meaning of text, they must accurately decode words and read at a rate that supports their comprehension.
    9a.
    • Fluent readers accurately decode words in text, read text with expression, and read at an appropriate rate in order to comprehend the text.
    9b.
    • Fluent readers recognize when their understanding of the text breaks down and take action to understand the text by rereading for clarification.
    9c.
    • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    10. Read high-frequency words commonly found in grade-appropriate text.

    Note: High-frequency words should be taught with the main emphasis of the lesson being on regular correspondences and patterns within the word. The student should be able to read the word accurately and independently three times in a row on different days to be considered accurate enough to add to a personal word box, word ring, or fluency folder for fluency practice. Avoid teaching high-frequency words as "sight words" that need to be memorized as a whole word, unless there are no regular correspondences in the word. "Of" is an example of a word with no regular correspondences.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    10.
    • High-frequency words
    • Grade-appropriate text
    Knowledge:
    10. Students know:
    • High frequency words that are common found in first-grade level text.
    Skills:
    10. Students are able to:
    • Read high-frequency words in first grade-level text accurately and independently three times in a row on different days.
    Understanding:
    10. Students understand that:
    • High-frequency words are words that are found regularly in grade-appropriate text, so it is important to learn to read them automatically, accurately, and independently.
    Vocabulary
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    11. Utilize new academic, content-specific, grade-level vocabulary, make connections to previously learned words, and relate new words to background knowledge.

    a. Make connections to a word's structure using knowledge of phonology, morphology, and orthography of the word to aid learning.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    11.
    • Utilize
    • Academic vocabulary
    • Content-specific vocabulary
    • Grade-level vocabulary
    • Connections
    • Relate
    • Background knowledge
    11a.
    • Word's structure
    • Phonology
    • Morphology
    • Orthography
    Knowledge:
    11. Students know:
    • Academic, content-specific, grade-level vocabulary words.
    • Content-specific vocabulary refers to words used in different subjects learned in school such as reading, math, social studies, science.
    • New vocabulary words can be learned by relating them to previously learned words and background knowledge.
    11a.
    • Phonology (speech sounds within words).
    • Morphology (meaningful units of words).
    • Orthography (the written representation of language).
    Skills:
    11. Students are able to:
    • Utilize grade-appropriate vocabulary.
    • Make connections to previous learned vocabulary words.
    • Relate new vocabulary words to background knowledge.
    11a.
    • Make connections to a word's structure using speech sounds, meaningful word parts, and spelling of the word to aid learning.
    Understanding:
    11. Students understand that:
    • Their current vocabulary and background knowledge can help them determine the meaning of new vocabulary words.
    11a.
    • Identifying a word's phonological, morphological, and orthographic structure can help them determine the meaning of a word, as well as the word's origin.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 20
    Lesson Plans: 6
    Classroom Resources: 14
    12. Ask and answer questions about unfamiliar words and phrases in discussions and/or text.

    a. Identify possessives and plurals and use them as clues to the meaning of text.

    Example: Jack's coat, mom's car; pigs, pig's, pigs'

    b. Identify meaningful parts of words (morphemes) and use them as clues to the meaning of unknown words, including frequently occurring affixes and inflections -s, -es, -ed, -ing, -er, and -est.

    Examples: Explain that adding suffix -s changes a singular noun to a plural noun and adding suffix -ed changes a verb to past tense.

    c. Describe word relationships and nuances in word meanings, including relating them to their opposites and distinguishing shades of meaning in similar or related words.

    Examples: look, peek, glance, stare, glare; big, large, gigantic, monstrous
    Act out tiptoe, creep, and march to distinguish shades of meaning in words related to walk.
    Discuss synonyms and antonyms.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    12.
    • Unfamiliar words
    • Unfamiliar phrases
    • Discussions
    • Text
    12a.
    • Identify
    • Possessives
    • Plurals
    • Meaning of text
    12b.
    • Meaningful word parts
    • Morphemes
    • Unknown words
    • Affixes
    • Inflections
    12c.
    • Word relationships
    • Nuances in word meanings
    • Opposites
    • Shades of meaning
    • Similar or related words
    Knowledge:
    12. Students know:
    • Strategies for identifying unfamiliar words and phrases in discussions and/or text.
    • Several question stems related to unfamiliar words or phrases in discussions and/or text.
    • Techniques for clarifying unfamiliar words and phrases in discussions and/or text.
    12a.
    • The features of possessive nouns.
    • The features of plural nouns.
    12b.
    • Words are made of meaningful word parts called morphemes.
    • Morphemes can provide clues about the meaning of a word.
    12c.
    • Word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
    Skills:
    12. Students are able to:
    • Identify unfamiliar words and phrases.
    • Ask questions about unfamiliar words and phrases.
    • Answer questions about unfamiliar words and phrases.
    • Clarify meaning of words and phrases through questions.
    12a.
    • Identify possessives and plurals of words, such as pigs, pig's, pigs'.
    • Use the possessives and plurals of a word to determine the meaning of a text, like Jack's coat, mom's car.
    12b.
    • Recognize meaningful parts of words (morphemes).
    • Utilize morphemes as clues to identify the meaning of unknown words.
    • Use affixes as clues to the meaning of unknown words.
    • Identify frequently occurring root words and their inflectional forms.
    12c.
    • Describe word relationships and slight variations in meaning, such as look, peek, glance, stare, glare; big, large, gigantic, monstrous.
    • Describe word relationships by relating words of opposite meanings (antonyms) and similar meanings (synonyms).
    • Distinguish shades of meaning in related words, like acting out tiptoe, creep, and march to distinguish nuances in words related to walk.
    Understanding:
    12. Students understand that:
    • It is important to ask questions about unfamiliar words and phrases to clarify the meaning of new vocabulary words.
    12a.
    • Making a word possessive or plural changes the meaning of a text.
    12b.
    • Identifying root words and affixes provide clues to the meaning of unknown words and phrases.
    12c.
    • Writers and speakers should carefully select words to convey specific meanings, ideas, and relationships.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    13. Use information found within the text to determine the meaning of an unfamiliar or multiple-meaning word or phrase.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    13.
    • Unfamiliar
    • Multiple-meaning
    • Word
    • Phrase
    Knowledge:
    13. Students know:
    • Information within a text can help them determine the meaning of an unfamiliar or multiple-meaning word or phrase.
    Skills:
    13. Students are able to:
    • Use information found in text to determine the meaning of words or phrases that are unknown or that have multiple meanings.
    Understanding:
    13. Students understand that:
    • They should use information found in a text to determine the meaning of unfamiliar or multiple-meaning words or phrases.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    14. Sort and categorize groups of words or pictures based on meaning, and label each category.

