Courses of Study : Mathematics (Grade 1)

Operations and Algebraic Thinking
Represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction.
Note: Students use properties of operations and different strategies to find the sum of three whole numbers, such as counting on, making tens, decomposing numbers, doubles, and near doubles.
Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 5
Classroom Resources: 2
1. Use addition and subtraction to solve word problems within 20 by using concrete objects, drawings, and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.

a. Add to with change unknown to solve word problems within 20.

b. Take from with change unknown to solve word problems within 20.

c. Put together/take apart with addend unknown to solve word problems within 20.

d. Compare quantities, with difference unknown, bigger unknown, and smaller unknown while solving word problems within 20.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use a variety of representations to solve word problems.
  • Justify and explain answers using concrete objects and drawings.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Change unknown
  • Put together
  • Take apart
  • Compare
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • addition and subtraction strategies and models.
  • how to form an equation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • represent quantities and operations (addition & subtraction) with concrete objects, pictorially, or symbolically.
  • Use informal and mathematical language to communicate the representations.
  • Accurately compute sums and differences.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • addition is both putting together and adding to. subtraction is taking apart, taking from, and comparisons.
  • Mathematical problems can be solved using a variety of strategies. models, and representations.
  • variables in the form of blanks, boxes, or letters, represent unknown quantities when representing mathematical situations algebraically.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.1.1: Solve addition and subtraction word problems, and add and subtract within 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
M.1.1.2: Understand key words in addition and subtraction word problems.
Examples: sum, difference, all together, how many more, how many are left, in all.
M.1.1.3: Define subtraction as separating groups of objects, taking from, or taking apart.
M.1.1.4: Define addition as combining groups of objects, adding to, or putting together.
M.1.1.5: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
M.1.1.6: Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
M.1.1.7: Use objects to combine and separate groups.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Define how many, all together, and in all.
  • Count to 20 by ones.
  • Demonstrate 1:1 correspondence.
  • Mimic counting objects in sequential order arranged in a line, circle, or array.
  • Count no more than 5 objects in a scattered configuration.
  • Mimic counting no more than 5 objects in a scattered configuration.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Count in sequential order.
  • Mimic counting in sequential order.
  • Demonstrate one to one correspondence.
  • Make purposeful marks such as lines and circles.
  • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
  • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
  • Be interested in who has more or less.
  • Understand the concept of "less than".
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Recognize numbers from one to ten.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M. AAS.1.1 Represent addition as "add to/put together" and subtraction as "take from/take apart" with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, or verbal explanations (limited to 10).


Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 4
2. Solve word problems that call for addition of three whole numbers whose sum is less than or equal to 20 by using concrete objects, drawings, or equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem.
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compute the sum of three whole numbers using a variety of representations such as concrete objects, drawings, or equations.
  • Explain and justify the answer using the representations.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Concrete objects
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to solve for addition by using strategies and understanding the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • efficiently apply strategies for solving multiple addend problems.
  • Use symbols to represent unknown quantities in equations.
  • Accurately compute sums.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • more than two quantities can be combined in a problem.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.2.1: Solve addition word problems with sums less than or equal to 10, e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem.
M.1.2.2: Understand key words in addition word problems.
Examples: sum, all together, how many more, in all
M.1.2.3: Define addition as combining groups of objects, adding to, or putting together.
M.1.2.4: Represent addition with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
M.1.2.5: Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
M.1.2.6: Use objects to combine groups.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Understand key words in addition and subtraction word problems.
    Examples: all together, how many more, how many are left, in all.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Represent addition and subtraction with objects, pictures, fingers, or sounds within twenty.
  • Understand addition as putting together and subtraction as taking from.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Rote count to 20.
  • Notice same/different and some/all.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Point to matching or similar objects.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M. AAS.1.1 Represent addition as "add to/put together" and subtraction as "take from/take apart" with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds (e.g., claps), acting out situations, or verbal explanations (limited to 10).


Understand and apply properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction.
Note: Students need not use formal terms for these properties.
Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 1
3. Apply properties of operations as strategies to add and subtract.

