Courses of Study : English Language Arts (Grade 3)

Recurring Standards
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 12
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 10
R1. Utilize active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings, following agreed-upon rules for participation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R1.
  • Active listening
  • Discussion
  • Conversation
  • Rules
  • Participation
Knowledge:
R1. Students know:
  • Active listening skills.
  • How to engage in discussions and conversations in a variety of settings.
  • Agreed-upon rules for participation.
Skills:
R1. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings.
  • Converse in pairs, small groups, and large groups.
  • Practice the agreed-upon rules for participation.
Understanding:
R1. Students understand that:
  • Conversations and discussions follow agreed-upon rules which help us actively listen and gain understanding.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
R2. Use knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences and word analysis skills to decode and encode words accurately.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R2.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Word-analysis skills
Knowledge:
R2. Students know:
  • Phoneme (sound) to grapheme (letter or letters) correspondences to encode (spell) words accurately.
  • Grapheme (letter or letters) to phoneme (sound) correspondences to decode (read) words accurately.
  • Word-analysis skills.
Skills:
R2. Students are able to:
  • Encode and decode words accurately using knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Encode and decode words accurately using word-analysis skills.
Understanding:
R2. Students understand that:
  • Mapping graphemes to phonemes is essential for learning to read or decode words efficiently.
  • Mapping phonemes to graphemes is essential for learning to spell or encode words efficiently.
  • Analyzing a word's structure helps to read and spell a word.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
R3. Expand background knowledge and build vocabulary through discussion, reading, and writing.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R3.
  • Background knowledge
  • Vocabulary
  • Discussion
Knowledge:
R3. Students know:
  • Relating experiences through discussions, reading, and writing will help build background knowledge and improve vocabulary.
Skills:
R3. Students are able to:
  • Connect new concepts to prior experiences to increase background knowledge through discussions, reading, and writing.
  • Construct the meaning of words through discussions, reading, and writing.
Understanding:
R3. Students understand that:
  • Background knowledge can increase by relating experiences to new ideas, topics, and words while participating in discussions, reading, and writing.
  • Vocabulary will increase by constructing the meaning of words while participating in discussions, reading, and writing.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 11
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 3
Classroom Resources: 6
R4. Use digital and electronic tools appropriately, safely, and ethically for research and writing, both individually and collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R4.
  • Digital tools
  • Electronic tools
  • Appropriately
  • Safely
  • Ethically
  • Research
  • Individually
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
R4. Students know:
  • Digital and electronic tools must be used appropriately, safely, and ethically.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be used for research or for writing tasks.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be independently or with others.
Skills:
R4. Students are able to:
  • Engage in safe and ethical behavior when using digital and electronic tools individually and collaboratively.
Understanding:
R4. Students understand that:
  • Safe behaviors, interactions that keep you out of harm's way, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
  • Ethical behavior, interactions that align to one's moral code, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 28
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 23
Unit Plans: 1
R5. Utilize a writing process to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writings in various genres.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R5.
  • Writing process
  • Plan
  • Draft
  • Revise
  • Edit
  • Publish
  • Genres
Knowledge:
R5. Students know:
  • The writing process steps are to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish.
  • Various genres of writing.
Skills:
R5. Students are able to:
  • Plan writings in various genres.
  • Draft writings in various genres.
  • Revise writings in various genres.
  • Edit writings in various genres.
  • Publish writings in various genres.
Understanding:
R5. Students understand that:
  • The writing process is a set of steps that make writing easier.
  • There are different categories, or genres, of writing that can be used for different purposes.
Literacy Foundations
Oral Language
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 0
1. Contribute meaningful ideas to discussions with groups and peers utilizing agreed upon rules.

a. Elaborate on responses in conversations and discussions.

Examples: use precise, descriptive language; build upon previously expressed ideas
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
1.
  • Contribute
  • Meaningful ideas
  • Discussions
  • Peers
  • Agreed upon rules
1a.
  • Elaborate
  • Conversations
  • Discussion
Knowledge:
1. Students know:
  • Strategies to actively engage in meaningful discussions utilizing agreed upon rules.
1a.
  • Elaboration strategies for conversations and discussions.
Skills:
1. Students are able to:
  • Contribute meaningful ideas to a discussion with groups and peers.
  • Appropriately participate in discussions with groups and peers utilizing agreed upon rules.
1a.
  • Expand their responses to others in conversations and discussions. For example use precise, descriptive language and build upon previously expressed ideas.
Understanding:
1. Students understand that:
  • Good conversations occur when participants actively listen, build on others' ideas, and ask clarifying questions.
1a.
  • By elaborating their responses, they are fully explaining, justifying, or defending their responses in conversation, which provides clarity to others participating in the conversations and discussions.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 3
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 2
2. Present information orally using complex sentence structures, appropriate volume, and clear pronunciation.

a. Use oral language for different purposes: to inform, to entertain, to persuade, to clarify, and to respond.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
2.
  • Present
  • Orally
  • Complex sentence structure
  • Appropriate volume
  • Clear pronunciation
2a.
  • Oral language
  • Inform
  • Entertain
  • Persuade
  • Clarify
  • Respond
Knowledge:
2. Students know:
  • Clear oral communication requires the speaker to use complex sentence structures, appropriate speaking volume, and correct speech pronunciation.
2a.
  • Oral language is used for different purposes.
  • Oral language can be used to inform about a topic, to provide an entertaining story, to persuade someone about a particular opinion, to further explain a topic, or to respond to someone else's ideas.
Skills:
2. Students are able to:
  • Form complex sentences, use appropriate voice volume based on the situation or environment, and use clear pronunciation when sharing information orally.
2a.
  • Use their listening and speaking skills to inform an audience about a topic.
  • Use their listening and speaking skills to entertain an audience.
  • Use their listening and speaking skills to further explain information or provide additional details.
  • Use their listening and speaking skills to respond to others' ideas or questions.
  • Use their listening and speaking skills to persuade an audience about a particular opinion.
Understanding:
2. Students understand that:
  • Presenting information orally requires them to use complex sentences, an appropriate voice volume for the setting, and speaking words clearly.
2a.
  • They can use their oral language skills for a variety of purposes, including informing others, entertaining others, persuading others, clarifying ideas, and responding to others.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
3. Apply oral literacy skills by participating in a variety of oral language activities.

Examples: plays, dramas, choral readings, oral reports
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
3.
  • Oral language activities
  • Oral literacy skills
Knowledge:
3. Students know:
  • Oral literacy skills include speaking, listening, and comprehending.
  • Oral language activities are those activities in which speakin, listening, and understanding are required.
Skills:
3. Students are able to:
  • Apply oral literacy skills when participating in various oral language activities, such as plays, dramas, choral readings, oral reports.
Understanding:
3. Students understand that:
  • They can learn, practice, and apply oral literacy skills by participating in a variety of oral language activities.
Speaking
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 0
4. Ask and answer questions using complete sentences and grade-level vocabulary.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
4.
  • Questions
  • Complete sentences
  • Grade-level vocabulary
Knowledge:
4. Students know:
  • Asking questions in complete sentences with grade-level vocabulary is a strategy to learn information.
  • Answering questions questions in complete sentences with grade-level vocabulary is a method to provide others with information.
Skills:
4. Students are able to:
  • Ask clarifying questions using complete sentences and grade-level vocabulary.
  • Answer questions using complete sentences and grade-level vocabulary.
Understanding:
4. Students understand that:
  • They can demonstrate active listening skills by asking and answering questions using complete sentences and grade-level vocabulary.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 0
5. Express ideas, opinions, and feelings orally in a logical sequence clearly, accurately, and precisely, using appropriate volume, clear pronunciation, and standard English grammar.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
5.
  • Ideas
  • Opinions
  • Feelings
  • Logical sequence
  • Accurately
  • Precisely
  • Appropriate volume
  • Clear pronunciation
  • Standard English grammar
Knowledge:
5. Students know:
  • Orally communicating ideas, opinions, and feelings, requires a logical sequence, accurate and precise language, appropriate voice volume, clear speech pronunciation, and the use of standard English grammar.
Skills:
5. Students are able to:
  • Orally express ideas, opinions, and feelings in a logical sequence and with accurate and precise language.
  • Use appropriate voice volume, clear speech pronunciation, and standard English grammar when orally presenting ideas, opinions, and feelings.
Understanding:
5. Students understand that:
  • When presenting their ideas, opinions, and feelings orally, they must use a logical sequence, an appropriate volume for speaking, clear pronunciation of words, and standard English grammar, so others can clearly comprehend (understand) what they are trying to express.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 0
6. Use digital tools to enhance oral presentations, working collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Oral Language
Teacher Vocabulary:
6.
  • Digital tools
  • Oral presentations
  • Enhance
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
6. Students know:
  • Digital tools often refer devices like computers, laptops, etc.
  • Digital tools can help improve or enhance oral presentations.
Skills:
6. Students are able to:
  • Use digital tools to create visual aids to enhance oral presentations.
  • Work collaboratively.
Understanding:
6. Students understand that:
  • Digital tools can help aid their oral presentations because their peers can see visual representations and can gain a better understanding of the information.
Phonological Awareness/Phonemic Awareness
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 0
7. Demonstrate advanced phonemic awareness skills in spoken words.

a. Delete phonemes in initial and final blends of a spoken word.

Examples: Say smoke. Now say smoke, but don't say /m/. (soak)
Say best. Now say best, but don't say /s/. (bet)

b. Substitute phonemes in initial and final blends in a spoken word.

Examples: Say sweep. Now say sweep, but change the /w/ to /l/. (sleep) Say list. Now say list, but change the /s/ to /f/. (lift)

c. Reverse phonemes in a spoken word.