    Examples: colors, clothes, animals with wings
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    14.
    • Sort
    • Categorize
    • Groups of words
    • Pictures
    • Meaning
    • Label
    • Category
    Knowledge:
    14. Students know:
    • Words can be categorized based on their meaning.
    • Categories can be labeled by topic or concept.
    Skills:
    14. Students are able to:
    • Sort groups of words or pictures into categories based on meaning.
    • Label category based on meaning, such as colors, clothes, animals with wings.
    Understanding:
    14. Students understand that:
    • Words or concepts can be sorted into particular categories based on their meaning and their relationships to other words or concepts.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    15. Identify and explain adjectives as descriptive words and phrases in all forms of texts, including poems.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    15.
    • Identify
    • Explain
    • Adjectives
    • Descriptive words
    • Descriptive phrases
    • Poems
    Knowledge:
    15. Students know:
    • Adjectives are descriptive words or phrases that occur in all genres of text.
    Skills:
    15. Students are able to:
    • Identify adjectives in all forms of texts, including poems.
    • Explain the meaning of adjectives as descriptive words and phrases in all forms of text, including poems.
    Understanding:
    15. Students understand that:
    • Adjectives are a type of word that are used to describe nouns in all forms of text.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 8
    Lesson Plans: 5
    Classroom Resources: 3
    16. Use grade-appropriate academic vocabulary in speaking and writing.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    16.
    • Grade-appropriate academic vocabulary
    • Speaking
    • Writing
    Knowledge:
    16. Students know:
    • Grade-appropriate academic vocabulary in spoken and written forms.
    Skills:
    16. Students are able to:
    • Identify grade-appropriate academic vocabulary.
    • Use grade-appropriate academic vocabulary in speaking and writing.
    Understanding:
    16. Students understand that:
    • Using grade-appropriate academic vocabulary expands their knowledge.
    • Academic vocabulary is more formal than their spoken, conversational language.
    • Building our vocabulary helps us to clearly express our ideas and share information with others.
    Comprehension
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 4
    Lesson Plans: 4
    17. Use content knowledge built during read-alouds of informational and literary texts by participating in content-specific discussions with peers and/or through drawing and writing.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    17.
    • Content knowledge
    • Read-alouds
    • Informational text
    • Literary text
    • Participating
    • Content-specific discussions
    • Peers
    • Drawing
    • Writing
    Knowledge:
    17. Students know:
    • Content knowledge can be learned from read-alouds of informational and literary texts.
    • Content knowledge can be shared with others through discussions, drawing, or writing.
    Skills:
    17. Students are able to:
    • Gain new content knowledge by engaging in read-alouds of informational and literary texts.
    • Participate in discussions with their peers demonstrating their knowledge of content-specific topics.
    • Produce drawings or writing that displays content knowledge learned through read-alouds.
    Understanding:
    17. Students understand that:
    • They can learn new information by engaging in read-alouds of informational and literary texts.
    • They can demonstrate their understanding of content-specific knowledge through discussions, drawing, or writing.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    18. Manipulate words and/or phrases to create simple sentences, including declarative and interrogative, to help build syntactic awareness and comprehension at the sentence level.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    18.
    • Manipulate
    • Words
    • Phrases
    • Simple sentences
    • Declarative
    • Interrogative
    • Syntactic awareness
    • Comprehension
    • Sentence level
    Knowledge:
    18. Students know:
    • The components of simple sentences.
    • Features of declarative and interrogative sentences.
    Skills:
    18. Students are able to:
    • Manipulate words/or phrases to create simple sentences, including declarative and interrogative.
    • Demonstrate syntactic awareness.
    • Demonstrate comprehension at the sentence level.
    Understanding:
    18. Students understand that:
    • Our language system has rules about correct word order in sentences, which is called syntax.
    • They can change the meaning of a sentence by changing the order of words in the sentence.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    19. Identify common types of texts and their features, including literary, informational, fairy tale, and poetry.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    19.
    • Texts
    • Features
    • Literary text
    • Informational text
    • Fairy tale
    • Poetry
    Knowledge:
    19. Students know:
    • The features of common types of texts.
    Skills:
    19. Students are able to:
    • Identify common types of texts and their features, including literary, informational, fairy tale, and poetry.
    Understanding:
    19. Students understand that:
    • Texts can be categorized based on predictable features.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 3
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    20. Use text features to locate key facts or information in printed or digital text.