Examples: If 8 + 3 = 11 is known, then 3 + 8 = 11 is also known (commutative property of addition).
To add 2 + 6 + 4, the second and third numbers can be added to make a ten, so 2 + 6 + 4 = 2 + 10 = 12 (associative property of addition).
When adding 0 to a number, the result is the same number (identity property of zero for addition).
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use informal language of properties to justify their sums and differences ("I already figured out that 8 + 3 = 11, and 3 + 8 is just the turn around of that so it must be 11, too.").
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Commutative property of addition
  • Associative property of addition
  • Identity property of zero for addition
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • addition and subtraction strategies.
  • how to form an equation.
  • li>how the commutative property works.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Strategically apply properties of addition in order to find sums.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the order in which addends are joined doesn't change the sum.
  • numbers may be composed or decomposed in a variety of ways.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.3.1: Define addition and subtraction.
M.1.3.2: Recognize properties of operations.
M.1.3.3: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
M.1.3.4: Apply signs +, -, = to actions of joining and separating sets. M 1.3.5: Identify fact families to ten.
M.1.3.6: Recognize the value of zero.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Decompose numbers up to 5 using objects or drawings.
  • Compose numbers up to 5 using objects or drawings.
  • Count backward from 5.
  • Count forward to 5.
  • Write numerals from 0 to 10.
  • Represent a given numeral 1 to 10 with objects or drawings.
  • Count forward from a given number 1 to 10.
  • Model joining sets of objects to total 10.
  • Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
  • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
  • Identify numerals 1 to 10.
  • Count 0 to 10.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Understand key words in addition and subtraction word problems.
    Examples: all together, how many more, how many are left, in all.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Using counting, find one less than a number 2 through 20.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.3 Demonstrate "putting together" two sets of objects to solve the problem.


Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 2
4. Explain subtraction as an unknown-addend problem.

Example: subtracting 10 - 8 by finding the number that makes 10 when added to 8
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use a pictorial or physical model to explain the connection between subtraction and addition.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Addend
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The relationship between addition and subtraction.
  • how to explain subtraction as an unknown addend.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use symbols such as blanks, boxes, or letters to represent unknown quantities in equations.
  • Communicate the connections between subtraction and addition.
  • Use the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction to find differences.
  • Choose and apply addition and subtraction strategies to accurately determine sums and differences within 20.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • addition and subtraction have an inverse relationship that can be used to solve problems.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.4.1: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
M.1.4.2: Identify fact families to ten.
M.1.4.3: Recall basic addition facts to ten.
M.1.4.4: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Decompose numbers up to 5 using objects or drawings.
  • Compose numbers up to 5 using objects or drawings.
  • Count backward from 5.
  • Count forward to 5.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Pair "taking away" with subtraction.
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Pair putting together with adding.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Separate from a larger group to make 2 smaller groups.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Understand one less than a number 2 through 20.
  • Understand one more than a number 1 through 20.
  • Rote count to 20.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.3 Demonstrate "putting together" two sets of objects to solve the problem.


Add and subtract within 20.
Note: Fluency involves a mixture of "just knowing" answers, knowing answers from patterns, and knowing answers from the use of strategies. The word fluently is used in the standards to mean accurately, efficiently, and flexibly.
Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
5. Relate counting to addition and subtraction.

Example: counting on 2 to add 2
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use modeling strategies (number paths, counting objects) to justify solutions (both counting on and counting back) and to show the relationship between counting, addition, and subtraction.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Number paths
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to count on or count back from a given number within 20.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Explain counting strategies for addition and subtraction.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • counting patterns can be used to find solutions in addition and subtraction situations.
  • A variety of models and tools can be used to communicate justifications for mathematical ideas and solutions.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.5.1: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.
M.1.5.2: Count forward and backward from a given number.
M.1.5.3: Count to 20 by ones.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Mimic counting backwards from 5 to 0 by ones.
  • Count to 50 by ones.
  • Count to 50 by tens.
  • Count to 20 by ones.
  • Count to 10 by ones.
  • Mimic counting by tens.
  • Mimic counting by ones.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Pair "taking away" with subtraction.
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Pair putting together with adding.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Separate from a larger group to make 2 smaller groups.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Understand one less than a number 2 through 20.
  • Understand one more than a number 1 through 20.
  • Rote count to 20.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.5 Use manipulatives or visual representations to indicate the number that results when adding one more. Apply knowledge of "one less" to subtract one from a number.


Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
6. Add and subtract within 20.

a. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by counting on.

b. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by making ten.

c. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by decomposing a number leading to a ten.

Example: 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9

d. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by using the relationship between addition and subtraction.

Example: Knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4.

e. Demonstrate fluency with addition and subtraction facts with sums or differences to 10 by creating equivalent but easier or known sums.

Example: adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Use an efficient strategy (e.g., recall, doubles, counting on 1 or 2, close to doubles) to add numbers within 20.
  • Fluently add and subtract within 10.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Fluency
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Strategies for finding sums and differences within 20.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Use addition and subtraction strategies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Addition and subtraction strategies can be used to compute sums and differences, and how.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.6.1: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10.
M.1.6.2: Add and subtract within 5.
M.1.6.3: Count forward and backward from a given number.
M.1.6.4: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
  • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
  • Identify numerals 0 to 10.
  • Count 0 to 10.
  • Understand key words in addition and subtraction word problems.
    Examples: all together, how many more, how many are left, in all.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Define addition as combining groups of objects.
  • Define subtraction as separating groups of objects.
  • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
  • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
  • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 10 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Pair "taking away" with subtraction.
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Pair putting together with adding.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Separate from a larger group to make 2 smaller groups.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.6 Add and subtract numbers 1 to 15 using objects, pictures, and fingers.


