Courses of Study : Social Studies

Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1 ) Construct daily schedules, calendars, and timelines.

•  Using vocabulary associated with time, including past, present, and future
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Construct hourly schedules to include home and school activities.
  • Construct monthly calendars to include: month, days, and dates.
  • Apply historical holidays and events (for example birthdays, MLK jr. Day, Presidents Day, etc.) to the calendars.
  • Use a timeline to share personal life from birth to present including pictures and significant dates.
  • Use a timeline to share famous historical figures, including those from Alabama (for example, Admiral Raphael Semmes', Emma Sansom, Rosa Parks, Martin Luther King Jr., Wernher Von Braun, Helen Keller, George Washington Carver).
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • construct
  • apply
  • uses
  • schedule
  • agenda
  • calendar
  • month
  • years
  • days of the week
  • timeline (picture/year)
  • elapsed time
  • past
  • long ago
  • present
  • yesterday
  • today
  • future
  • tomorrow
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The purpose of a schedule and how to construct a daily schedule (present).
  • The purpose of a calendar and how to construct a calendar (future).
  • The purpose of a timeline and how to construct a timeline (past).
  • Vocabulary: long ago, yesterday, today, tomorrow, past, present, future
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Sequence daily classroom activities.
  • Create a calendar.
  • Create a timeline.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Constructing schedules, calendars, and timelines helps document past, present, and/or future events.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2 ) Identify rights and responsibilities of citizens within the local community and state.

•  Describing how rules in the community and laws in the state protect citizens' rights and property
•  Describing ways, including paying taxes, responsible citizens contribute to the common good of the community and state
•  Demonstrating voting as a way of making choices and decisions
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify themselves as a citizen of their community.
  • Describe the use of rules and laws in the community and the state.
  • Identify the purpose of paying taxes and how this contributes to the betterment of the community.
  • Demonstrate the ability to vote and make choices through mock elections in the classroom.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • describe
  • demonstrate
  • rules
  • laws
  • rights
  • responsibilities
  • community
  • citizen
  • state
  • property
  • taxes
  • voting
  • choices
  • decisions
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How to identify their rights as students and citizens in their community and state.
  • How to have respect for their personal belongings and other's belongings.
  • How to understand rules and consequences of breaking rules as students and citizens in their community and state.
  • How to be responsible for classroom jobs and chores at home to contribute to the common good.
  • How to vote in order to make choices or decisions.
  • Vocabulary: rules, laws, rights, responsibilities, community, citizen, state, property, taxes, voting, choices and decisions
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Describe how rules and laws protect rights and property of the people in the community.
  • Describe ways responsible citizens contribute to the common good of the community and state (for example paying taxes).
  • Demonstrate voting as a way of making choices and decisions.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is an importance to their rights and responsibilities as citizens of their community and state.
  • Rules and laws protect citizens' rights and property.
  • It is important to make choices and decisions through voting. Citizens contribute to the common good of their community and state (for example, by paying taxes, conservation, volunteering, etc.).
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3 ) Recognize leaders and their roles in the local community and state. (Alabama)

•  Describing roles of public officials, including mayor and governor (Alabama)
•  Identifying on a map Montgomery as the capital of the state of Alabama (Alabama)
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Describe the roles of community helpers, mayor, city council, and governor.
  • Recognize current leaders in these roles.
  • Understand that Montgomery is the capital of the state of Alabama.
  • Identify Montgomery on a state map.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • recognize
  • describe
  • understand
  • identify
  • community helpers
  • mayor
  • city council
  • governor
  • capital
  • state
  • map
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The roles of leaders in the community and state including the governor and mayor.
  • The purpose of state map and that Alabama's capital is Montgomery.
  • Vocabulary: community helpers, mayor, city council, governor, capital, state, map
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Describe the roles of public officials in the state of Alabama and leaders in the local community.
  • Use a map to find location of Alabama and its capital Montgomery.
  • Describe and list examples of community helpers.
  • Recognize the role of a leader. Identify the capital on a state map.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Leaders in the local community and state, including mayor and governor, have certain roles.
  • The capital of Alabama is Montgomery.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 10
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 10
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4 ) Identify contributions of diverse significant figures that influenced the local community and state in the past and present. (Alabama)