Examples: Say safe. Now say safe but say the last sound first and the first sound last. (face)
Say slack. Now say slack but say the last sound first and the first sound last. (class)

d. In a series of words, apply phoneme chaining that changes only one sound at a time to show addition, deletion, substitution and resequencing of sounds from one word to the next.

Examples: sap, lap, lip, slip, slit, lit; gob, cob, cub, cup, cap; train, rain, lane, lame, blame

e. Use knowledge of syllable and affix substitution and deletion to demonstrate morphological changes.

Examples: Say photograph. Change graph to cell. (photocell)
Say anytime. Change time to where. (anywhere)
Say blocked. Change /t/ to /ing/. (blocking)
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonological Awareness/Phonemic Awareness
Teacher Vocabulary:
7.
  • Demonstrate
  • Advanced phonemic awareness skills
  • Spoken words
7a.
  • Delete
  • Phonemes
  • Initial
  • Final
  • Blends
  • Spoken words
7b.
  • Substitute
  • Phonemes
  • Initial
  • Final
  • Blends
  • Spoken word
7c.
  • Reverse
  • Phonemes
  • Spoken word
7d.
  • Series
  • Apply
  • Phoneme chaining
  • Addition
  • Deletion
  • Substitution
  • Resequencing
7e.
  • Demonstrate
  • Syllable substitution
  • Affix substitution
  • Deletion
  • Morphological changes
Knowledge:
7. Students know:
  • Phonemic awareness is the ability to identify and manipulate the individual phonemes (sounds) in spoken words.
7a.
  • A blend is made up of two or more sounds (phonemes).
  • A blend can occur at the beginning or end of a word.
7b.
  • Substituting phonemes means changing phonemes.
  • A blend is made up of two or more sounds (phonemes).
  • A blend can occur at the beginning or end of a word.
7c.
  • Reverse means to change the sequence of sounds to an opposite order.
7d.
  • Addition means add to, deletion means take away from, substitution means change, and resequencing means changes the order of.
  • Words can be manipulated by changing only one sound at a time.
7e.
  • A syllable is a unit of speech organized around a vowel sound.
  • Multisyllabic words can be divided into individual syllables.
  • Affixes are word parts that can be changed or deleted to create words or change words.
  • Morphology refers to the meaningful units of a word that are combined to make the whole word.
Skills:
7. Students are able to:
  • Identify individual phonemes in words and manipulate those sounds.
7a.
  • Delete phonemes in spoken words with an initial blend. For example, say smoke. Now say smoke, but don't say /m/. (soak).
  • Delete phonemes in spoken words with a final blend. For example, say best. Now say best, but don't say /s/. (bet).
7b.
  • Substitute phonemes in spoken words with an initial blend. For example, say sweep. Now say sweep, but change the /w/ to /l/. (sleep).
  • Substitute phonemes in spoken words with a final blend. For example, say list. Now say list, but change the /s/ to /f/. (lift).
7c.
  • Reverse sounds in a spoken word by saying the last sound first and the first sound last. For example, say safe. Now say safe but say the last sound first and first sound last. (face).
7d.
  • Change one sound in a word at a time using phoneme addition, deletion, and substitution to resequence sounds in a phoneme chain; for example, sap, lap, lip, slip, slit, lit; gob, cob, cub, cup, cap; train, rain, lane, lame, blame.
7e.
  • Create new words by substituting and deleting affixes to change words and word meanings. For example, say photograph. Change graph to cell. (photocell) Say anytime. Change time to where. (anywhere) Say blocked. Change /t/ to /ing/. (blocking).
Understanding:
7. Students understand that:
  • Spoken words are made up of one or more phonemes.
  • They can demonstrate advanced phonemic awareness skills by manipulating those phonemes through additions, deletions, reversals, and substitutions of phonemes.
  • Advanced phonemic awareness skills will help them improve their reading, spelling, and writing.
7a.
  • By deleting phonemes in the initial and final blends of words, they are able to identify all the sounds within the word and demonstrate advanced phonemic awareness skills.
  • Blends are made of more than one sound, and they can delete different sounds within a blend to create a new word.
7b.
  • New words can be created by substituting, or changing, sounds (phonemes) within the word.
  • Blends are made of more than one sound, and they can interchange different sounds within a blend to create a new word.
7c.
  • Spoken words can be manipulated by reversing the first and last sounds.
7d.
  • They can demonstrate advanced phonemic awareness skills by changing one sound in a word to create a chain (or group of words).
  • Words can be manipulated by adding, deleting, substituting, and resequencing sounds.
7e.
  • They can change words to create new words with different meanings by substituting and deleting affixes.
  • Understanding the meaning of individual word units is called morphology.
Phonics
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Classroom Resources: 4
8. Apply knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences, multisyllabic word construction, and syllable division principles to decode and encode (spell) words accurately in isolation and in context.

a. Decode multisyllabic words with common syllable patterns, including open/closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, and odd or schwa syllables.

b. Apply knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles to decode grade-appropriate multisyllabic words.

Examples: VC/CV, V/CV, VC/V, CV/VC; com-mit-ment, e-vent, ev-er-y, po-et

c. Decode and encode words with three-consonant blends, digraphs, trigraphs, quadrigraph eigh, combinations, diphthongs, and silent letter combinations.

Examples: spl-, str-, scr-, squ-; th, sh, ch, ck, ph; tch, dge, igh; er, ir, ar, or; oi, oy, ou, ow; kn, gn, mb, wr, gh

d. Decode and encode words with graphemes that represent multiple sound-symbol correspondences by applying knowledge of most common to least common frequency.

Examples: y can be read /y/ in yet, /ē/ in candy, /ī/ in fly
digraph ch can be read /ch/ in chair, /sh/ in chef, and /k/ in school
diphthong ow is read /ou/ in cow, but digraph ow is read /ō/ in snow

e. Decode and encode multisyllabic words using knowledge of stress or accent to pronounce a word correctly, including the schwa sound when appropriate.

Examples: the noun con'/vict vs. the verb con/vict'; the noun pro'/duce vs. the verb pro/duce'

f. Decode and encode words using knowledge of the morphological structure of a word, including prefixes, suffixes, and roots.

Examples: fore-, anti-, post-, sub-; -ment, -hood, -er, -or; port, ject, form, dict

g. Decode and encode contractions with am, is, has, not, have, would, and will.

Examples: I'm, he's, she's, isn't, don't, I've, he'd, they'll

h. Decode and encode frequently confused homophones accurately using knowledge of English and meaning to facilitate learning.

Examples: hear/here; night/knight; tacks/tax

i. Decode and encode words with hard and soft c and g.