Work with addition and subtraction equations.
Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
7. Explain that the equal sign means "the same as." Determine whether equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false.

Example: determining which of the following equations are true and which are false: 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Justify the truth of the statement on each side of the equal sign.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Equation
  • Meaning of the equal sign
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • strategies for finding the value of simple addition and subtraction equations.
  • Strategies for comparing quantities between 0 and 20.
  • Strategies to show equality or inequality.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • efficiently apply strategies for determining the value of simple addition and subtraction equations.
  • Justify and explain their thinking.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • the equal sign represents a relationship of balance between numerical expressions rather than performing an operation.
Diverse Learning Needs:
Essential Skills:
Learning Objectives:
M.1.7.1: Define true, false, and equal.
M.1.7.2: Demonstrate equal using manipulatives or object drawings.
M.1.7.3: Recall basic addition facts to ten.
M.1.7.4: Recognize equation symbols in vertical and horizontal addition and subtraction problems.
M.1.7.5: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

Prior Knowledge Skills:
  • Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
  • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
  • Identify numerals 1 to 10.
  • Count 0 to 10.
  • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
  • Understand true, false, same (equal).
  • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
  • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
  • Count items in a set up to twenty.
  • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
  • Using counting, find one less than a number 2 through 20.
  • Using counting, find one more than a number 1 through 20.
  • Rote count to 20.
  • Understand adding numbers up and down is the same as side by side.

Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
AAS Standard:
M.AAS.1.7 Given three related whole numbers, construct a number sentence that is true, in relation to addition and subtraction.


Mathematics (2019)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 2
8. Solve for the unknown whole number in various positions in an addition or subtraction equation, relating three whole numbers that would make it true.

Example: determining the unknown number that makes the equation true in each of the equations 8 + ? = 11, 5 = ? - 3, and 6 + 6 = ?
Unpacked Content
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Solve single operation addition/subtraction equations containing a single unknown.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Equation
  • Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • Strategies for solving simple addition or subtraction equations with one unknown.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • solve simple addition and subtraction equations.
    • Justify and explain their thinking.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • equalities contain expressions that name the same amount on each side of the equal sign, even with quantities unknown.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.8.1: Decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, e.g., by using objects or drawings, and record each decomposition by a drawing or equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).
    M.1.8.2: Identify fact families as a relationship between addition and subtraction.
    M.1.8.3: Recall basic addition and subtraction facts to ten.
    M.1.8.4: Identify plus, minus, and equal signs.
    M.1.8.5: Represent addition and subtraction with objects, fingers, mental images, drawings, sounds, acting out situations, verbal explanations, expressions, or equations.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Write numerals from 0 to 10.
    • Represent a given numeral 1 to 10 with objects or drawings.
    • Count forward from a given number 1 to 10.
    • Model joining sets of objects to total 10.
    • Match numerals to objects or drawings.
    • Identify numerals 1 to 10.
    • Count from 0 to 10.
    • Add and subtract numbers within 20 using objects, pictures and fingers.
    • Understand true, false, same (equal).
    • Take a smaller set out of a larger set.
    • Combine two sets to make a larger set up to twenty.
    • Count items in a set up to twenty.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects.
    • Understand one less than a number 2 through 20.
    • Understand one more than a number 1 through 20.
    • Understand positional terms with equal signs.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.7 Given three related whole numbers, construct a number sentence that is true, in relation to addition and subtraction.


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    9. Reproduce, extend, and create patterns and sequences of numbers using a variety of materials.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Reproduce a pattern.
    • Extend a pattern.
    • Create patterns.
    • Create sequences of numbers.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Number patterns
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to duplicate simple patterns.
    • how to extend simple patterns.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • reproduce given patterns.
    • Extend given patterns.
    • Create patterns.
    • Create sequences of numbers.
    Understanding:
    Students should understand that:
    • looking for, describing, and extending patterns can be used to help them develop skills in all mathematical situations.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.9.1: Duplicate and extend simple patterns by using concrete objects.
    M.1.9.2: Identify simple patterns.
    M.1.9.3: Mimic simple patterns.
    M.1.9.4: Match a simple object.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
    • Understand first and next.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.9 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, duplicate, extend, and create simple patterns using concrete objects.


    Operations with Numbers: Base Ten
    Extend the counting sequence.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 3
    Classroom Resources: 1
    10. Extend the number sequence from 0 to 120.

    a. Count forward and backward by ones, starting at any number less than 120.

    b. Read numerals from 0 to 120.

    c. Write numerals from 0 to 120.