Example: Admiral Raphael Semmes' and Emma Sansom's roles during the Civil War (Alabama)

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Understand the meaning of a contribution.
  • Identify significant contributors to Alabama by connecting the person to their contribution.
  • Distinguish between past and present contributors of Alabama (for example, Admiral Raphael Semmes, Emma Sansom).
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • understand
  • identify
  • distinguish
  • leaders
  • significant figures
  • contributions
  • contributor
  • state
  • past
  • present
  • roles
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The important contributions citizens make in their local community and state.
  • Vocabulary: leaders, significant figures, contributions, contributor, state, past, present, roles
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Read and comprehend the role of a contributor.
  • Understand how contributions affect the local community and state.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There were important contributions by significant figures, such as Admiral Raphael Semmes and Emma Sansom, who influence the local community and Alabama from the past and in the present.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 12
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 12
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5 ) Identify historical events and celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama. (Alabama)

Examples: Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Black History Month (Alabama)

•  Differentiating between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources
Example: fictional version of Pocahontas compared to an authentic historical account

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify celebrations within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Selma Bridge Crossing Jubilee, Black History Month).
  • Identify historical events within the understand fiction and nonfiction text about historical events within the local community and throughout Alabama (for example, Montgomery Bus Boycott, Ruby Bridges).
  • Identify fact as information provided through primary and secondary sources.
  • Identify fiction as stories that are created and passed down through history that are not based on factual information from primary and secondary sources.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • differentiate
  • identify
  • fact
  • fiction
  • celebrations
  • historical events
  • primary sources
  • secondary sources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The importance of celebrations and events in the local. community and throughout Alabama.
  • The purpose of primary and secondary sources.
  • Techniques to differentiate between fact and fiction.
  • Vocabulary: fact, fiction, celebrations, historical events, primary sources, secondary sources
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Identify, discuss, and list celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Differentiate between fact and fiction when sharing stories or retelling events using primary and secondary sources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are celebrations and historical events in the local community and throughout Alabama such as the Selma Bridge Crossing, Jubilee, Mardi Gras, Boll Weevil Festival, Montgomery Bus Boycott, and Black History Month.
  • Primary and secondary sources are an important way to differentiate between fact and fiction.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 18
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 18
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6 ) Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and state lived in the past to how they live today. (Alabama)

•  Identifying past and present forms of communication
Examples: past—letter, radio, rotary-dial telephone

present—e-mail, television, cellular telephone

•  Identifying past and present types of apparel
•  Identifying past and present types of technology
Examples: past—record player, typewriter, wood-burning stove

present—compact diskette (CD) and digital video diskette (DVD) players, video cassette recorder (VCR), computer, microwave oven

•  Identifying past and present types of recreation
Examples: past—marbles, hopscotch, jump rope

present—video games, computer games

•  Identifying past and present primary sources
Examples: past—letters, newspapers

present—e-mail, Internet articles

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: History, Civics and Government
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Compare ways individuals and groups in the local community and throughout Alabama lived in the past to how they live today.
  • Identify past and present forms of communication, apparel, technology recorder, recreation, primary sources.
  • Analyze pictures of the past and compare what is seen to the present.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compare
  • identify
  • analyze
  • past
  • present
  • communication
  • apparel
  • technology
  • recreation
  • primary sources
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Changes occur from past to present and can compare these changes.
  • Communication, apparel, technology, recreation, and primary sources show forms of change over time.
  • Individuals and groups in the local community and throughout Alabama provide information about changes in everyday life.
  • Vocabulary: past, present, communication, apparel, technology, recreation
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compare past and present forms of communication, apparel, technology, and recreation using primary sources in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Analyze pictures from the past to the present.
  • Write and speak about individuals and groups that lived in the past compared to those of the present.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • People in Alabama and the local community lived differently from past to present in areas such as communication, apparel, technology, recreation, and primary sources.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 12
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 12
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7 ) Describe how occupational and recreational opportunities in the local community and state are affected by the physical environment. (Alabama)