    Examples: headings, tables of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons, bold words, captions, illustrations
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    20.
    • Text features
    • Key facts
    • Information
    • Printed text
    • Digital text
    Knowledge:
    20. Students know:
    • Text features that help locate key facts or information include headings, table of contents, glossaries, electronic menus, icons, bold words, captions, and illustrations.
    • Text features can be present in printed text or digital text.
    Skills:
    20. Students are able to:
    • Use text features to locate key facts or information in printed or digital text.
    Understanding:
    20. Students understand that:
    • Text contains predictable features that can be used to locate key information in text.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 8
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 7
    21. Identify the main topic and key details of literary and informational texts.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    21.
    • Identify
    • Main topic
    • Key details
    • Literary texts
    • Informational texts
    Knowledge:
    21. Students know:
    • Main topic of literary and informational texts.
    • Key details of literary and informational texts.
    Skills:
    21. Students are able to:
    • Identify the main topic of literary and informational texts.
    • Identify key details of literary and informational texts.
    Understanding:
    21. Students understand that:
    • Literary and informational texts have a main idea and supporting details.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 10
    Classroom Resources: 10
    22. Ask and answer questions about key details in literary and informational texts.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    22.
    • Ask
    • Answer
    • Questions
    • Key details
    • Literary texts
    • Informational texts
    Knowledge:
    22. Students know:
    • Key details are present in literary and informational text.
    Skills:
    22. Students are able to:
    • Ask questions about key details in a literary and informational text.
    • Answer questions about key details in a literary and informational text.
    Understanding:
    22. Students understand that:
    • Literary and informational text include key details that must be understood to comprehend the text.
    • After reading a text, knowledge and understanding can be expanded by asking and answering questions.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 9
    Lesson Plans: 2
    Classroom Resources: 7
    23. Identify and describe the main story elements in a literary text.

    a. Describe the characters and settings, using illustrations and textual evidence from a story.

    b. Retell the plot or sequence of major events in chronological order.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    23.
    • Identify
    • Describe
    • Story elements
    • Literary text
    23a.
    • Describe
    • Characters
    • Settings
    • Illustrations
    • Textual evidence
    • Story
    23b.
    • Retell
    • Plot
    • Sequence
    • Major events
    • Chronological order
    Knowledge:
    23. Students know:
    • Main story elements in a literary text.
    23a.
    • Characters in a story.
    • Settings in a story.
    • Characters and settings in a story can be identified using information from the text or illustrations.
    23b.
    • Chronological order.
    • Techniques for retelling a literary text orally using key details./li>
    Skills:
    23. Students are able to:
    • Identify the main story elements in a text.
    • Describe the main story elements in a text.
    23a.
    • Identify characters in a story.
    • Identify the setting of a story.
    • Describe the characters of a story using illustrations and textual evidence.
    • Describe the setting of a story using illustrations and textual evidence.
    23b.
    • Identify major events in a story.
    • Retell the plot of a story in chronological order.
    Understanding:
    23. Students understand that:
    • Literary texts include predictable story elements, such as plot, characters, setting, conflict, and resolution, to help the reader to better comprehend the text.
    23a.
    • A story tells about a character's experience, and they can use information from the text or illustrations to identify and describe characters in a story.
    • The setting is the time and place that a story takes place, and they can identify and describe the setting by using information from the text or illustrations.
    23b.
    • The major events that occur in a story is called the plot of the story.
    • Chronological order means that a story has a timeline of events that occur in sequence from beginning to end.
    • They can demonstrate their comprehension of a story by describing its main events in chronological order.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    24. Identify who is telling the story, using evidence from the text.

    a. Use the term narrator to refer to the speaker who is telling the story.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    24.
    • Identify
    • Evidence
    • Text
    24a.
    • Term
    • Narrator
    • Refer
    • Speaker
    Knowledge:
    24. Students know:
    • Who is telling a story can be identified from information in the text.
    24a.
    • A narrator is the speaker who is telling the story.
    Skills:
    24. Students are able to:
    • Identify who is telling a story by using text evidence.
    24a.
    • Use the term narrator to refer to the speaker who is telling the story.
    Understanding:
    24. Students understand that:
    • Text evidence from a story can help them identify who is telling the story.
    24a.
    • The speaker telling the story is called the narrator.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    25. Describe connections between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information, including cause and effect, sequence, and problem and solution, in a literary text.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    25.
    • Describe
    • Connections
    • Individuals
    • Events
    • Ideas
    • Pieces of information
    • Cause and effect
    • Sequence
    • Problem and solution
    • Literary text
    Knowledge:
    25. Students know:
    • There are connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in literary text.
    • Literary text can have structure, such as cause and effect, sequence, and problem and solution.
    Skills:
    25. Students are able to:
    • Identify and describe connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in literary text.
    • Identify the cause and effect of an event in a literary text.
    • Identify the problem and the given solution in a literary text.
    • Summarize a story in sequence.
    Understanding:
    25. Students understand that:
    • Relations can be made between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a literary text.
    • Literary text can be structured in a variety of ways, including describing the cause and effect of a particular event, sequence (chronological order), or identifying a problem and potential solution.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    26. With prompting and support, use textual evidence to explain the central message or moral of a literary text.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    26.
    • Textual evidence
    • Explain
    • Central message
    • Moral
    • Literary text
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    26. Students know:
    • The central message or moral of a literary text can be identified using evidence from the text.
    Skills:
    26. Students are able to:
    With prompting and support,
    • Explain the central message or moral of a literary text using evidence from the text.
    Understanding:
    26. Students understand that:
    • A moral or central message is a lesson taught through the story, and they can identify the moral by using evidence from the text.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    27. Make predictions using information found within a literary text.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    27.
    • Predictions
    • Information
    • Literary text
    Knowledge:
    27. Students know:
    • Predictions can be made using information from a text.
    Skills:
    27. Students are able to:
    • Made predictions about what will happen next based on information in a literary text.
    Understanding:
    27. Students understand that:
    • A prediction is an educated guess for what will happen next in a story, and they can use information in the story to create predictions.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    28. Self-monitor comprehension of text by pausing to summarize or rereading for clarification when comprehension is lacking.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    28.
    • Self-monitor
    • Comprehension
    • Text
    • Summarize
    • Rereading
    • Clarification
    • Comprehension
    Knowledge:
    28. Students know:
    • Comprehension is the understanding of what is read.
    • Techniques to self-monitor comprehension.
    • Strategies to improve comprehension.
    Skills:
    28. Students are able to:
    • Self-monitor comprehension of text.
    • Pause their reading to summarize text to improve comprehension.
    • Reread for clarity to improve comprehension.
    Understanding:
    28. Students understand that:
    • Comprehension is understanding what is read.
    • They should monitor their comprehension as they read, and take action if their comprehension is lacking by pausing to summarize the text or rereading for clarification.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    29. Compare and contrast texts.