    d. Represent a number of objects from 0 to 120 with a written numeral.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Use the pattern and regularity in the counting sequence to recognize the position of any number between 0 and 120 and then continue counting in sequence from the given number.
    • Count backwards by ones from any given number 0 to 120.
    • Write the corresponding numeral when given a number orally or given a quantity of objects from 0 to 120.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Number
    • Numeral
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • number/numeral correspondence (from 0-120).
    • Strategies for counting sets of objects.
    • how to read numbrs from 0 - 120.
    • how to write numbers from 0 - 120.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • strategically apply counting strategies.
    • Write numerals 0-20.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • there are patterns in our base ten number system.
    • quantities can be represented both physically and symbolically (numerals).
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.10.1: Write numerals from 0 to 20.
    M.1.10.2: Recognize numerals to 100.
    M.1.10.3: Match the numeral to the number objects or picture of objects.
    M.1.10.4: Count to 100 by ones.
    M.1.10.5: Count to 20 by ones.
    M.1.10.6: Identify and name numerals 0-9.
    M.1.10.7: Trace numerals 0-9.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Count forward to 100 from a number over 50.
    • Count forward to 100 from a number between 2 and 50.
    • Count forward to 50 from a given number.
    • Count to 100 by ones.
    • Mimic counting to 100 by ones.
    • Count to 50 by ones.
    • Mimic counting to 50 by ones.
    • Mimic counting backwards from 5 to 0 by ones.
    • Count to 50 by tens.
    • Count to 20 by ones.
    • Count to 10 by ones.
    • Mimic counting by tens.
    • Mimic counting by ones.
    • Count to 50 and above.
    • Mimic counting forward and backward by ones.
    • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
    • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
    • Continue to have an interest in counting.
    • Understand the concept of size and amount.
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many".
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).
    • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object (up to ten objects).
    • Recognize that numbers have meaning.
    • Rote count to 50.
    • Communicate number words.
    • Recognize before and after.
    • Trace numerals 1- 20.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.10 Count forward to 30 by ones, starting with any number less than 30. Recognize numerals 0 through 15 as written. When given a numeral 0 to 15, represent the numeral with objects.


    Understand place value.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 3
    Classroom Resources: 1
    11. Explain that the two digits of a two-digit number represent amounts of tens and ones.
    a. Identify a bundle of ten ones as a "ten."

    b. Identify the numbers from 11 to 19 as composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones.

    c. Identify the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 as one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Use a variety of representations (symbolic: 10+8. pictorial: one line and 8 dots. physical: place value blocks, bundles of sticks, or groups of fingers, etc.) to show and explain the decomposition of the number into groups of 10 and ones.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Base ten
    • Decompose
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to decompose numbers 11-19.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • Use place value models or mental strategies to decompose numbers.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • a two-digit number represents amounts of tens and ones.
    • Ten things can be represented as one ten or as ten ones.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.11.1: Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    M.1.11.2: Represent numbers with multiple models.
    Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
    M.1.11.3: Count to 100 by tens.
    M.1.11.4: Count 10 objects.
    M.1.11.5: Count to 10 by ones.
    M.1.11.6: Name numerals 0 to 19.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
    • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).
    • Given small groups of objects, create larger groups by combining the small groups.
    • Understand ten and 1 (ten 1's =10).
    • Put together two small groups of objects to create a larger group.
    • Understand number words.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
    • Rote count to 10.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.11 Recognize and create sets of ten (limit to three sets).


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 3
    Classroom Resources: 1
    12. Compare pairs of two-digit numbers based on the values of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and < and orally with the words "is greater than," "is equal to," and "is less than."
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Use place value terminology and concepts to explain and justify the use of <, =, > to compare the numbers and create true equalities and inequalities.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Equalities
    • Inequalities
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to compare quantities using the terminology "greater than", "equal to", and "less than".
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • compare 2-digit numbers.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • numbers can be decomposed to determine if the amount is greater than, equal to, or less than, how that can be done.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.12.1: Define greater than, less than and equal to.
    M.1.12.2: Demonstrate greater than, less than, and equal to using manipulatives, object drawings or numbers 0 to 10.
    M.1.12.3: Use comparison vocabulary.
    Examples: greater than, equal to, and less than.
    M.1.12.4: Recognize symbols for greater than, less than and equal to.
    M.1.12.5: Determine the value of the digits in the ones and tens place.
    M.1.12.6: Identify sets with more, less or equal objects.
    M.1.12.7: Imitate creating sets of a given size.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Define greater than, less than, and equal to.
    • Count to 20 by ones.
    • Count objects up to ten.
    • Understand amount words, such as more, less, and another.
    • Begin to understand that parts of an object can make a whole.
    • Become more interested in the concept of some and all.
    • Be interested in who has more or less.
    • Understand the concept of "less than"
    • Mimic counting by ones.
    • Recognize numbers from one to ten.
    • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
    • Understand the concept of size and amount.
    • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.12 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, compare two groups of 10 or fewer items using appropriate vocabulary (e.g., more, less, equal) when the number of items in each group is similar.