j. Decode and encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular and irregular phoneme-grapheme correspondences, using knowledge of the specific sound-symbol correspondences that are irregular.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
8.
  • Phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Multisyllabic word construction
  • Syllable division principles
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Isolation
  • In context
8a.
  • Decode
  • Multisyllabic words
  • Common syllable patterns
  • Open syllable
  • Closed syllable
  • vowel-r syllable
  • Vowel-consonant-e syllable
  • Vowel team syllable
  • Consonant-le syllable
  • Odd syllable
  • Schwa syllable
8b.
  • Multisyllabic word construction
  • Syllable division principles
  • Decode
  • Grade-appropriate multisyllabic words
8c.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Three-Consonant blends
  • Digraphs
  • Trigraphs
  • Quadrigraph
  • Combinations
  • Diphthongs
  • Silent letter combinations
8d.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Graphemes
  • Sound-Symbol correspondences
  • Apply
  • Knowledge
  • Most common frequency
  • Least common frequency
8e.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Multisyllabic words
  • Stress
  • Accent
  • Pronounce
  • Schwa sound
8f.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Knowledge
  • Morphological structure
  • Prefixes
  • Suffixes
  • Roots
8g.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Contractionse
8h.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Frequently confused homophones
  • Accurately
  • Knowledge of English
8i.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Hard c
  • Soft c
  • Hard g
  • Soft g
8j.
  • Decode
  • Encode
  • Grade-appropriate high frequency words
  • Regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Irregular phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Sound-symbol correspondences
Knowledge:
8. Student know:
  • Spoken words can be represented in print by using letter symbols (graphemes) to represent sounds (phonemes).
  • Printed words can be read by saying the sound (phoneme) that is represented by the letter symbols (graphemes).
  • Multisyllabic words contain more than one syllable, and multisyllabic words can be constructed by combining individual syllables.
  • Syllable division is breaking words apart by the syllables.
  • Decode means to read, and encode means to spell.
  • Decoding and encoding in isolation means reading or spelling a single word, while in context refers to these skills within a larger text.
8a.
  • Accurately decoding multisyllabic words requires knowledge of common syllable types.
  • Syllable patterns are principles that help divide words into parts with one vowel sound that can be easily decoded.
8b.
  • Multisyllabic words can be constructed by combining syllables.
  • Syllable division principles help divide words into parts with one vowel sound based on predictable patterns.
8c.
  • Three-consonant blends are a combination of three consonants in which each represents a phoneme sound.
  • Digraphs are two letter combination that represents a single phoneme sound in which neither letter represents its usual sound.
  • Trigraphs are three letter combinations that represents a single phoneme sound.
  • Quadrigraph eigh is a combination of four letters that represents a single phoneme sound.
  • Combinations are two letters that frequently appear together and have an associated phoneme.
  • Diphthongs are single vowel phonemes that glide in the middle.
  • Silent letter combinations are letter combinations in which one or more letters is silent (does not represent a phoneme), but another letter does represent the phoneme.
8d.
  • Graphemes can represent more than one sound.
  • Graphemes represent some sounds more often than other sounds.
8e.
  • Some sounds in words have a stronger emphasis or are heard more clearly and loudly than other sounds within the words.
  • The schwa sound refers to an "empty" vowel in an unaccented syllable, meaning the spelling for the vowel sound is difficult to identify.
8f.
  • Prefixes are word parts that can be added to the beginning of a word to change the meaning of the word.
  • Suffixes are word parts that can be added at the end of the word to change the meaning of the word.
  • The root word is the base word in which a prefix or suffix can be added.
  • Morphology refers to the meaningful units of a word that are combined to make the whole word.
8g.
  • Contractions are words that are combined, or shortened, and an apostrophe represents the omitted letters.
8h.
  • Homophones have the same pronunciation, but different meanings, origins, and/or spellings.
8i.
  • The hard sound of c is /k/.
  • The soft sound of c is /s/.
  • The hard sound of g is /g/.
  • The soft sound of g is /j/.
  • The spelling generalizations associated with hard and soft c and g.
8j.
  • Grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Grade-appropriate high frequency words that do not follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • The part of a word that does not follow the regular phoneme-grapheme correspondence.
Skills:
8. Students are able to:
  • Read and spell words accurately in isolation and in context based on their knowledge of phoneme-grapheme relationships, multisyllabic word construction, and syllable division principles.
8a.
  • Decode words with more than one syllable using their knowledge of common syllable types: open, closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, odd, and schwa.
8b.
  • Decode grade-appropriate multisyllabic words using knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles; for example, VC/CV, com-mit,ment; V/CV, e-vent; VC/V, ev-er-y; CV/VC, po-et.
8c.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with three-consonant blends, such as spl-, str-, scr-, squ-.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with consonant digraphs, such as th, sh, ch, ck, ph.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with consonant trigraphs, such as tch, dge, igh.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with combinations, such as er, ir, ar, or.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with diphthongs, such as oi oy, ou, ow.
  • Accurately decode and encode words with silent letter combinations, such as kn, gn, mb, wr, gh.
8d.
  • Decode and encode words that contain graphemes that represent multiple sound-symbol correspondences, using their knowledge of the most common and least common sound-symbol correspondence; for example, y can be read /y/ in yet, /ē/ in candy, /ī/ in fly.
8e.
  • Decode multisyllabic words using knowledge of stressed and unstressed syllables and the schwa sound, such as the noun con'/vict, vs. the verb con/vict'; the noun pro'/duce vs. the verb pro/duce'.
  • Encode multisyllabic words using knowledge of the stressed and unstressed syllables and the schwa sound.
8f.
  • Decode and encode words with prefixes, suffixes, or both, using their knowledge of the morphological structure of words.
8g.
  • Decode and encode contractions with the words am, is, has, not, have, would, and will, such as I'm, he's, she's, isn't, don't, I've, he'd, they'll.
8h.
  • Accurately decode and encode homophones using their understanding of the English language and word meaning; for example, hear/here, night/knight, tacks/tax.
8i.
  • Decode and encode words with the hard and soft c.
  • Decode and encode words with the hard and soft g.
8j.
  • Decode and encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
  • Decode and encode grade-appropriate high frequency words that follow irregular phoneme-grapheme correspondences, using knowledge of the sound-symbol correspondences that are irregular.
    Understanding:
    8. Students understand that:
    • To read (decode), they must accurately say the sounds (phonemes) that are represented by the letter symbols (graphemes).
    • To spell (encode), they must accurately represent the letter symbols (graphemes) that correspond to the spoken sounds (phonemes).
    • They can use syllable division principles to accurately decode and encode words.
    • They can use their knowledge of the six syllable types to accurately decode and encode words.
    • They will sometimes use these skills in isolation, and other times in context when reading or writing a longer text.
    8a.
    • They can decode (read) multisyllabic words by dividing the words into syllables and applying their knowledge of syllable patterns.
    8b.
    • Multisyllabic words are composed of more than one syllable.
    • They can create words that are multisyllabic by combining individual syllables.
    • They can use the syllable division principles to help with decoding grade-appropriate words.
    8c.
    • Some words have special combinations of letters that can be decoded and encoded using their knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    8d.
    • Knowing that some graphemes represent multiple sounds strengthens their phonics skills so they are able to readily read and spell words that are both common and not common.
    8e.
    • Knowing stresses and accents in words and how they are pronounced, can help them read and spell the correct word required by the context.
    8f.
    • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them read and spell most multisyllabic words if they break them apart into smaller morphemes.
    8g.
    • Contractions are combinations of more than one word and use an apostrophe in place of the omitted letters.
    8h.
    • Homophones are words that can be confused so it is important to pay attention to the word's meaning in context (whether in written text or oral conversation) to determine the correct spelling of the homophone.
    8i.
    • The letter that follows a c or g determines the sound that c or g will make in a word.
    • C makes a hard sound when it comes before a, o, u, or any consonant, and it makes a soft sound when it comes before i, e, or y.
    • G makes a hard sound when it comes before a, o, u, or any consonant, and it makes a soft sound when it comes before i, e, or y.
    8j.
    • Some high frequency words have regular phoneme-grapheme correspondences, while others have irregular spelling patterns that they must learn to be able to read and spell the words accurately.
    Fluency
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    9. Apply previously-taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences to multisyllabic words with accuracy and automaticity, in and out of context.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    9.
    • Apply
    • Previously-taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences
    • Multisyllabic words
    • Accuracy
    • Automaticity
    • In context
    • Out of context
    Knowledge:
    9. Students know:
    • Previously-taught phoneme-grapheme correspondences in multisyllabic words.
    • Accuracy is reading the word correctly, and automaticity is reading the word quickly without having to sound it out.
    • Out of context means reading word by itself, while in context refers to reading words within a larger text.
    Skills:
    9. Students are able to:
    • Read multisyllabic words with accuracy and automaticity in and out of context by applying knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    Understanding:
    9. Students understand that:
    • Automatic recall of phoneme-grapheme correspondences will help them decode multisyllabic words accurately and become a fluent reader.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 1
    Learning Activities: 1
    10. Read and reread grade-appropriate text accurately, automatically, and with meaningful expression at a rate which supports comprehension.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    10.
    • Reread
    • Grade-appropriate text
    • Accurately
    • Automatically
    • Meaningful expression
    • Rate which supports comprehension
    Knowledge:
    10. Students know:
    • Accurately means reading without mistakes, and automatically means knowing the words immediately without sounding them out.
    • Techniques to make appropriate changes in voice, pitch, and expression while reading orally.
    • Reading must occur at a speed (rate) that supports understanding of the text.
    • Rereading is a strategy that aids in word recognition and comprehension.
    Skills:
    10. Students are able to:
    • Read and reread words that are third grade-appropriate with little to no mistakes.
    • Read words quickly without pausing to sound them out.
    • Read and reread at a pace that supports comprehension of the text.
    Understanding:
    10. Students understand that:
    • They should read text with accuracy, automaticity, and meaningful expression at a pace that helps them comprehend the text they are reading.
    • They can reread text to improve their accuracy, automaticity, and comprehension.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 3
    Learning Activities: 3
    11. Read and reread grade-appropriate poetry, practicing phrasing, rhythm, rhyme, and meaningful expression.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    11.
    • Reread
    • Grade-appropriate poetry
    • Phrasing
    • Rhythm
    • Rhyme
    • Meaningful expression
    Knowledge:
    11. Students know:
    • The features of poetry include phrasing, rhythm, and rhyme.
    • Words rhyme if their vowel and ending sounds are the same (example: ham, Sam).
    • Rhythm is a steady beat made by stressed syllables in spoken words.
    • A phrase is a group of words.
    • Strategies to show meaningful expression, including making appropriate changes in voice, pitch, and expression while reading poetry orally.
    Skills:
    11. Students are able to:
    • Read and reread grade-appropriate poetry.
    • Practice rhyming, stressing syllables that create rhythm, grouping together words in phrases, and meaningful expression when reading poetry.
    Understanding:
    11. Students understand that:
    • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings.
    • They can reread poetry to practice their use of phrasing, rhythm, rhyme, and meaningful expression.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    12. Read high-frequency words commonly found in grade-appropriate text accurately and automatically.

    Note: High-frequency words should be taught with the main emphasis of the lesson being on regular correspondences and patterns within the word. The student should be able to read the word accurately three times in a row on different days to be considered accurate enough to add to a personal word box, word ring, or fluency folder. Avoid teaching high-frequency words as "sight words" that need to be memorized as a whole word, unless there are no regular correspondences in the word. "Of" is an example of a word with no regular correspondences
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Fluency
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    12.
    • High-frequency words
    • Grade-appropriate text
    • Commonly
    • Accurately
    • Automatically
    Knowledge:
    12. Students know:
    • High frequency words that are common found in third-grade level text.
    • Accurately means reading without mistakes, and automatically means knowing the words immediately without sounding them out.
    Skills:
    12. Students are able to:
    • Read high-frequency words in third grade-level text accurately and automatically three times in a row on different days.
    Understanding:
    12. Students understand that:
    • High-frequency words are words that are found regularly in grade-appropriate text, so it is important to learn to read them automatically, accurately, and independently.
    Vocabulary
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 10
    Classroom Resources: 10
    13. Utilize new academic, content-specific, grade-level vocabulary to make connections to previously learned words and relate new words to background knowledge.