Examples: occupational—commercial fishing and tourism in Gulf coast areas (Alabama)

recreational—camping and hiking in mountain areas, fishing and waterskiing in lake areas

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify the occupational opportunities in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Identify recreational activities in the local community and throughout Alabama.
  • Understand how the occupational and recreational opportunities are affected by the physical environment.
  • Describe where occupational and recreational opportunities are available in relation to the physical environment of the local community and throughout Alabama.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • understand
  • describe
  • occupational
  • recreational
  • physical environment
  • mountain range
  • commercial fishing
  • tourism
  • coastal area
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The difference in jobs and play activities.
  • The physical environment in relation to mountains, waterways, and coast and the role it plays in occupational and recreational opportunities.
  • Vocabulary: occupational, recreational, physical environment, mountain range, commercial fishing, tourism, coastal area
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Compile a list of occupational and recreational opportunities in the state of Alabama.
  • Identify physical environment features in the state of Alabama.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The physical environment directly affects the occupational and recreational activities in the local community and throughout Alabama.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 26
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 25
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8 ) Identify land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features on maps and globes.

•  Explaining the use of cardinal directions and the compass rose
•  Measuring distance using nonstandard units
Example: measuring with pencils, strings, hands, feet

•  Using vocabulary associated with geographical features, including river, lake, ocean, and mountain
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Geography
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify on globes and maps the areas of land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features.
  • Use cardinal directions and a compass rose to explain locations of land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features.
  • Create a form of nonstandard measurement to measure distances between land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features.
  • Use appropriate geographical vocabulary to share features on globes and maps.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • create
  • use
  • land masses
  • bodies of water
  • physical features
  • cardinal directions
  • compass rose
  • nonstandard measurement
  • distance
  • geographical features
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The differences in land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features on maps and globes.
  • The use of cardinal directions and the compass rose.
  • Techniques for using nonstandard measurement.
  • Vocabulary: land masses, bodies of water, physical features, cardinal directions, compass rose, nonstandard measurement, distance, geographical features
Skills:
Student are able to:
  • Identify land masses, bodies of water, and other physical features on maps and globes.
  • State the purpose and use of cardinal directions and compass rose.
  • Identify nonstandard measurement.
  • Use nonstandard measurement for locating distances.
  • Use vocabulary that relates to geographical features (for example, river, lake, ocean, and mountain).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Land masses, bodies of water, and physical features can be identified on maps and globes.
  • Cardinal directions and the compass rose help us read maps.
  • Nonstandard measurements can be used to find distance.
  • There is an appropriate vocabulary to describe geographical features.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 22
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 21
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9 ) Differentiate between natural resources and human-made products.

•  Listing ways to protect our natural resources
Examples: conserving forests by recycling newspapers, conserving energy by turning off lights, promoting protection of resources by participating in activities such as Earth Day and Arbor Day

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Understand natural resources as resources that occur naturally in the environment.
  • Understand human-made products as products that are created by humans.
  • Identify ways to protect our natural resources.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • understand
  • identify
  • differentiate
  • natural resources
  • human-made
  • products
  • conserving
  • recycling
  • energy
  • Earth Day
  • Arbor Day
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • The difference between natural resources and human-made products.
  • Techniques for protecting natural resources (for example, turning off lights when leaving a room, throwing trash away, recycling paper and plastic, etc.).
  • Techniques for promoting protection of resources by participating in Earth Day and Arbor Day.
  • Vocabulary: natural resources, human-made products, conserving, recycling, reduces, reuse, energy, Earth Day, Arbor Day
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Understand what natural resources and human-made resources are.
  • Describe ways to protect and conserve natural resources.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There is a difference between natural resources and human-made products.
  • We must protect and conserve natural resources.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 6
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10 ) Describe the role of money in everyday life.