    Use place value understanding and properties of operations to add and subtract.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 1
    13. Add within 100, using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value.

    a. Add a two-digit number and a one-digit number.

    b. Add a two-digit number and a multiple of 10.

    c. Demonstrate that in adding two-digit numbers, tens are added to tens, ones are added to ones, and sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.

    d. Relate the strategy for adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Add within 100.
    • Explain their reasoning using concrete models or drawings, or using strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction.
    • Relate the strategy used to a written method (symbolic and numeric recording of the steps used).
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Compose
    • Multiple of 10
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to add within 100 using place vaue strategies.
    • how to identify tens and ones.
    • how to compose two digit numbers.
    • how to decompose two digit numbers.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • add within 100.
    • Model addition problems using visual models.
    • Record strategies for solving addition problems.
    • Communicate the relationship between models and symbolic (numeric) representations.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • relationships between models of addition problems and written strategies of those models can be used to justify solutions.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.13.1: Demonstrate regrouping, total sum, and solve using drawings and concrete models.
    M.1.13.2: Model written method for recording horizontal addition problems.
    M.1.13.3: Determine the value of the number in the ones and tens place.
    M.1.13.4: Match the number in the ones, tens, and hundreds position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    M.1.13.5: Represent numbers with multiple models.
    Examples: models—base ten blocks, number lines, linking cubes, straw bundles.
    M.1.13.6: Recall single-digit addition facts.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 0-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Recognize numbers from 0-10.
    • Become interested in how many objects she/he has.
    • Understand the concept of size and amount.
    • Given a set number of objects one through ten, answer the question "how many?"
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Understand that 10 1's = 10.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture, a drawing or objects.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
    • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.
    • Recognize that numbers and numerals have meaning.
    • Rote count to 10.
    • Communicate number words.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.13 Compose and decompose numbers from 1 to 15 into one ten and ones using objects, drawings, or pictures.


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 3
    Learning Activities: 2
    Classroom Resources: 1
    14. Given a two-digit number, mentally find 10 more or 10 less than the number without having to count, and explain the reasoning used.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • Can efficiently find 10 more or 10 less than the given number.
    • Explain their mental strategies.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Ten more
    • Ten less
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to mentally find 10 more or 10 less of a two digit number and explain reasoning.
    • place value vocabulary: tens, ones.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • mentally add or subtract 10 from a number in the range from 1-100.
    • Explain their reasoning using place value understanding and patterns.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • patterns in the place value system can be used to mentally compute sums and differences.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.14.1: Define more and less.
    M.1.14.2: Demonstrate conceptual understanding of adding or subtracting 10 using concrete models.
    M.1.14.3: Count backward from 100 by tens.
    M.1.14.4: Count forward to 100 by tens.
    M.1.14.5: Count to 100 by ones.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define ones and tens.
    • Match the number in the ones and tens position to a pictorial representation or manipulative of the value.
    • Add numbers 1-9 to ten to create teen numbers using manipulatives or place value blocks.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Count to 50 and above.
    • Mimic counting by ones.
    • Recognize numbers from 1-50.
    • Understand the concept of amount.
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).
    • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object (up to ten objects).
    • Recognize that numbers have meaning.
    • Recognize numbers 1-10.
    • Rote count to 50.
    • Communicate number words.
    • Add one to a set of objects (up to 10 objects).

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.13 Compose and decompose numbers from 1 to 15 into one ten and ones using objects, drawings, or pictures.


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    15. Subtract multiples of 10 from multiples of 10 in the range 10-90 (positive or zero differences), using concrete models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction. Relate the strategy to a written method and explain the reasoning used.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • subtract multiples of 10 from more tens using concrete models, drawings, and written equations.
    • look for and describe patterns they find.
    • explain their reasoning using place value and patterns.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Multiple of 10
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • place value models for adding and subtracting numbers less than 100.
    • strategies for adding and subtracting multiples of 10.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • use models and strategies to find and record solutions to problems where a multiple of 10 is subtracted.
    • explain their strategies.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • patterns in the place value system can be used to mentally compute sums and differences.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.15.1: Demonstrate conceptual understanding of subtraction using concrete models.
    M.1.15.2: Model written method for recording problems involving subtraction of 10 from multiples of 10.
    M.1.15.3: Count backward from 100 by tens.
    M.1.15.4: Count forward to 100 by tens. M 1.15.5: Mimic counting to 100 by tens.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Define subtraction as separating groups of objects.
    • Represent numbers with objects or drawings.
    • Separate sets with nine or fewer objects.
    • Combine objects to form sets up to nine.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Subtract one from a set of objects (up to five objects).
    • Given a group of objects (ten or less), divide the group into smaller groups in various ways.
    • Take away objects from a large group to create two smaller groups.
    • Establish one-to-one correspondence between numbers and objects when given a picture a drawing or objects.
    • Understand number words.
    • Understand that 10 1's = 10.
    • Count forward to 50 by tens.
    • Count backwards from 50 by tens.
    • Mimic counting to 50 by tens.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.13 Compose and decompose numbers from 1 to 15 into one ten and ones using objects, drawings, or pictures.