    a. Make connections to a word's structure using knowledge of phonology, morphology, and orthography of the word to aid learning.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    13.
    • Utilize
    • Academic vocabulary
    • Content-specific vocabulary
    • Grade-level vocabulary
    • Connections
    • Relating
    • Background knowledge
    13a.
    • Word structure
    • Phonology
    • Morphology
    • Orthography
    Knowledge:
    13. Students know:
    • Academic, content-specific, grade-level vocabulary words.
    • Content-specific vocabulary refers to words used in different subjects learned in school such as reading, math, social studies, science.
    • New vocabulary words can be learned by relating them to previously learned words and background knowledge.
    13a.
    • Phonology (speech sounds within words).
    • Morphology (meaningful units of words).
    • Orthography (the written representation of language).
    Skills:
    13. Students are able to:
    • Use new academic, content-specific vocabulary by making connections to previously learned words.
    • Use new academic, content-specific vocabulary by relating new words to background knowledge.
    13a.
    • Make connections to a word's structure using speech sounds, meaningful word parts, and spelling of the word to aid learning.
    Understanding:
    13. Students understand that:
    • Academic, content-specific vocabulary words are used in different school subjects, like reading, math, social studies, and science.
    • They can learn new vocabulary words by making connections to previously learned words or their background knowledge.
    13a.
    • Identifying a word's phonological, morphological, and orthographic structure can help them determine the meaning of a word, as well as the word's origin.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 13
    Classroom Resources: 13
    14. Describe word relationships and nuances in word meanings, including relating them to their opposites and distinguishing shades of meaning in similar or related words, including nouns, verbs, and adjectives.

    a. Determine meaning of words using synonyms in context.

    b. Determine meaning of words using antonyms as a clue.

    c. Describe the similarities and differences between related words.

    d. Use knowledge of homophones to determine appropriate use of words.

    e. Interpret figurative language.

    f. Identify relationships and nuances in word meanings to determine real-life connections between words and their use.
    Examples: Discuss relationships in words related to home (house, residence, habitat) and give reasons for choosing a particular word in speaking or writing.
    Distinguish shades of meaning in words related to bad (terrible, awful, horrible) and give reasons for choosing a particular word in speaking or writing.
    Distinguish shades of meaning in words related to talk (yell, scream, bellow) and give reasons for choosing a particular word in speaking or writing.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    14.
    • Describe
    • Word relationships
    • Nuances
    • Opposites
    • Distinguishing
    • Shades of meaning
    • Similar words
    • Related words
    • Nouns
    • Verbs
    • Adjectives
    14a.
    • Determine
    • Synonyms
    • Context
    14b.
    • Determine
    • Antonyms
    • Clue
    14c.
    • Similarities
    • Differences
    • Related words
    • Describe
    14d.
    • Homophones
    14e.
    • Interpret
    • Figurative language/li>
    14f.
    • Word relationships
    • Nuances in word meanings
    • Identify
    • Real-life connections
    Knowledge:
    14. Students know:
    • Word relationships and nuances in word meanings.
    • Words with opposite meanings are antonyms, and words with similar meanings are synonyms.
    • A noun is a person, place, thing, or idea.
    • A verb expresses an action or state of being.
    • An adjective describes a noun or pronoun.
    14a.
    • Synonyms are words that have similar meanings.
    • The meaning of an unfamiliar word can be identified using synonyms.
    14b.
    • Antonyms are words that have opposite meanings.
    • The meaning of an unfamiliar word can be identified using antonyms.
    14c.
    • Related words can be described by their similarities and differences.
    14d.
    • Homophones have the same pronunciation, but different meanings, origins, and/or spellings.
    14e.
    • Figurative language is a creative way to use words and phrases beyond their literal definition to explain or describe something.
    14f.
    • Writers and speakers use a variety of words to distinguish between specific intended meanings.
    • Real life means situations that they have experienced or will experience, and they can make real-life connections about how vocabulary words can be used.
    Skills:
    14. Students are able to:
    • Describe the relationships between words and nuances in word meanings.
    • Describe how the meaning of words are alike or different.
    • Describe the nuances of words that have different shades of meaning.
    14a.
    • Use synonyms to interpret word meaning in context.
    14b.
    • Use antonyms as a clue to interpret word meaning.
    14c.
    • Describe how the meaning of related words are alike and different.
    14d.
    • Determine appropriate homophone use based on their knowledge of homophones and context clues.
    14e.
    • Interpret figurative language to understand its meaning.
    14f.
    • Discuss relationships of words and give reasons for choosing to use a particular word in writing or speaking; for example, words related to home include house, residence, and habitat.
    • Distinguish shades of meaning in related words, and give reasons for choosing to use a particular word in writing or speaking; for example, words related to bad with different nuances include terrible, awful, horrible.
    Understanding:
    14. Students understand that:
    • Writers and speakers should carefully select words to convey specific meanings, ideas, and relationships.
    • Words have relationships with other words and words have subtle differences that can be distinguished within text.
    14a.
    • Synonyms are words that have similar meanings, and they can be used to determine the meaning of a new vocabulary word.
    14b.
    • Antonyms are words that have opposite meanings, and they can be used to determine the meaning of a new vocabulary word.
    14c.
    • Identifying the similarities and differences of related words improves their vocabulary knowledge.
    14d.
    • Their knowledge and understanding of homophones can help determine the correct word to use when given context clues.
    14e.
    • Figurative language carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases .
    14f.
    • Writers and speakers carefully select words to convey specific meanings, ideas, and relationships.
    • Making real-life connections to new vocabulary words helps them move the new words to their long-term memory, becoming part of their "ready to use" vocabulary.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 4
    Classroom Resources: 4
    15. Analyze meaningful parts (morphemes) of words and phrases in discussions and/or text.

    a. Identify meaningful parts of words (morphemes) and use them as clues to the meaning of unfamiliar words, including base words, roots, and frequently occurring affixes and inflections.

    Examples: affixes -less, -ful, pro-, trans- ; roots aqua, cent, port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer

    b. Apply knowledge of the changes in tense (-ed), number (-s), and degree (-er and -est) signified by inflected endings to determine the meaning of a word.

    c. Identify common and derivational prefixes and suffixes and use them as clues to a word's meaning.

    Examples: pre-, re-, mis-; -ly, -less, -ful, -able, -ment

    d. Identify common Latin and Greek roots and use them to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words.

    e. Sort words with shared and varied suffixes by parts of speech.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    15.
    • Analyze
    • Meaningful parts
    • Morphemes
    • Words
    • Phrases
    15a.
    • Meaningful parts of words
    • Morphemes
    • Clues
    • Unfamiliar words
    • Base words
    • Roots
    • Affixes
    • Inflections
    15b.
    • Knowledge
    • Tense
    • Number
    • Degree
    • Inflected endings
    • Determine
    15c.
    • Identify
    • Common and derivational prefixes
    • Common and derivational suffixes
    15d.
    • Identify
    • Common Latin roots
    • Common Greek roots
    • Determine
    15e.
    • Sort
    • Suffixes
    • Parts of speech
    Knowledge:
    15. Students know:
    • Morphemes are the smallest unit in a word that carry meaning.
    • Words and phrases can be divided into morphemes to identify the meaning of the word or phrase.
    15a.
    • Morphemes are the smallest unit in a word that carry meaning.
    • Morphemes can be used to determine meanings of words.
    • Affixes and inflections can be added to words to change their meaning.
    15b.
    • Inflected endings are added to words to show that a word's meaning has changed in tense, number, or degree.
    15c.
    • Prefixes and suffixes change a word's meaning.
    15d.
    • Many English words and English morphemes originated from ancient Latin and Greek languages.
    • Understanding Latin and Greek roots can provide clues to meanings of unknown words.
    15e.
    • Suffixes are word parts that are added to the ends of words.
    • Parts of speech are words that can be categorized by their function in a sentence.
    • Different parts of speech require different types of suffixes.
    Skills:
    15. Students are able to:
    • Identify and analyze morphemes of words and phrases in discussions and/or text.
    15a.
    • Identify morphemes and use them as clues to determine word meaning, including affixes like -less, -ful, pro-, trans- and roots like aqua, cent, port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer.
    15b.
    • Apply knowledge of inflectional endings to determine meaning of words.
    15c.
    • Identify common and derivational prefixes, such as pre-, re-, mis-, and use them as clues to learn a word's meaning.
    • Identify common and derivational suffixes, such as -ly, -less, -ful, -able, -ment, and use them as clues to learn a word's meaning.
    15d.
    • Identify and use Latin and Greek roots as clues to the meaning of a word.
    15e.
    • Sort words with suffixes by parts of speech.
    Understanding:
    15. Students understand that:
    • Morphemes are meaningful word parts, and they can help find the meaning of unfamiliar words.
    15a.
    • Base words, roots, affixes, inflections and other morphemes can be used to help find the meaning of unfamiliar words.
    15b.
    • When a word has an inflected ending, the meaning of the base word has changed.
    • When an -ed is added to a verb, it signifies the verb happened in the past.
    • When an -s is added to a noun, it signifies the noun is plural (more than one).
    • When an -er or -est is added to the end of an adjective it changes the degree of comparison.
    15c.
    • Prefixes and suffixes change a word's meaning.
    15d.
    • The meaning of an unknown word can be learned by knowing the orthography of the word, including its origin.
    15e.
    • When a suffix is added to the end of a word, it changes the meaning of the word.
    • Each part of speech provides a different type of information.
    • Words can be categorized by parts of speech.
    • English orthography dictates that only particular suffixes can be added to each part of speech.
    Reading
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    16. Use knowledge of grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary to gain meaning from text.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    16.
    • Academic vocabulary
    • Domain-specific vocabulary
    Knowledge:
    16. Students know:
    • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
    • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
    • Vocabulary knowledge can be used to comprehend text.
    Skills:
    16. Students are able to:
    • Use knowledge of third grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary words to accurately comprehend text.
    Understanding:
    16. Students understand that:
    • Learning the meaning of academic, domain-specific vocabulary words will help them comprehend text in a variety of subject areas.
    Writing
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    17. Use grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary in writing.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Vocabulary
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    17.
    • Academic vocabulary
    • Domain-specific vocabulary
    • Writing
    Knowledge:
    17. Students know:
    • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
    • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
    • Academic, domain-specific vocabulary words should be used in writing to clearly communicate ideas.
    Skills:
    17. Students are able to:
    • Use third grade-level academic and domain-specific vocabulary words in writing.
    Understanding:
    17. Students understand that:
    • Using academic and domain-specific vocabulary words in writing makes their writing more interesting and helps to clearly communicate their message.
    Comprehension
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 31
    Learning Activities: 3
    Lesson Plans: 3
    Classroom Resources: 25
    18. Demonstrate content knowledge built during independent reading of informational and literary texts by participating in content-specific discussions with peers and/or through writing.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    18.
    • Demonstrate
    • Content knowledge
    • Independent reading
    • Informational text
    • Literary text
    • Content-specific discussions
    Knowledge:
    18. Students know:
    • Content knowledge is information learned about a specific subject.
    • Content knowledge can be learned by independently reading text.
    • Informational text is nonfiction text, and literary text is fictional.
    • Active listening skills.
    • Writing skills.
    Skills:
    18. Students are able to:
    • Build content knowledge from independently reading informational or literary text.
    • Use content knowledge learned from independent reading in content-specific discussions with peers.
    • Use content knowledge learned from independent reading in writing.
    Understanding:
    18. Students understand that:
    • Content-specific discussions with peers can demonstrate the content knowledge they learned through independent reading.
    • They can produce writings that demonstrate knowledge of content-specific information.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 17
    Learning Activities: 2
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Classroom Resources: 10
    Unit Plans: 1
    19. Determine the explicit or implied main idea and supporting details of a text.