    a. Compare and contrast characters, settings, and major events in literary texts.

    b. Describe the connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in an informational text.

    c. Point out similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    29.
    • Compare
    • Contrast
    • Texts
    29a.
    • Compare
    • Contrast
    • Characters
    • Settings
    • Major events
    • Literary texts
    29b.
    • Describe
    • Connections
    • Individuals
    • Events
    • Ideas
    • Pieces of information
    • Informational text
    29c.
    • Similarities
    • Differences
    • Topic
    Knowledge:
    29. Students know:
    • Techniques to compare (similarities) and contrast (differences) two texts.
    29a.
    • Characters.
    • Settings.
    • Major events.
    • Literary texts.
    • Techniques to compare and contrast story elements in literary texts.
    29b.
    • There are often connections between individuals, events, ideas, or information in an informational text.
    29c.
    • Techniques to compare and contrast features of two texts.
    Skills:
    29. Students are able to:
    • Identify the similarities and differences in the text.
    29a.
    • Identify characters, settings, and major events in a literary text.
    • Compare (similarities) and contrast (differences) characters, settings, and major events in a literary text.
    29b.
    • Identify and describe connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in an informational text.
    29c.
    • Identify the similarities and differences between two texts on the same topic.
    Understanding:
    29. Students understand that:
    • They can improve their comprehension of texts by identifying similarities and differences between two texts.
    29a.
    • Comparing and contrasting characters, settings, and major events in a text helps them to better understand the meaning of the literary text.
    29b.
    • Connections can be made between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in informational text.
    • Connections describe how individuals, events, ideas, or information in informational text are similar or different.
    29c.
    • They can improve their comprehension of a topic by comparing and contrasting two texts on the topic.
    Writing
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 12
    Learning Activities: 2
    Lesson Plans: 7
    Classroom Resources: 3
    30. Write legibly, using proper pencil grip.

    a. Print upper and lowercase letters fluently, using proper approach strokes, letter formation, and line placement.

    b. Print first and last names using proper letter formation, capitalization, and punctuation.

    Examples: De'Andre McGill, Kim Mi-Sun, Juan de Jesus, Janie Parker

    c. Use lower case letters in the majority of written work, using capitals only when appropriate.

    d. Write letters of the English alphabet in alphabetical order from memory.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    30.
    • Legibly
    • Proper pencil grip
    30a.
    • Uppercase letters
    • Lowercase letters
    • Fluently
    • Proper approach strokes
    • Proper letter formation
    • Proper line placement
    30b.
    • Print
    • First names
    • Last names
    • Proper letter formation
    • Capitalization
    • Punctuation
    30c.
    • Lowercase letters
    • Majority
    • Written work
    • Capitals
    • Appropriate
    30d.
    • Letters
    • English alphabet
    • Alphabetical order
    • Memory
    Knowledge:
    30. Students know:
    • Proper pencil grip.
    • Legible letter formation.
    30a.
    • Approach strokes for upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Proper upper- and lowercase letter formation.
    • Line placement for upper- and lowercase letters.
    30b.
    • First and last names are capitalized.
    • Some first and last names have punctuation marks.
    30c.
    • Capitalization rules.
    30d.
      Letters of the Alphabet.
    • How to write each letter of the English alphabet.
    • Alphabetical order.
    Skills:
    30. Students are able to:
    • Write legibly.
    • Use proper pencil grip.
    30a.
    • Print upper- and lowercase letters fluently.
    • Use correct approach strokes to form upper- and lowercase letters.
    • Place upper- and lowercase letters correctly on a line.
    30b.
    • Identify first and last names.
    • Write first and last names using proper letter formation.
    • Capitalize appropriate letters in first and last names, such as Juan de Jesus or Janie Parker.
    • Punctuate first and last names when appropriate, such as De'Andre McGill or Kim Mi-Sun.
    30c.
    • Use capital and lowercase letters correctly when writing.
    30d.
    • Write letters of the alphabet in alphabetical order from memory.
    Understanding:
    30. Students understand that:
    • Proper pencil grip aids in writing legibly.
    • Writing legibly is required for clear written communication.
    30a.
    • Legible handwriting requires an approach stroke on the correct line and proper letter formation.
    30b.
    • Each person has a first and last name.
    • All names are proper nouns and should begin with a capital letter.
    • Some names use punctuation marks.
    30c.
    • Lowercase letters are used the majority of the time in written work, and there are specific capitalization rules to follow.
    30d.
    • The English alphabet has a particular order.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 6
    Learning Activities: 2
    Classroom Resources: 4
    31. Apply knowledge of grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences and spelling rules (or generalizations) to encode words accurately.

    a. Encode vowel-consonant (VC) and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words, while using some knowledge of basic position-based rules for spelling English words in closed syllables.

    Examples: /k/=k before i, e, or y as in kit; /k/= c before a, o, u, or any consonant as in cup, cat, cop; /k/= -ck after an accented short vowel as in duck, back, rock, pick, deck

    b. Encode consonant-vowel (CV) words using knowledge of open syllable patterns.

    Examples: he, me, she, go, no

    c. Encode words with two-consonant blends in beginning position, including blends that are commonly confused with other spellings, by distinguishing the placement and action of the lips, teeth, and tongue during articulation.