•  Categorizing purchases families make as needs or wants
•  Explaining the concepts of saving and borrowing
•  Identifying differences between buyers and sellers
•  Classifying specialized jobs of workers with regard to the production of goods and services
•  Using vocabulary associated with the function of money, including barter, trade, spend, and save
Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Understand the primary role of money in everyday life.
  • Categorize family purchases as needs or wants.
  • Explain the purpose of saving and borrowing.
  • Identify the differences between buyers and sellers.
  • Classify specialized jobs in relation to the product of goods and services.
  • Use vocabulary that is associated with the function of money.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • money
  • needs
  • wants
  • saving
  • borrowing
  • buyers
  • sellers
  • specialized jobs
  • goods
  • services
  • barter
  • trade
  • spend
  • save
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • How money plays a role in everyday life.
  • The difference between goods and services (for example, goods- food, toys, clothing; services - medical care, fire protection, law enforcement, library resources).
  • How money is the primary way to make purchases.
  • How money is earned through working (for example, job, chores, etc.).
  • The difference between purchases of needs and wants within their family.
  • How people save and borrow money.
  • How to differentiate between a buyer and seller.
  • Vocabulary: money, needs, wants, saving, borrowing, buyers, sellers, specialized jobs, goods, services, barter, trade, spend, save
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Recognize the primary role of money in everyday life.
  • Identify and describe needs and wants.
  • Describe saving and borrowing.
  • Describe buyers and sellers.
  • Describe the role specialized jobs play in the production of goods and services.
  • Identify and use appropriate vocabulary associated with the function of money (for example, barter, trade, spend, save).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Money plays a role in everyday life.
  • Families make purchases of needs and wants. Students understand the concept of saving and borrowing.
  • There is a difference between buyers and sellers.
  • We can classify the specialized jobs of workers with regard to production of goods and services.
  • There is an appropriate vocabulary to use to describe the function of money.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 25
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 24
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11 ) Identify traditions and contributions of various cultures in the local community and state. (Alabama)

Examples: Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, Geography, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Identify traditions of various cultures in the local community and Alabama (for example, Kwanzaa, Christmas, Hanukkah, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo).
  • Identify contributions of various cultures in the local community and Alabama (for example, celebrations, food, traditions).
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • identify
  • traditions
  • contributions
  • cultures
  • Kwanzaa
  • Hanukkah
  • Christmas
  • Fourth of July
  • Cinco de Mayo
  • cultural foods
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Techniques for identifying traditions and contributions of various cultures in the community and Alabama.
  • How to compare cultural similarities and differences (for example, celebrations, food, traditions).
  • Vocabulary: traditions, contributions, cultures, Kwanzaa, Hanukkah, Christmas, Fourth of July, Cinco de Mayo, cultural foods
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Describe traditions of various cultures.
  • Describe contributions of various cultures.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • There are traditions of various cultures in the local community and Alabama.
  • Various cultures have made important contributions to the local community and Alabama.
Social Studies (2010)
Grade(s): 1
Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
All Resources: 18
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 18
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12 ) Compare common and unique characteristics in societal groups, including age, religious beliefs, ethnicity, persons with disabilities, and equality between genders.

Insight Unpacked Content
Strand: Economics, History
Course Title: Living and Working Together in Family and Community and State
Evidence Of Student Attainment:
Students:
  • Understand the various ways people are grouped together as societal groups.
  • Identify types of societal groups.
  • Describe common characteristics of societal groups.
  • Describe unique characteristics of societal groups.
  • Compare the common and unique characteristics of societal groups.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • unique
  • characteristics
  • societal groups
  • religious beliefs
  • ethnicity
  • disability
  • gender
  • interests
  • equality
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • Technique for identifying common traits of people.
  • How to compare similarities in people.
  • Vocabulary: common, unique, characteristics, societal groups, age, religious beliefs, ethnicity, persons with disability, gender, interests, equality
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • Define societal groups.
  • Identify societal groups in the community.
  • Compare common and unique characteristics.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • The community is made up of many societal groups.
  • We can compare the common and unique characteristics of these societal groups.