    a. Explain how supporting details contribute to the main idea, using textual evidence.

    b. Recount or summarize the key ideas from the text.

    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    19.
    • Explicit main idea
    • Implied main idea
    • Supporting details
    19a.
    • Supporting details
    • Main idea
    • Textual evidence
    19b.
    • Recount
    • Summarize
    • Key ideas
    Knowledge:
    19. Students know:
    • The main idea is the most important idea presented in the text.
    • Sometimes an author will clearly state the main idea, while other times an author will merely suggest the main idea.
    • The supporting details explain the main idea or provide more information about the main idea.
    19a.
    • The supporting details explain the main idea or provide more information about the main idea.
    • Textual evidence is quotations from the text that are used to provide information.
    19b.
    • Key ideas are important details within a text.
    • Recount means to retell the big ideas of the text.
    • Summarize means to briefly state the big ideas of the text.
    Skills:
    19. Students are able to:
    • Identify the main idea in of a text.
    • Determine if the main idea is explicitly stated or implies.
    • Identify the supporting details of a text.
    19a.
    • Explain how the supporting details provide more information about the main idea, using evidence from the text.
    19b.
    • Retell or summarize the most important (key) ideas from a text.
    Understanding:
    19. Students understand that:
    • Literary and informational texts have a main idea, or most important message, and supporting details, which provide more information about the main idea.
    • An author can choose to state the main idea in the text or provide clues to imply the main idea.
    • A text usually just has one main idea, but multiple supporting details.
    19a.
    • The supporting details help explain the main idea or provide more information about the main idea.
    19b.
    • Texts have key ideas, and they can retell or summarize these important ideas to demonstrate comprehension of the text.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    20. Establish a purpose before reading literary and informational texts to enhance comprehension, including identifying background knowledge and generating questions about the topic or characters.

    Examples: reading for pleasure, application, or information; to identify a theme or an author's purpose
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    20.
    • Establish
    • Purpose
    • Literary text
    • Informational text
    • Comprehension
    • Identify
    • Background knowledge
    • Generating questions
    • Topic
    • Characters
    Knowledge:
    20. Students know:
    • There are different purposes for reading.
    • Authors write text for different purposes.
    Skills:
    20. Students are able to:
    • Establish a purpose for reading literary and informational text, such as reading for pleasure, application, or information; to identify a theme or an author's purpose.
    • Establish a purpose for reading by identifying their current background knowledge and generating questions about the topic or characters in the text.
    Understanding:
    20. Students understand that:
    • There are different purposes for reading, and establishing their purpose before engaging in reading can improve their overall comprehension of literary and informational text.
    • To establish a purpose for reading, they can reflect upon their current background knowledge of a topic or generate questions about the topic or characters in the text.
    Reading
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    21. Identify and interpret various cohesive devices that link words and sentences to one another within the text.

    Examples: pronoun references, conjunctions, word substitution using synonyms

    Note: Working with cohesive devices is a scaffold to building comprehension at both sentence and paragraph levels.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    21.
    • Identify
    • Interpret
    • Cohesive devices
    • Link
    Knowledge:
    21. Students know:
    • Words and sentences can be joined together with certain words, phrases, or references.
    Skills:
    21. Students are able to:
    • Identify cohesive devices that link together words and sentences within a text, such as pronoun references, word substitution using synonyms, and conjunctions.
    • Interpret cohesive devices to build comprehension at the sentence and paragraph levels.
    Understanding:
    21. Students understand that:
    • Cohesive devices, like pronoun references, word substitution, and conjunctions, can link words and sentences together within the larger body of text.
    • To fully comprehend a text, they must understand the meaning of the cohesive devices.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 25
    Learning Activities: 4
    Lesson Plans: 2
    Classroom Resources: 19
    22. Describe literary elements within a story, including setting, plot, characters, and themes.

    a. Describe in detail the characters' behavior, emotions, and traits and explain how their actions influence events in the story.

    b. Explain how the characters' actions and dialogue contribute to the meaning of the story.

    c. Identify the central message, theme, or moral in a story, including myths, fables, and folktales, and explain the meaning conveyed in the passage.

    d. Compare and contrast the themes, settings, and plots from two texts.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    22.
    • Describe
    • Literary elements
    • Story
    • Setting
    • Plot
    • Characters
    • Themes
    22a.
    • Describe
    • Character
    • Behaviors
    • Emotions
    • Traits
    • Actions
    • Influence
    • Events
    22b.
    • Explain
    • Characters
    • Actions
    • Dialogue
    • Contribute
    • Meaning
    22c.
    • Central message
    • Theme
    • Moral
    • Myths
    • Fables
    • Folktales
    • Conveyed
    22d.
    • Compare
    • Contrast
    • Theme
    • Setting
    • Plot
    • Stories
    Knowledge:
    22. Students know:
    • Literary elements within a story include the setting, plot, characters, and themes.
    • Setting is when and where a story takes place.
    • Plot is the main events of a story (often referred to as the beginning, middle, and end of a story).
    • Characters are any person, animal, or figure that affect the plot.
    • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text.
    22a.
    • A story author provides descriptions of the characters' behavior, emotions, and traits.
    • The actions of characters in a story affect the events, or plot, of the story.
    22b.
    • The actions of characters in a story affect the events, or plot, of the story.
    • The dialogue, or spoken words, of characters in a story affect the plot of the story.
    22c.
    • Qualities of myths, fables, and folktales.
    • Many stories have a central message, theme, or moral.
    • A central message or moral is the lesson that is learned through the story or the one big idea of the story.
    • The central message, theme, or moral is conveyed through key details.
    22d.
    • Compare means tell how things are alike or similar.
    • Contrast means tell how things are different.
    • Literary elements from different texts, like themes, settings, and plots, can be compared and contrasted.
    • Setting is when and where a story takes place.
    • Plot is the main events of a story (often referred to as the beginning, middle, and end of a story).
    • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text.
    Skills:
    22. Students are able to:
    • Identify and describe the literary elements, including setting, plot, characters, and theme, within the text.
    22a.
    • Provide a detailed description of story characters' behavior, emotions, and traits.
    • Explain how story characters' actions affect the events of the story.
    22b.
    • Explain how the actions of characters' contribute to the meaning of the story.
    • Explain how the dialogue between two or more characters contributes to the meaning of the story.
    22c.
    • Identify the central message, theme, or moral of a story, including myths, fables, and folktales.
    • Explain the meaning of the central message, theme, or moral conveyed in the passage.
    22d.
    • Compare and contrast literary elements, such as themes, settings, and plots, of two texts.
    Understanding:
    22. Students understand that:
    • Identifying and describing literary elements within a story will help in comprehending the text.
    22a.
    • Understanding each character's behavior, emotions, and traits will help them better understand a story's plot.
    • Characters in a story drive the plot by engaging in different actions.
    22b.
    • Characters' actions and dialogue contribute to the meaning of a story.
    • Understanding the actions and dialogue of story characters improves overall comprehension of the text.
    22c.
    • Understanding the meaning of the central message, theme, or moral of a story will improve overall comprehension of the passage.
    • Myths, fables, and folktales are types of narrative stories that often include a moral.
    22d.
    • Comparing and contrasting literary elements can improve their comprehension, or understanding, of both texts.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 23
    Learning Activities: 5
    Lesson Plans: 4
    Classroom Resources: 13
    Unit Plans: 1
    23. Identify and use text features in informational passages to locate information.