    Examples: cl, bl, sl, tr, cr, sk, st, sl, sm, sn, sp, sw, dr, br, bl

    Note: Many students spell the tr blend with digraph ch because of the confusion of the coarticulation of the /t/ and /r/ sounds. Many students spell the dr blend with the letter j because of the confusion of the coarticulation of the /d/ and /r/ sounds.

    d. Encode words with consonant digraphs using knowledge that one sound may be spelled with two letters.

    Examples: sh, th, ch, wh, ng, ck

    e. Encode words with vowel-consonant-e syllable patterns.

    Examples: hike, spike, joke, dime, make

    f. With prompting and support, encode words with the common vowel teams and diphthongs.

    Examples: ee, ea, oa, ai, a, au, aw, oi, oy, ou, ow, oo, igh

    g. With prompting and support, encode words with vowel-r combinations ar, or, er, ir, and ur.

    h. With prompting and support, encode words with final /ch/ sound spelled -ch and -tch.

    Examples: /ch/= ch after a consonant, vowel-r, or vowel team as in munch, bunch, porch, smooch
    /ch/= tch after a short vowel sound as in hatch, crutch, ditch

    i. With prompting and support, encode words with final /f/, /l/, and /s/ sounds in one-syllable base words by doubling the final consonant when it follows a short vowel sound.
    Examples: cliff, hill, pass

    j. Encode words with final /v/ sound, using knowledge that no English word ends with a v.

    Examples: have, give, save

    k. Encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.

    Examples: am, at, can, he, we, be, in, it, came, like

    l. Encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences and patterns in all but one position, pointing out the part of the word that does not follow the regular pattern.

    Examples: said, are, to

    m. Encode words with suffixes -s, -es, -ing, -ed, -er, and -est.

    Examples: dogs, wishes, jumping, jumped, faster, fastest

    n. With prompting and support, encode words with common prefixes re-, un-, and mis-.

    o. With prompting and support, encode frequently confused homophones, using knowledge of English and meaning to facilitate learning.

    Examples: hear/here; for/four; to/too/two.