    Data Analysis
    Collect and analyze data and interpret results.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 5
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 4
    16. Organize, represent, and interpret data with up to three categories.

    a. Ask and answer questions about the total number of data points in organized data.

    b. Summarize data on Venn diagrams, pictographs, and "yes-no" charts using real objects, symbolic representations, or pictorial representations.

    c. Determine "how many" in each category using up to three categories of data.

    d. Determine "how many more" or "how many less" are in one category than in another using data organized into two or three categories.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • will create a table or chart to organize and represent data with up to three categories using physical objects, tally mark graphs, pictographs, Venn diagrams, yes/no charts, or bar graphs.
    • analyze and interpret the data verbally and in writing by asking and answering questions about the total number of data points, how many in each category, or how many more or less are in one category than in another.
    • use measurement vocabulary such as most, least, more than, less than, and similar comparison words.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Tally mark graphs
    • Pictographs
    • Venn diagrams
    • Yes/no charts
    • Bar graphs
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • objects can be grouped into categories based on like characteristics.
    • they can gain information from graphs.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • create, analyze, and interpret data.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • questions concerning mathematical contexts can be answered by collecting and organizing data.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.16.1: Define more and less.
    M.1.16.2: Describe methods for representing data.
    Examples: pictographs, tally charts, bar graphs, and Venn Diagrams.
    M.1.16.3: Locate information on data displays.
    M.1.16.4: Classify objects into given categories; count the number of objects in each category, and sort the categories by count.
    M.1.16.5: Recognize different types of data displays.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects.
    • Identify object attributes.
      Examples: color, shape, size, texture, use.
    • Count objects up to ten.
    • Count to 10 by ones.
    • Understand a different types of graphs (ex. Venn diagram, bar graphs and pictograph).
    • Identify more and less when given two groups of objects of 10 or fewer.
    • Count objects up to 10.
    • Count to 10 by ones.
    • Understand categories.
    • Identify object attributes.
      Examples: color, shape, size, texture, purpose.
    • Count to 1-20.
    • Mimic counting by ones.
    • Recognize numerals from 0-20.
    • Understand the concept of amount.
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group (up to ten objects).

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.16 Sort objects or pictures into common categories (e.g., shapes, pets, fruits; limited to two categories and a combined total of 15 objects/pictures for the categories).


    Measurement
    Describe and compare measurable attributes.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    17. Order three objects by length; compare the lengths of two objects indirectly by using a third object.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • use measurement vocabulary to first estimate, describe, and then compare the measurable attributes.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Measurable attributes
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to correctly align the objects.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • use direct and indirect comparison to order objects by length.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • measurable attributes of objects can be used to describe and compare the objects.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.17.1: Define length.
    M.1.17.2: Use vocabulary related to length.
    Examples: longer, shorter, longest, shortest, taller.
    M.1.17.3: Identify objects by length.
    Examples: shortest pencil, tallest boy.
    M.1.17.4: Sort objects according to length.
    Example: sort short pencils from long pencils.
    M.1.17.5: Explore objects in relationship to length.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Use vocabulary related to length and weight.
      Example: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter.
    • Identify objects by length and weight.
      Example: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
    • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
    • Define length and weight.
    • Explore objects in relationship to length and weight.
    • Define more, less, length.
    • Use vocabulary related to length.
      Examples: longer, shorter.
    • Identify objects by length.
      Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
    • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
    • Use comparative language (longer/shorter, taller/shorter) for the attributes of objects related to length.
    • Communicate long, tall, short.
    • Recognize the length attributes of objects (long/short, tall/short).
    • Recognize length as the measurement of something from end to end.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.17 Compare and determine lengths of objects using non-standard units of measurements (real or pictures) in terms of longer/shorter and taller/shorter.


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    18. Determine the length of an object using non-standard units with no gaps or overlaps, expressing the length of the object with a whole number.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • accurately measure length using non-standard units (e.g., paper clips, Cuisenaire rods).
    • understand that units must be laid end to end with no gaps or overlaps when measuring.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Non-standard units
    • Iteration
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • measurable attributes of objects, specifically length.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • accurately measure length using non-standard units (to the nearest whole unit).
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • the smaller the unit, the more units will be needed to measure the object.
    • the larger the unit, the fewer units needed to measure an object.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.18.1: Describe gap and overlap.
    M.1.18.2: Describe what it means to measure using non-standard units.
    M.1.18.3: Model measuring using non-standard units.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Use vocabulary related to length and weight.
      Example: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter.
    • Identify objects by length and weight.
      Example: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
    • Sort objects according to measurable attributes.
    • Define length and weight.
    • Explore objects in relationship to length and weight.
    • Define more, less, length, width, weight and height.
    • Use vocabulary related to length, width, weight and height.
      Examples: longer, shorter, heavier, lighter, small, big.
    • Identify objects by length, weight and height.
      Examples: shortest pencil, heaviest rock.
    • Sort objects according to non-measurable attributes.
    • Understanding concepts of small, big, heavy, light, tall, short.
    • Understand concept of too much or too little.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.17 Compare and determine lengths of objects using non-standard units of measurements (real or pictures) in terms of longer/shorter and taller/shorter.