    Examples: headings, photographs, illustrations, labels, charts, graphs, legends

    a. Explain how text features support details in the text.

    b. Explain how illustrations contribute to meaning in a story.

    c. Interpret text features used in written and digital formats.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    23.
    • Text features
    • Locate
    • Informational passage
    • Identify
    23a.
    • Explain
    • Text features
    • Supporting details
    • Text
    23b.
    • Explain
    • Illustrations
    • Contribute
    • Meaning in a story
    23c.
    • Interpret
    • Text features
    • Written formats
    • Digital formats
    Knowledge:
    23. Students know:
    • Informational passages often include text features that can be used to locate information within the text.
    23a.
    • Text features can provide additional or clarifying information about details in a text.
    23b.
    • Illustrations included with a story can contribute to the story's meaning.
    23c.
    • Text features can be used in printed (written) and digital text.
    Skills:
    23. Students are able to:
    • Identify text features in informational passages, such as headings, photographs, illustrations, labels, charts, graphs, legends.
    • Use text features to locate information within an informational passage.
    23a.
    • Identify text features and explain how the text features supports details in a text.
    23b.
    • Identify an illustration and explain how it contributes to the meaning of the story.
    23c.
    • Interpret text features presented in a digital format.
    • Interpret text features presented in a written format.
    Understanding:
    23. Students understand that:
    • Informational passages have predictable features that can be used to locate important information within the text.
    • Text features that are often used in informational text include headings, photographs, illustrations, labels, charts, graphs, and legends.
    • Using text features helps support their overall comprehension.
    23a.
    • An author chooses to include text features to provide additional information, clarify information, or enhance ideas with in a text.
    • Using text features supports their comprehension of details in a text.
    23b.
    • Authors and illustrators choose to include illustrations to enhance the meaning of the story provided in the text.
    23c.
    • Text features are often included in written (printed) text and digital text.
    • In either format, text features can be used to locate information or enhance overall comprehension.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    24. Identify the text structures within literary and informational texts.

    a. Explain how the structures, including comparison and contrast, sequence of events, problem and solution, and cause and effect, contribute to the meaning of the text, using textual evidence.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    24.
    • Identify
    • Text structures
    • Literary text
    • Informational text
    24a.
    • Text structures
    • Comparison and contrast
    • Sequence of events
    • Problem and solution
    • Cause and effect
    • Contribute
    • Textual evidence
    Knowledge:
    24. Students know:
    • Literary and informational texts follow predictable structures.
    24a.
    • Compare means tell how things are similar, and contrast means tell how things are different.
    • Sequence of events is the chronological order of events within a text.
    • Problem and solution text structure describes a problem and how the problem was solved or could be solved.
    • Cause and effect text structure describes an event (the cause) and the consequence or result of the event (the effect).
    • They have to use quotations from the text to prove their answers.
    Skills:
    24. Students are able to:
    • Identify the text structure of literary texts.
    • Identify the text structure of informational texts.
    24a.
    • Explain how text structures contribute to the meaning of the text.
    • Provide textual evidence to support their explanation.
    Understanding:
    24. Students understand that:
    • Identifying the text structure of literary and informational texts will set a purpose for their reading and improve their comprehension.
    24a.
    • Texts follow a predictable structure that contributes to the overall meaning of the text.
    • They can demonstrate their comprehension of a text by using textual evidence to support their explanations.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    25. Identify statements in informational texts as facts or opinions.

    a. Use prior knowledge and/or details from the text to distinguish fact from opinion.

    b. Use information gathered from research to evaluate opinions.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    25.
    • Identify
    • Statements
    • Informational text
    • Facts
    • Opinions
    25a.
    • Prior knowledge
    • Details
    • Distinguish
    • Fact
    • Opinion
    25b.
    • Information
    • Research
    • Evaluate
    • Opinions
    Knowledge:
    25. Students know:
    • A fact is a statement that can be proven with evidence.
    • An opinion is a personal belief that cannot be proven true in every case.
    • Informational text can present both facts and opinions.
    25a.
    • The difference between facts and opinions.
    • Prior knowledge and/or details from the text can be used to identify facts and opinions.
    25b.
    • Research happens when you look up information about a topic.
    • Opinions are what someone thinks or feels and cannot be proven true or false, but they can be evaluated based on evidence.
    Skills:
    25. Students are able to:
    • Identify facts within an informational text.
    • Identify opinions within an informational text.
    25a.
    • Distinguish between facts and opinions using their prior knowledge.
    • Distinguish between facts and opinions using details from the text.
    25b.
    • Identify the opinions within a text.
    • Gather information from research about a particular statement.
    • Use the information gathered from research to determine if the opinion makes sense or contributes to the text.
    Understanding:
    25. Students understand that:
    • A fact is a thing that is known or proved to be true, and an opinion is a personal view or judgment about something.
    • To fully comprehend a text, they must distinguish between facts and opinions.
      • 25a.
        • They can determine if a statement is a fact or an opinion using their current knowledge or by referencing details in a text.
        25b.
        • They can evaluate, or make judgments about, opinions by using newly gained information from research.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 5
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 4
    26. Use text comparisons (text to text, text to self, and text to world) to make meaning.

    a. Use prior knowledge to determine similarities between texts they are reading and texts they have previously read.

    b. Compare different versions of the same story.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    26.
    • Text comparison
    • Text to text
    • Text to self
    • Text to world
    • Meaning
    26a.
    • Prior knowledge
    • Determine
    • Similarities
    26b.
    • Compare
    • Versions
    Knowledge:
    26. Students know:
    • Comparison is identifying similarities between two things.
    • Text to text comparison means to identify similarities between two texts.
    • Text to self comparison means to identify similarities between a text and a personal experience.
    • Text to world comparison means to identify similarities between a text and a current event or background knowledge.
    26a.
    • Prior knowledge is what they already know.
    • Information gathered from texts they have previously read becomes part of their prior knowledge.
    26b.
    • Comparison is identifying similarities between two things.
    Skills:
    26. Students are able to:
    • Compare two texts to make meaning of the information presented in the text.
    • Compare a text to their personal experiences to make meaning of the information presented in the text.
    • Compare a text to a current event or their background knowledge to make meaning of the information presented in the text.
    26a.
    • Use prior knowledge to make comparisons between texts.
    • Determine similarities between a text they are currently reading and a text that have read in the past.
    26b.
    • Identify similarities between different versions of the same story.
    Understanding:
    26. Students understand that:
    • Their comprehension will be enhanced by making multiple connections between texts, themselves, and the real world.
    26a.
    • Their prior knowledge can help make connections between texts.
    • Each text they read increases their background knowledge, and they can make connections to new texts to improve their comprehension.
    26b.
    • Different authors can produce different versions of the same story.
    • They can improve their comprehension by making connections between two similar texts.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 16
    Classroom Resources: 16
    27. Read prose, poetry, and dramas, identifying the literary devices used by the author to convey meaning.

    Examples: personification, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, symbolism, metaphor, simile
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    27.
    • Prose
    • Poetry
    • Dramas
    • Identifying
    • Literary devices
    • Author
    • Convey meaning
    Knowledge:
    27. Students know:
    • Literary text often includes literary devices, such as personification, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, symbolism, metaphor, and simile.
    • An author uses literary devices to convey meaning within the text.
    Skills:
    27. Students are able to:
    • Identify the literary devices when reading prose, poetry, and dramas.
    Understanding:
    27. Students understand that:
    • Literary devices are a special type of language that an author uses to convey meaning in literary text.
    • Literary devices are language that carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 4
    Learning Activities: 3
    Classroom Resources: 1
    28. Identify the narration of a literary text as first person or third person.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    28.
    • Identify
    • Narration
    • Literary text
    • First person
    • Third person
    Knowledge:
    28. Students know:
    • Literary text can be narrated from a first person or third person point of view.
    • Pronouns used by the author can indicate the narrator's point of view.
    Skills:
    28. Students are able to:
    • Identify the narration of a literary text as first person or third person.
    Understanding:
    28. Students understand that:
    • In first person narration the narrator is a character in the story and is telling the story from their perspective. The pronouns I, me, we, or us are often used.
    • In third person narration, the narrator is not part of the story and the characters never acknowledge the narrator's presence. The pronouns he, she, it, or they are often used.
    Listening
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 6
    Classroom Resources: 6
    29. Determine the main idea of a text read aloud or information presented in an audible format.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    29.
    • Determine
    • Main idea
    • Information
    • Audible format
    Knowledge:
    29. Students know:
    • Active listening skills.
    • Strategies to determine the main ideas of a text.
    Skills:
    29. Students are able to:
    • Demonstrate active listen skills.
    • Determine the main ideas of a text read aloud or information presented in an audible format.
    Understanding:
    29. Students understand that:
    • To comprehend a text that is read aloud or presented in an audible format, they must use active listening skills.
    • Identifying the main idea of a text can contribute to their overall comprehension.
    Writing
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    30. Manipulate words and/or phrases to create compound sentences, including coordinating conjunctions for, and, nor, but, or, yet, or so, and complex sentences to help build syntactic awareness and comprehension at the sentence level.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Comprehension
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    30.
    • Manipulate
    • Phrases
    • Compound sentences
    • Coordinating conjunctions
    • Complex sentences
    • Syntactic awareness
    • Comprehension
    • Sentence level
    Knowledge:
    30. Students know:
    • A complete compound sentence includes two subjects and two predicates and expresses two complete thoughts.
    • A complete compound sentence must include a coordinating conjunction to link the two complete thoughts.
    • A complex sentence expresses two thoughts, one complete thought and one incomplete thought, that are joined by a subordinating conjunction or relative pronoun.
    Skills:
    30. Students are able to:
    • Manipulate words and/or phrases to create compound and complex sentences in their writing.
    • Use coordinating conjunctions to combine two simple sentences into a compound sentence in their writing.
    Understanding:
    30. Students understand that:
    • They can improve their reading comprehension and build syntactic awareness by using different types of sentences in their writing.
    • They can join two simple sentences with a coordinating conjunction to form a compound sentence.
    • They can create a complex sentence by using a subordinate conjunction or relative pronoun.
    • Writers vary their sentence structure to engage their readers.
    Writing
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    31. Write legibly in cursive with connected, correctly-formed letters and appropriate spacing between words.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    31.
    • Legibly
    • Cursive
    • Connected letters
    • Correctly-formed letters
    • Appropriate spacing
    Knowledge:
    31. Students know:
    • Legible writing can be read by others.
    • Cursive writing strokes for all letters.
    • Cursive writing connects the letters within words.
    • Appropriate spacing should occur between words.
    Skills:
    31. Students are able to:
    • Write legibly in cursive.
    • Connect and correctly form cursive letters.
    • Include appropriate spacing between words.
    Understanding:
    31. Students understand that:
    • Cursive writing is a special type of writing that connects letters within words.
    • Appropriate spacing is important so that readers can tell where one cursive word ends and the next begins.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 7
    Learning Activities: 3
    Lesson Plans: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    32. Apply knowledge of grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences, multisyllabic word construction, syllable division rules, and spelling rules (or generalizations) to encode words accurately.

    a. Apply knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles to encode multisyllabic words.