    Note: To is a preposition which begins a prepositional phrase or an infinitive. Too is an adverb meaning "excessively" or "also." Two is a number. Many other words in English which reflect the number two are spelled with tw: twin, twice, between, tweezers.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    31.
    • Knowledge
    • Grade-appropriate
    • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
    • Spelling rules
    • Encode
    • Accurately
    31a.
    • Encode
    • Vowel-consonant (VC) words
    • Consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words
    • Knowledge
    • Basic position-based rules
    • Closed syllables
    31b.
    • Encode
    • Consonant-vowel (CV) words
    • Knowledge
    • Open syllable patterns
    31c.
    • Encode
    • Two-consonant blends
    • Beginning position
    • Commonly confused blends
    • Distinguishing
    • Placement
    • Action
    • Lips, teeth, tongue placement and action
    • Articulation
    31d.
    • Encode
    • Consonant digraphs
    31e.
    • Encode
    • Vowel-consonant-e syllable pattern
    31f.
    • Encode
    • Common vowel teams
    • Common diphthongs
    • Prompting
    • Support
    31g.
    • Encode
    • vowel-r combinations
    • Prompting
    • Support
    31h.
    • Encode
    • Final /ch/ sound
    • Prompting
    • Support
    31i.
    • Encode
    • Final /f/, /l/, and /s/ sounds
    • One-syllable base words
    • Doubling
    • Final consonant
    • Short vowel sound
    • Prompting
    • Support
    31j.
    • Encode
    • Final /v/ sound
    31k.
    • Encode
    • Grade-appropriate high frequency words
    • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences
    31l.
    • Grade-appropriate high frequency words
    • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences and patterns
    • Position
    • Irregular pattern
    31m.
    • Encode
    • Suffixes
    31n.
    • Encode
    • Common prefixes
    • Prompting
    • Support
    31o.
    • Encode
    • Frequently confused homophones
    • Knowledge of English
    • Meaning
    • Facilitate
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    31. Students know:
    • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    • Spelling rules (or generalizations).
    31a.
    • Vowel-consonant (VC) and consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC) words.
    • Closed syllables follow a VC or CVC pattern.
    31b.
    • Consonant-vowel (CV) words.
    • Open syllable patterns.
    31c.
    • Words with two-consonant blends in beginning position.
    • Blends that are commonly confused, such as the tr blend and digraph ch and the dr blend and letter j.
    • The placement and action of the lips, teeth, and tongue during articulation.
    31d.
    • Consonant digraphs, such as sh, th, ch, wh, ng, ck.
    • One sound (phoneme) may be spelled with two letters (graphemes).
    31e.
    • The vowel-consonant-e syllable pattern.
    31f.
    • Common vowel teams and diphthongs, such as ee, ea, oa, ai, a, au, aw, oi, oy, ou, ow, oo, igh.
    31g.
    • The vowel-r combinations of ar, or, er, ir, and ur.
    31h.
    • Words with a /ch/ sound in the final position can be spelled with a -ch or -tch, depending on the previous letters.
    31i.
    • One-syllable words with a short vowel sound that end with a /f/, /l/, or /s/ sound should be spelled by doubling the final consonant.
    31j.
    • Words with final /v/ sound.
    • No English word ends with a v.
    31k.
    • Grade-appropriate high frequency words.
    • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    31l.
    • Grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences and patterns in all but one position.
    • The part of a word that does not follow the regular phoneme-grapheme correspondence.
    31m.
    • The suffixes -s, -es, -ing, -ed, -er, and -est. can be added to the end of base words.
    31n.
    • The common prefixes re-, un-, and mis- can be added to the beginning of base words.
    31o.
    • Frequently confused homophones, such as hear/here; for/four; to/too/two.
    Skills:
    31. Students are able to:
    • Encode (spell) words accurately by applying knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and spelling rules.
    31a.
    • Encode (spell) vowel-consonant and consonant-vowel-consonant words, using knowledge of basic position-based spelling rules, such as the C-K Spelling Rule.
    31b.
    • Encode consonant-vowel words, using knowledge of open syllable patterns.
    31c.
    • Distinguish the placement and action of the lips, teeth, and tongue during articulation of words with two-consonant blends in beginning position.
    • Encode words with two-consonant blends in beginning position.
    31d.
    • Encode (write/spell) words with consonant digraphs.
    31e.
    • Encode (write/spell) words with the vowel-consonant-e syllable patterns, such as hike, spike, joke, dime, make.
    31f.
    • With prompting and support, encode (write/spell) words with common vowel teams and diphthongs.
    31g.
    • With prompting and support, encode (write/spell) words with vowel-r combinations.
    31h. With prompting and support,
    • Choose -ch or -tch to correctly spell words with the final /ch/ sound.
    • Accurately encode (write/spell) words with final /ch/ sound spelled -ch and -tch.
    31i. With prompting and support,
    • Encode (write/spell) one-syllable words with final /f/, /l/, and /s/ sounds by doubling the final consonant when it follows a short vowel sound, such as in cliff, hill, pass.
    31j.
    • Encode (write/spell) words with final /v/ sound by adding an e at the end of the word, such as in have, give, save.
    31k.
    • Encode (write/spell) grade-appropriate high frequency words, such as am, at, can, he, we, be in, it, came, like.
    31l.
    • Encode (write/spell) grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences and patterns in all but one position, such as said, are, to.
    31m.
    • Encode (write/spell) words with suffixes, such as dogs, wishes, jumping, jumped, faster, fastest.
    31n.
    • With prompting and support, encode (write/spell) words with common prefixes re-, un-, and mis-.
    31o.
    • With prompting and support, encode (write/spell) homophones using knowledge of the English language and word meaning.
    Understanding:
    31. Students understand that:
    • They can use spelling generalizations/rules, syllable division principles, and their knowledge of letter-sound correspondences to spell and write words accurately.
    31a.
    • There are rules to help accurately encode vowel-consonant and consonant-vowel-consonant words.
    31b.
    • Open syllable patterns are syllables that end with a vowel that makes a long vowel sound.
    31c.
    • Knowing the placement and action of the lips, teeth, and tongue during articulation will help them accurately encode (spell/write) words with two-consonant blends in the beginning position.
    • Being aware of commonly confused blends will improve their encoding abilities.
    31d.
    • A consonant digraph is when one sound is spelled with more than one consonant.
    31e.
    • They should use syllable pattern rules to accurately spell vowel-consonant-e words.
    31f.
    • Vowel teams are a combination of two, three, or four letters that represent one vowel sound.
    • Diphthongs are a combination of vowels that glide in the middle due to a shifting mouth position.
    31g.
    • That vowel-r combinations are a single vowel letter followed by the letter r that represent a unique vowel sound.
    31h.
    • The final /ch/ sound can be spelled with -ch or -tch.
    • They should decide which spelling to use based on the previous letters in the word.
    31i.
    • They should double the final consonant after a short vowel sound in one-syllable words that end in -f, -l, and -s.
    31j.
    • There are no words in the English language that end with a letter v, so they must add an e to the end of the word to spell and write it accurately.
    31k.
    • High frequency words are words they will use often in their writing, so it is important to learn to encode them quickly and accurately.
    • Known phoneme-grapheme correspondences can be used to accurately encode words.
    31l.
    • Some high frequency words have irregular spelling patterns that they must learn to be able to spell and write the words accurately.
    31m.
    • Suffixes are added to the end of a base word and some have predictable spelling patterns.
    31n.
    • Prefixes are added to the beginning of a base word and some have predictable spelling patterns.
    31o.
    • Homophones are words that are pronounced the same but have different spellings and meanings.
    • It is important to spell homophones accurately to convey their intended message.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 19
    Learning Activities: 4
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Classroom Resources: 11
    32. Follow the rules of standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling appropriate to grade level.

    a. Identify the required features of a sentence, including capitalization of the first word and end punctuation.

    b. Transcribe spoken words to demonstrate that print represents oral language.

    c. Compose a simple sentence, including a subject and a predicate, that expresses a complete thought.

    d. With prompting and support, identify the role or purpose of a noun, verb, and adjective within a sentence and describe the type of the information it conveys.

    e. Write the correct number of words, with proper spacing, for a spoken phrase or sentence.

    f. Begin each sentence with a capital letter.

    g. Capitalize the pronoun I and names of individuals.

    h. Use commas in dates and words in a series.

    i. With prompting and support, recognize, name, and correctly use end punctuation, utilizing appropriate academic vocabulary.