    Work with time and money.
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 2
    19. Tell and write time to the hours and half hours using analog and digital clocks.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • tell and write time in hours and half-hours using analog and digital clocks.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Analog
    • Digital
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to tell time to the hour and half hour using analog and digital clocks.
    • how to tell time to the hour and half hour using analog and digitial clocks.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • accurately read and write time to the hour and half hour from analog and digital clocks.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • analog and digital clocks represent the time at any particular moment and show the passage of time with the movement of the hands or the changing of the digits.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.19.1: Describe the short hand as the hour hand and the long hand as the minute hand on an analog clock.
    M.1.19.2: Describe the first number as the hour, and the numbers after the colon as the minutes on a digital clock.
    M.1.19.3: Count to 30 by fives.
    M.1.19.4: Recognize numbers 1 to 12, and 30.
    M.1.19.5: Trace numerals 1 to 12, and 30.
    M.1.19.6: Associate digital and analog clocks with the measurement of time.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Identify numbers 1 to 12.
    • Count by 5s.
    • Identify activities on a daily schedule that come before, next, after other activities.
    • Know before, next and after.
    • Use a daily schedule containing times (in hours) and activities (in pictures).
    • Tell time in hours on an analog clock.
    • Demonstrate an understanding of yesterday, today, tomorrow, morning, afternoon, day, and night.
    • Recognize yesterday, today, tomorrow.
    • Recognize morning, afternoon, evening/night.
    • Recognize day and night.
    • Understand the concept of time.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.19 Demonstrate an understanding of the concept of time using words such as yesterday, today, tomorrow, morning, afternoon, day, and night; identify activities that come before, next, and after on a daily schedule using a clock limited to time in hours.


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 0
    20. Identify pennies and dimes by name and value.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • identify pennies by name and value.
    • identify dimes by name and value.
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to count by ones and identify a penny.
    • how to count by tens and identify a dime.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • identify a penny by name and its value as 1 cent.
    • identify a dime by name and its value as 10 cents.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • pennies represents counting by ones.
    • a dime represents counting by tens.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.20.1: Identify that a penny has a value of one cent and demonstrate that 10 pennies has the same value as 1 dime.
    M.1.20.2: Recognize the value of 1 and 10.
    M.1.20.3: Sort pennies and dimes.
    M.1.20.4: Count 10 objects.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Count to 1-10.
    • Understand the concept of amount.
    • Pair the number of objects counted with "how many?"
    • Understand that the last number name tells the number of objects counted.
    • Pair a group of objects with a number representing the total number of objects in the group.
    • Count objects one-by-one using only one number per object.
    • Recognize that numbers have meaning.
    • Recognize numerals 1-10.
    • Communicate number words.
    • Point to matching or similar objects.
    • Identify a penny, dime by attributes (color, size).
    • Recognize a penny as 1 cent.
    • Differentiate coins from other objects.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.20 Using vocalization, sign language, augmentative communication, or assistive technology, identify U.S. coins by name (e.g., penny & dime).


    Geometry
    Reason with shapes and their attributes.
    Note: Students do not need to learn formal names such as "right rectangular prism."
    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    21. Build and draw shapes which have defining attributes.

    a. Distinguish between defining attributes and non-defining attributes.

    Examples: Triangles are closed and three- sided, which are defining attributes; color, orientation, and overall size are non-defining attributes.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • build and draw two dimensional shapes.
    • define attributes such as number of sides and the name of the shape.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Defining attribute
    • Non defining attribute
    • Closed
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • defining characteristics of basic shapes (triangles, rectangles, squares, circles).
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • use defining characteristics to build/draw and identify basic shapes.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • shapes may be sorted by many sets of attributes, but their geometric classification is based on certain defining attributes.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.21.1: Define side, angle, closed and open.
    M.1.21.2: Describe attributes of shapes.
    Examples: number of sides, number of angles.
    M.1.21.3: Identify two-dimensional shapes.
    M.1.21.4: Sort two-dimensional shapes.
    M.1.21.5: Identify basic attributes.
    Examples: color, shape, size.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Recognize attributes of shapes.
    • Identify cubes, cones, cylinders, and spheres.
    • Identify squares, circles, triangles, rectangles, and hexagons.
    • Identify shapes in the environment.
    • Trace shapes.
    • Make purpose marks such as lines and circles.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Begin to name and match sizes and shapes.
    • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
    • Point to matching or similar objects.
    • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
    • Sort objects on the basis of shape or color.
    • Understand and point to a triangle, a circle, a square and rectangle.
    • Understand the concept of same shape and size.
    • Understand that some have more, and some have less.
    • Name and match primary colors.
    • Sort objects on the basis of both color and shape.
    • Sort a variety of objects in a group that have one thing in common.
    • Recognize and sort familiar objects with the same color, shape, or size.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.21 Determine similarities and differences among shapes of the same size or different sizes and orientations (limited to circle, square, rectangle, and triangle).