    Examples: VC/CV, V/CV, VC/V, CV/VC; com-mit-ment, e-vent, ev-er-y, po-et

    b. Encode multisyllabic words, using common syllable patterns: open/closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, and odd or schwa syllables.

    c. Encode words with two and three letter blends and previously taught digraphs, trigraphs, combinations, diphthongs, quadrigraph eigh, vowel y, hard and soft c and g, silent letter combinations, and contractions.

    d. Encode words with less common prefixes, suffixes, and common Latin roots.

    Examples: prefixes: fore-, pro-, intra-, inter-, trans-, non-, over-, sub-, super-, semi-, anti-, mid-, ex-, post-
    suffixes: -y, -ly, -ful, -ment, -hood, -less, -ness, -er, -or, -en
    Latin roots: port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer

    e. Encode frequently confused homophones accurately, using context to determine correct spelling.

    Examples: hear/here; night/knight; tacks/tax
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    32.
    • Knowledge
    • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences
    • Multisyllabic word construction
    • Syllable division rules
    • Spelling rules
    • Generalizations
    • Encode
    • Accurately
    32a.
    • Apply
    • Knowledge
    • Multisyllabic word construction
    • Syllable division principles
    • Encode
    • Multisyllabic words
    32b.
    • Encode
    • Multisyllabic words
    • Common syllable patterns
    • Open syllable
    • Closed syllable
    • vowel-r syllable
    • Vowel-consonant-e syllable
    • Vowel team syllable
    • Consonant-le syllable
    • Odd syllable
    • Schwa syllable
    32c.
    • Encode
    • Two letter blends
    • Three letter blends
    • Digraphs
    • Trigraphs
    • Combinations
    • Diphthongs
    • Quadrigraph eigh
    • Hard and soft c
    • Hard and soft g
    • Silent letter combinations
    • Contractions
    32d.
    • Encode
    • Prefixes
    • Suffixes
    • Common Latin roots
    32e.
    • Encode
    • Frequently confused homophones
    • Context
    Knowledge:
    32. Students know:
    • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences.
    • Multisyllabic words are words that are composed of two or more syllables.
    • Syllable division principles.
    • Spelling rules (or generalizations).
    • To encode accurately means to spell a word correctly.
    32a.
    • Multisyllabic words can be constructed by combining syllables.
    • Syllable division principles help divide words into parts with one vowel sound based on predictable patterns.
    32b.
    • Accurate encoding of multisyllabic words requires knowledge of common syllable types.
    • Syllable patterns are principles that help divide words into parts with one vowel sound that can be easily spelled.
    32c.
    • Two letter blends are a combination of two consonants in which each represents a phoneme sound.
    • Three letter blends are a combination of three consonants in which each represents a phoneme sound.
    • Digraphs are two letter combination that represents a single phoneme sound in which neither letter represents its usual sound.
    • Trigraphs are three letter combinations that represents a single phoneme sound.
    • Combinations are two letters that frequently appear together and have an associated phoneme.
    • Diphthongs are two vowels that represent a single vowel phonemes that glide in the middle.
    • Quadrigraph eigh is a combination of four letters that represents a single phoneme sound.
    • The letter y can represent three different vowel sounds depending on the number of syllables in the words and its position in a word.
    • The spelling generalizations associated with hard and soft c and g.
    • Silent letter combinations are letter combinations in which one or more letters is silent (does not represent a phoneme), but another letter does represent the phoneme.
    • Contractions are words that are combined, or shortened, and an apostrophe represents the omitted letters.
    32d.
    • Prefixes are word parts that can be added to the beginning of a word to change the meaning of the word.
    • Suffixes are word parts that can be added at the end of the word to change the meaning of the word.
    • The root word is the base word in which a prefix or suffix can be added, and many English words contain Latin root words.
    32e.
    • Homophones have the same pronunciation, but different meanings, origins, and/or spellings.
    • Context clues must be used to determine the correct spelling of a homophone.
    Skills:
    32. Students are able to:
    • Accurately encode (spell) single syllable and multisyllabic words using their knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences, multisyllabic word construction, syllable division principles, and spelling generalization.
    • Accurately divide words into syllables to spell multisyllabic words correctly.
    32a.
    • Encode multisyllabic words using knowledge of multisyllabic word construction and syllable division principles; for example, VC/CV, com-mit,ment; V/CV, e-vent; VC/V, ev-er-y; CV/VC, po-et.
    32b.
    • Encode words with more than one syllable using their knowledge of common syllable types: open, closed, vowel-r, vowel-consonant-e, vowel teams, consonant-le, odd, and schwa.
    32c.
    • Accurately encode words with previously taught letter patterns, such as two letter blends, three letter blends, digraphs, trigraphs, combinations, diphthongs, quadrigraph eigh, vowel y, hard and soft c and g, silent letter combinations, and contractions.
    32d.
    • Encode words with less common prefixes, such as fore-, pro-, intra-, inter-, trans-, non-, over-, sub-, super-, semi-, anti-, mid-, ex-, post-.
    • Encode words with less common suffixes, such as -y, -ly, -ful, -ment, -hood, -less, -ness, -er, -or, -en.
    • Encode words with common Latin roots, such as port, form, ject, spect, dict, tend, fer.
    32e.
    • Accurately encode homophones using context clues to determine the correct spelling; for example, hear/here, night/knight, tacks/tax.
    Understanding:
    32. Students understand that:
    • To spell (encode), they must accurately represent the letter symbols (graphemes) that correspond to the spoken sounds (phonemes).
    • They can use syllable division principles to break a word apart to make it easier to spell.
    • They can use their knowledge of the six syllable types to accurately encode words.
    • There are spelling rules, or generalizations, in the English language that can help them spell words accurately.
    32a.
    • Multisyllabic words are composed of more than one syllable.
    • They can write and spell words that are multisyllabic by dividing the word into syllables and spelling each syllable, then combining the individual syllables to construct complete word.
    32b.
    • They can encode (spell/write) multisyllabic words by dividing the words into syllables and applying their knowledge of syllable patterns.
    32c.
    • Knowing the sound-symbol correspondences of common letter patterns will help them encode (spell/write) words accurately.
    32d.
    • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them read and spell most multisyllabic words if they divide them apart into smaller units.
    • Knowing less common prefixes and suffixes and common Latin roots strengthens their spelling skills.
    32e.
    • Homophones are words that can be confused so it is important to pay attention to the word's meaning in context (whether in written text or oral conversation) to determine the correct spelling of the homophone.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 19
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 3
    Classroom Resources: 15
    33. Write personal or fictional narratives with a logical plot (sequence of events), characters, transitions, and a sense of closure.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    33.
    • Personal narrative
    • Fictional narrative
    • Logical plot
    • Sequence of events
    • Characters
    • Transitions
    • Closure
    Knowledge:
    33. Students know:
    • A narrative is a piece of writing that tells a story.
    • A personal narrative tells about an event that was personally experienced by the author, while a fictional narrative tells a made up story.
    • A narrative story describes a sequence of events in a logical order (beginning, middle, end) and provides a sense of closure as an ending.
    • A narrative story describes the actions, thoughts, and feelings of the characters.
    • Narrative transitions indicate when and where the story is occurring.
    Skills:
    33. Students are able to:
    • Write a personal narrative that recalls a personal experience or a fictional narrative with a made-up story.
    • Write a narrative with a logical sequence of events and details that describe how the characters feels, acts, and thinks.
    • Use appropriate transitions in narrative writing.
    • Write a narrative that ends with a sense of closure.
    Understanding:
    33. Students understand that:
    • Narrative writing includes predictable elements, like a logical sequence of events and an ending that provides the reader with a sense of closure.
    • Because narrative writing describes a chronological sequence of events, it includes transitions that indicate the time and place in which the story is occurring.
    • Narrative writing can be used to tell about something that happened to them personally or it can tell a story they made up.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 15
    Learning Activities: 1
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 12
    Unit Plans: 1
    34. Write informative or explanatory texts about a topic using sources, including an introduction, facts, relevant details with elaboration, and a conclusion.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    34.
    • Informative text
    • Explanatory text
    • Sources
    • Topic
    • Introduction
    • Facts
    • Relevant details
    • Elaboration
    • Conclusion
    Knowledge:
    34. Students know:
    • Informative or explanatory text is a piece of writing that provides factual information that was gathered from research sources.
    • Informative or explanatory text begins by introducing the topic, provides facts and relevant details, and ends with a conclusion.
    • Elaboration means to supply additional information about a detail by using academic, content-specific vocabulary or by including text features.
    Skills:
    34. Students are able to:
    • Gather information from sources.
    • Write an informative or explanatory text using information gathered from sources.
    • Write an informative or explanatory text that begins with introducing the topic, provides facts and details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
    • Elaborate on details included in the text.
    Understanding:
    34. Students understand that:
    • Informative or explanatory writing follows a predictable text structure that includes introducing the topic, providing facts or additional details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
    • They must gather their facts about the topic from a research source.
    • Informative or explanatory writing can be used to tell facts about a topic.
    • Writers elaborate details included in the text by using academic, content-specific vocabulary and text features.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 6
    Learning Activities: 2
    Lesson Plans: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    35. Write an argument to convince the reader to take an action or adopt a position, using an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence from various sources, and a conclusion.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    35.
    • Argument
    • Take an action
    • Adopt a position
    • Introduction
    • Logical reasoning
    • Evidence
    • Sources
    • Conclusion
    Knowledge:
    35. Students know:
    • The purpose of argumentative writing is to convince the reader to take action or adopt a particular position.
    • Argumentative writing includes an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a concluding statement.
    • Evidence to support the argument must be collected from various sources.
    Skills:
    35. Students are able to:
    • Write an argument to convince a reader to take action or adopt a position.
    • Include an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a conclusion in argumentative writing.
    • Gather evidence from various sources to support a claim.
    Understanding:
    35. Students understand that:
    • To persuade a reader to take action or adopt an opinion, they must present logical reasoning supported by evidence from various sources.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 29
    Learning Activities: 4
    Classroom Resources: 25
    36. Demonstrate knowledge of the rules of standard English grammar including punctuation, capitalization, sentence formation, and spelling appropriate for third grade.