    Example: period for declarative sentences, question mark for interrogative sentences, exclamation mark for exclamatory sentences
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    32.
    • Rules of standard English grammar
    • Punctuation rules
    • Capitalization rules
    • Spelling rules
    32a.
    • Identify
    • Required features of a sentence
    • Capitalization
    • End punctuation
    32b.
    • Transcribe
    • Spoken words
    • Demonstrate
    • Print
    • Oral language
    32c.
    • Simple sentence
    • Subject
    • Predicate
    • Complete thought
    32d.
    • Identify
    • Role
    • Purpose
    • Noun
    • Verb
    • Adjective
    • Sentence
    • Describe
    • Information
    32e.
    • Correct number of words
    • Proper spacing
    • Spoken phrase
    • Sentence
    32f.
    • Begin
    • Sentence
    • Capital letter
    32g.
    • Capitalize
    • Pronoun I
    • Names of individuals
    32h.
    • Commas
    • Dates
    • Words in a series
    32i.
    • Recognize
    • Name
    • End punctuation
    • Appropriate academic vocabulary
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    32. Students know:
    • The rules of standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling appropriate to the first grade level.
    32a.
    • The required features of a sentence.
    32b.
    • Words that are spoken orally can be written using printed letters.
    32c.
    • The features of a simple sentence.
    • The purpose of a subject and a predicate in a complete sentence.
    32d.
    • Role or purpose of a noun, verb, and adjective within a sentence.
    • The type of information nouns, verbs, and adjectives convey.
    32e.
    • Spoken phrases or sentences are composed of words that must be spaced properly when writing.
    32f.
    • Sentences begin with a capital letter.
    32g.
    • The pronoun I and names of individuals are capitalized.
    32h.
    • Commas should be used in dates and in a series of words.
    32i.
    • Types of end punctuation.
    • When to use end punctuation.
    • Academic vocabulary to describe the correct use of end punctuation.
    Skills:
    32. Students are able to:
    • Use proper grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling by following the rules of standard English.
    32a.
    • Identify the features of a sentence including, capitalization of the first word and end punctuation.
    32b.
    • Write spoken words.
    32c.
    • Combine a subject and predicate to compose a simple sentence that expresses a complete thought.
    32d.
    • Identify the role or purpose of a noun, verb, and adjective in a sentence.
    • Describe the type of information a noun, verb, and adjective provide in a sentence.
    32e.
    • Count the number of spoken words in a spoken phrase or sentence.
    • Write the correct number of words for a spoken phrase or sentence with proper spacing between each word.
    32f.
    • Use a capital letter to begin each sentence.
    32g.
    • Capitalize the pronoun I and names of individuals when writing.
    32h.
    • Identify a list of three or more items.
    • Identify dates.
    • Correctly use commas in dates and in a series (list) of three or more words.
    32i. With prompting and support,
    • Recognize, name, and correctly use end punctuation.
    • Utilize appropriate academic vocabulary when using end punctuation, such as period for declarative sentences, question mark for interrogative sentences, exclamation mark for exclamatory sentences.
    Understanding:
    32. Students understand that:
    • Using standard English grammar, punctuation, capitalization, and spelling in their writing will help them clearly communicate with a variety of audiences.
    32a.
    • A sentence begins with a capital letter and ends with punctuation while expressing a complete thought.
    32b.
    • Print represents oral language.
    32c.
    • To express a complete thought, a simple sentence must contain a subject and a predicate.
    32d.
    • Nouns, verbs, and adjectives are parts of speech.
    • Nouns identify people, places, things, or ideas in a sentence.
    • Verbs are action words that tell what a noun does in the sentence.
    • Adjectives are words that describe attributes of a noun in the sentence.
    32e.
    • A spoken phrase or sentence is composed of individual words, and they should show where one word ends and the next begins by including proper spacing in their writing.
    32f.
    • All sentences should begin with a capital letter.
    32g.
    • Names of individuals and the pronoun I should be capitalized in their writing.
    32h.
    • Commas are used to separate words in a series.
    • Commas are used to separate numbers in dates.
    32i.
    • There are three types of ending punctuation.
    • Question marks are used for questions.
    • Periods are used for statements.
    • Exclamation marks are used for exclamatory statements.
    • Sentences have different end punctuation based on the meaning of the sentence.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    33. Actively participate in shared writing experiences to compose and develop a well-organized paragraph with a topic sentence, details to support, and a concluding sentence.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    33.
    • Participate
    • Shared writing
    • Compose
    • Develop
    • Well-organized paragraph
    • Topic sentence
    • Supporting details
    • Concluding sentence
    Knowledge:
    33. Students know:
    • A well-organized paragraph includes a topic sentence, sentences with supporting details, and a concluding sentence.
    Skills:
    33. Students are able to:
    • Actively participate in shared writing experiences and compose and develop a paragraph with a topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence.
    Understanding:
    33. Students understand that:
    • A paragraph is composed of multiple sentences.
    • A well-organized paragraph includes a topic sentence, details that support the topic, and a concluding sentence.
    • Shared writing is a collaborative project.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    34. With prompting and support, write a narrative that recounts two or more appropriately sequenced events using transitions, incorporating relevant details, and providing a sense of closure.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    34.
    • Narrative
    • Appropriately sequenced events
    • Transitions
    • Relevant details
    • Sense of closure
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    34. Students know:
    • Narrative text describes a story in a series of events.
    • Events in a narrative are sequenced using transition words.
    • Narrative writing should include relevant details.
    • Narrative writing should end with a sense of closure.
    Skills:
    34. Students are able to:
    With prompting and support,
    • Write a narrative that recounts two or more appropriately sequenced events.
    • Use transition words in a narrative story.
    • Incorporate relevant details in a narrative story.
    • Provide a sense of closure when ending a narrative story.
    Understanding:
    34. Students understand that:
    • A narrative writing describes a sequence of events, uses transition words to show the chronological order of events, incorporates relevant details that are important to understand the story, and ends by providing the reader with a sense of closure.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    35. With prompting and support, write an informative or explanatory text about a topic, using facts from a source and providing a sense of closure.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    35.
    • Informative
    • Explanatory
    • Topic
    • Facts
    • Source
    • Sense of closure
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    35. Students know:
    • Informative or explanatory texts provide facts about a topic that were gathered from a research source.
    • Informative or explanatory writing should end with a sense of closure.
    Skills:
    35. Students are able to:
    With prompting and support,
    • Write an informative or explanatory text about a topic.
    • Use sources to find facts.
    • End the text by providing a sense of closure.
    Understanding:
    35. Students understand that:
    • Informative or explanatory texts require research, provide facts or details about a topic, and end with a sense of closure.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    36. With prompting and support, write an opinion piece about a topic, including at least one supporting reason from a source and providing a sense of closure.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    36.
    • Opinion
    • Topic
    • Supporting reason
    • Source
    • Sense of closure
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    36. Students know:
    • An opinion piece is focused on a topic and provides a reason for the opinion that was gathered from a source.
    • An opinion piece should end with a sense of closure.
    Skills:
    36. Students are able to:
    With prompting and support,
    • Write an opinion piece with at least one supporting reason.
    • Use sources to find a support reason for an opinion.
    • End the writing piece by providing a sense of closure.
    Understanding:
    36. Students understand that:
    • Opinion writing requires research, provides reasons for the stated opinion, and ends with a sense of closure.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    37. With prompting and support, write simple poems about a chosen subject.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    37.
    • Simple poems
    • Subject
    • Prompting
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    37. Students know:
    • The components of a simple poem.
    Skills:
    37. Students are able to:
    With prompting and support,
    • Choose a subject for a poem.
    • Write a simple poem.
    Understanding:
    37. Students understand that:
    • Poetry is a genre of writing that includes certain features and usually focuses on particular subjects.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    38. Develop and edit first drafts using appropriate spacing between letters, words, and sentences and left-to-right and top-to-bottom progression.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    38.
    • Develop
    • Edit
    • First drafts
    • Appropriate spacing
    • Left-to-right progression
    • Top-to-bottom progression
    Knowledge:
    38. Students know:
    • A first draft should be reviewed and edited for appropriate spacing and page progression.
    Skills:
    38. Students are able to:
    • Develop and edit first drafts.
    • Use appropriate spacing between letters, words, and sentences in a draft writing.
    • Write from left-to-right and top-to-bottom in a draft.
    Understanding:
    38. Students understand that:
    • There is a writing process involved in creating a writing project, and first drafts should be reviewed and edited to ensure they follow the basic concepts of printed text.
    • There are rules of writing that should be followed to create a text that can be shared with others.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    39. Improve writing, as needed, by planning, revising, and editing with guidance from peer editors, responding to their questions and suggestions.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    39.
    • Improve
    • Writing
    • Planning
    • Revising
    • Editing
    • Peer editors
    • Questions
    • Suggestions
    Knowledge:
    39. Students know:
    • The writing process includes planning, revising, and editing, incorporating guidance and suggestions from others.
    • The process for peer editing and review.
    Skills:
    39. Students are able to:
    • Plan, revise, edit, and use suggestions from peers to improve writing.
    Understanding:
    39. Students understand that:
    • To improve writing they need to follow all of the steps of the writing process.
    • Responding to peers' questions and suggestions during the peer editing process will help improve their writing.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    40. Describe ideas, thoughts, and feelings, using adjectives, drawings, or other visual displays to clarify.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    40.
    • Describe
    • Ideas
    • Thoughts
    • Feelings
    • Adjectives
    • Drawings
    • Visual displays
    • Clarify
    Knowledge:
    40. Students know:
    • How to describe ideas, thoughts, and feelings using adjectives or drawings.
    • Adjectives are words that describe attributes of nouns.
    Skills:
    40. Students are able to:
    • Use adjectives to describe ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
    • Add illustrations or other visual displays to clarify ideas, thoughts, and feelings.
    Understanding:
    40. Students understand that:
    • Adjectives may be used to describe thoughts, ideas, or feelings.
    • Adding drawings or other visuals to descriptions help to express thoughts, clarify ideas, and share feelings.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    41. Organize a list of words into alphabetical order according to the first and (when necessary) second letters of the words.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    41.
    • Organize
    • List
    • Alphabetical order
    • First letter
    • Second letter
    Knowledge:
    41. Students know:
    • Alphabetical order to the first and second letter (when necessary).
    Skills:
    41. Students are able to:
    • Organize a list of words in alphabetical order according to the first letter, looking to the second letter if necessary.
    Understanding:
    41. Students understand that:
    • The alphabet has an exact order which can be used to organize a list of words.
    • They must use the second letter of the word when the first letters are the same.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 3
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 2
    42. Participate in shared research and writing projects to answer a question or describe a topic.