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    22. Compose two-dimensional shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, and quarter-circles) or three-dimensional shapes (cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders) to create a composite shape, and compose new shapes from the composite shape.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • compose 2D shapes from smaller 2D shapes (e.g., use two right triangles to make a square or two squares to make a rectangle).
    • compose 3D shapes from smaller 3D shapes (e.g., use two cubes to make a rectangular prism or two triangular prisms to make a rectangular prism).
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Trapezoid
    • Right rectangular prism
    • Right circular cone
    • Right circular cylinder
    • Composite shape
    • Two dimensional
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • attributes of basic shapes (rectangles, squares, trapezoids, triangles, half-circles, quarter-circles, cubes, right rectangular prisms, right circular cones, and right circular cylinders).
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • use shape manipulatives to create composite shapes.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • composite shapes and figures are created by joining two or more geometric shapes together to create a different shape.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.22.1: Combine shapes to fill in the area of a given shape.
    M.1.22.2: Replicate composite shapes.
    M.1.22.3: Decompose pictures made of simple shapes.
    M.1.22.4: Name shapes.
    Examples: square, circle, triangle, rectangle, and hexagon.
    M.1.22.5: Recognize shapes.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Combine shapes to fill the area of a given shape.
    • Decompose pictures made of simple shapes.
    • Match shapes.
    • Match pieces by color, image, or shape to complete a puzzle.
    • Define similar and different.
    • Use vocabulary related to two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
      Examples: vertices (corners), faces (flat surfaces), edges, sides, angles.
    • Recognize vocabulary related to two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
    • Identify two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
    • Identify shapes.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Begin to name and match sizes and shapes.
    • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
    • Point to matching or similar objects.
    • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
    • Sort objects on the basis of shape.
    • Recognize and sort familiar objects with the same shape or size.
    • Understand and point to a triangle, a circle, a square and rectangle.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.22 Sort shapes of the same size and orientation (limited to circle, square, rectangle, and triangle).


    Mathematics (2019)
    Grade(s): 1
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    23. Partition circles and rectangles into two and four equal shares and describe the shares using the words halves, fourths, and quarters, and use the phrases half of, fourth of, and quarter of.

    a. Describe "the whole" as two of or four of the shares of circles and rectangles partitioned into two or four equal shares.

    b. Explain that decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares of circles and rectangles.
    Unpacked Content
    Evidence Of Student Attainment:
    Students:
    • divide shapes into two and four equal shares.
    • describe the whole as cut into halves, fourths, and quarters.
    • describe a set of like pieces as halves, fourths, quarters.
    • describes a single piece as half of, fourth of, or quarter of when compared to the whole.
    • describe the whole as two of, or four of the shares.
    • explain that cutting the shape into more shares creates smaller pieces.
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    • Partition
    Knowledge:
    Students know:
    • how to patition shapes into halves or fourths describe the shares using academic vocabulary.
    Skills:
    Students are able to:
    • decompose circles and rectangles into halves and fourths.
    • explain the size of pieces using the appropriate fraction terminology.
    • explain the relative size of halves and fourths by reasoning about the number of shares created.
    Understanding:
    Students understand that:
    • fractional parts of a whole are equal-sized portions of that whole.
    • decomposing into more equal shares creates smaller shares.
    Diverse Learning Needs:
    Essential Skills:
    Learning Objectives:
    M.1.23.1: Define halves, fourths, quarters, whole, parts (shares) and equal.
    M.1.23.2: Demonstrate sharing situations to show equal smaller shares.
    M.1.23.3: Distinguish between equal and non-equal parts.
    M.1.23.4: Decompose pictures made of simple shapes.
    M.1.23.5: Identify squares, circles, triangles and rectangles.

    Prior Knowledge Skills:
    • Combine shapes to fill the area of a given shape.
    • Decompose pictures made of simple shapes.
    • Match shapes.
    • Match pieces by color, image, or shape to complete a puzzle.
    • Define similar and different.
    • Use vocabulary related to two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
      Examples: vertices (corners), faces (flat surfaces), edges, sides, angles.
    • Recognize vocabulary related to two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
    • Identify two-dimensional shapes and three-dimensional figures.
    • Identify shapes.
    • Notice same/different and some/all.
    • Begin to name and match sizes and shapes.
    • Enjoy playing with all kinds of objects.
    • Point to matching or similar objects.
    • Understand that words can label sameness and differences.
    • Sort objects on the basis of shape.
    • Recognize and sort familiar objects with the same shape or size.

    Alabama Alternate Achievement Standards
    AAS Standard:
    M.AAS.1.23 Put together two equal size pieces to make a shape that relates to a whole (e.g., two semicircles to make a circle, two squares to make a rectangle).