    a. Recall information from experiences to contribute to shared research and writing projects.

    b. Gather information from provided sources.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    42.
    • Participate
    • Shared research projects
    • Shared writing projects
    • Question
    • Describe
    • Topic
    42a.
    • Recall information
    • Experiences
    • Contribute
    • Shared research projects
    • Shared writing projects
    42b.
    • Information
    • Sources
    Knowledge:
    42. Students know:
    • Research and writing projects can answer a question or describe a topic.
    42a.
    • Information recalled from personal experiences can be used in research and writing projects.
    42b.
    • Information can be gathered from a variety of sources.
    Skills:
    42. Students are able to:
    • Participate in shared research and writing projects.
    • Answer questions about a topic in writing.
    • Describe a topic in writing.
    42a.
    • Recall information from previous experiences.
    • Contribute this information to shared research and writing projects.
    42b.
    • Use strategies to gather information from provided sources to write about a topic.
    Understanding:
    42. Students understand that:
    • Shared research and writing projects can help answer questions or describe a topic.
    42a.
    • Information gathered from personal experiences can be contributed to research and writing projects.
    42b.
    • Information gathered from other sources can be contributed to research and writing projects.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    43. Use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing with guidance and support from adults, working both individually and in collaboration with peers.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    43.
    • Digital tools
    • Produce writing
    • Publish writing
    • Individually
    • Collaboration with peers
    • Guidance
    • Support
    Knowledge:
    43. Students know:
    • Digital tools can be used to produce and publish writing.
    • Writing can be created and published individually or collaboratively.
    Skills:
    43. Students are able to:
    • Use a variety of digital tools to produce and publish writing.
    • Produce and publish writing individually.
    • Collaborate with peers to produce and publish writing.
    Understanding:
    43. Students understand that:
    • Digital tools are available to produce and publish writing.
    • They can produce and publish writing alone or in collaboration with others.