    a. Use articles a, an, and the correctly.

    b. Identify the role of a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, and conjunction within a sentence and explain the type of the information it conveys.

    c. Form plural nouns, verbs, and possessives, including irregular plural nouns and verbs.

    d. Use simple abbreviations, including days of the week, months of the year, titles, units of metric and customary measurement, street names, and state names.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    36.
    • Demonstrate
    • Knowledge
    • Rules of standard English grammar
    • Punctuation
    • Capitalization
    • Sentence formation
    • Spelling
    36a.
    • Articles
    36b.
    • Identify
    • Role
    • Noun
    • Verb
    • Adjective
    • Adverb
    • Pronoun
    • Preposition
    • Conjunction
    • Information
    • Conveys
    36c.
    • Form
    • Plural noun
    • Plural verb
    • Plural possessives
    • Irregular plural nouns
    • Irregular plural verbs
    36d.
    • Simple abbreviations
    Knowledge:
    36. Students know:
    • Standard English grammar and spelling conventions.
    • Punctuation marks and their appropriate usage.
    • Capitalization rules for standard English.
    • Complete sentences have a subject and predicate and end with an ending punctuation mark.
    36a.
    • The articles a, an, and the come before a noun to show if it's specific or general.
    • The is used to refer to specific or particular nouns.
    • A and an are used to refer to a non-specific, general noun.
    • A is generally used before nouns that start with a consonant sound.
    • An is generally used before nouns that start with a vowel sound.
    36b.
    • There are different types of words within a sentence, and each word provides a particular type of information.
    • The role of a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, and conjunction within a sentence.
    36c.
    • A plural shows there is more than one of something.
    • An -s or -es suffix is added to the end of regular nouns and verbs for subject-verb agreement and to form plurals.
    • Possessives show ownership and an apostrophe is used in the formation of possessives.
    • A plural possessive is used when a plural noun has ownership, or possession, of something.
    • Some nouns and verbs do not follow the regular pattern when forming a plural.
    36d.
    • An abbreviation is a shortened version of a whole word and it will usually have a period at the end of the shortened version.
    Skills:
    36. Students are able to:
    • Demonstrate knowledge of the rules of standard English grammar.
    • Use appropriate punctuation.
    • Use correct capitalization.
    • Form sentences correctly.
    • Spell third grade level words correctly.
    36a.
    • Correctly use the articles a, an, and the in writing.
    36b.
    • Identify a noun, verb, adjective, adverb, pronoun, preposition, and conjunction in a sentence.
    • Explain the type of information nouns, verbs, adjectives, adverbs, pronouns, prepositions, and conjunctions provides in a sentence.
    36c.
    • Form plural nouns, verbs, and possessives in writing.
    • Form irregular nouns and verbs in writing.
    36d.
    • Form correct abbreviations for days of the week, months of the year, titles, units of metric and customary measurement, street names, and state names in writing.
    Understanding:
    36. Students understand that:
    • There are rules to forming grammatically correct sentences in standard English.
    • When writing, they must use punctuation correctly, capitalize appropriate words, form complete sentences with subject-verb agreement, and spell the words that are appropriate for third graders.
    36a.
    • Articles are a part of speech that can come before a noun to indicate if the noun is specific (Bring me the book) or general (Bring me a book.)
    • A is usually used before nouns that start with a consonant sound, while an is usually used before words that start with a vowel sound.
    36b.
    • Each word in a sentence plays an important role in conveying meaning.
    • A noun names a person, place, thing, or idea and tells who or what the sentence is about.
    • A verb expresses an action or a state of being and tells what the noun is doing.
    • An adjective describes a noun or a pronoun and tells attributes of the noun.
    • An adverb describes a verb, adjective, or adverb, and provides more description about another word in the sentence.
    • A pronoun can be used in place of a noun.
    • A preposition is placed before a noun or pronoun to create a prepositional phrase that modifies (changes the meaning of) another word in the sentence.
    • A conjunction joins words, phrases, or clauses and indicates the relationship between the joined units; there are coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions.
    36c.
    • There are standard English grammar conventions to make nouns, verbs, and possessives plural, and following these conventions helps make their writing clear.
    • Some nouns and verbs do not form plurals in a regular way.
    36d.
    • Abbreviations can be used in place of whole words when writing.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 6
    Classroom Resources: 6
    37. Compose simple, compound, and complex sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.

    a. Identify and correct sentence fragments and run-on sentences.

    b. Identify the subject and predicate of a sentence.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    37.
    • Compose
    • Simple sentence
    • Compound sentence
    • Complex sentence
    • Subject-verb agreement
    37a.
    • Sentence fragments
    • Run-on sentences
    37b.
    • Identify
    • Subject
    • Predicate
    Knowledge:
    37. Students know:
    • A complete simple sentence includes a subject and a predicate and expresses a complete thought.
    • A complete compound sentence includes two subjects and two predicates and expresses two complete thoughts.
    • A complete compound sentence must include a coordinating conjunction to link the two complete thoughts.
    • A complex sentence expresses two thoughts, one complete thought and one incomplete thought, that are joined by a subordinating conjunction or relative pronoun.
    • A subject and its verb must both be singular or both plural.
    37a.
    • A sentence fragment is an incomplete sentence that is missing either its subject or its main verb.
    • A run-on sentence occurs when multiple complete sentences are joined incorrectly or
    37b.
    • A complete sentence has at least one subject and one predicate.
    • A subject is who or what the sentence is about, while the predicate describes the action of the subject.
    Skills:
    37. Students are able to:
    • Write simple sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
    • Write compound sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
    • Write complex sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
    37a.
    • Identify sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
    • Correct sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
    37b.
    • Correctly identify the subject and predicate in a sentence.
    Understanding:
    37. Students understand that:
    • There are different types of sentences, and writers vary the types of sentences they use to create variety in their writing.
    • In all sentences, the subject must agree with the verb: singular subjects use singular verbs and plural subjects use plural verbs.
    37a.
    • Sentence fragments and run-on sentences should not be included in academic writing, and they must be corrected when the occur.
    37b.
    • Every complete sentence contains two parts: a subject and a predicate.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    38. Compose and develop a well-organized paragraph with a topic sentence, details to support, and a concluding sentence.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    38.
    • Compose
    • Develop
    • Well-organized paragraph
    • Topic sentence
    • Details
    • Concluding sentence
    Knowledge:
    38. Students know:
    • A well-organized paragraph has a topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence.
    Skills:
    38. Students are able to:
    • Write a well-organized paragraph that consists of a topic sentence, supporting details, and a concluding sentence.
    Understanding:
    38. Students understand that:
    • A well-written paragraph includes a topic sentence to introduce the topic, provides supporting details to explain the topic, and ends with a concluding sentence.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 8
    Lesson Plans: 1
    Classroom Resources: 7
    39. Gather and evaluate information about a topic from a variety of sources, including digital sources, and utilize it to create a project, report, or presentation.

    a. Avoid plagiarism by using their own words and utilizing digital sources ethically.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    39.
    • Gather
    • Evaluate
    • Information
    • Topic
    • Sources
    • Digital sources
    • Utilize
    • Project
    • Report
    • Presentation
    39a.
    • Avoid
    • Plagiarism
    • Utilize
    • Digital sources
    • Ethically
    Knowledge:
    39. Students know:
    • Information can be gathered from print or digital sources.
    • Strategies to gather and evaluate information.
    • Relevant information about a topic should be added to a project, report, or presentation.
    39a.
    • Plagiarism is presenting someone else's words or ideas as their own without crediting the source.
    Skills:
    39. Students are able to:
    • Gather information about a topic from a variety of print and digital sources.
    • Evaluate the relevance of the information to the topic.
    • Use information to create a project, report, or presentation.
    39a.
    • Use their own ideas and words in writing and/or presenting information.
    • Behave ethically when using digital sources by appropriately crediting original creators.
    Understanding:
    39. Students understand that:
    • The first step in creating a project, report, or presentation is gathering and evaluating information from a variety of sources.
    39a.
    • Plagiarism is using someone else's ideas and/or words without giving credit, and it should be avoided both in written and digital work.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    40. Use grade-level and domain-appropriate vocabulary in writing.

    a. Use specific vocabulary to develop a story.

    b. Use specific vocabulary to explain or inform on a topic.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    40.
    • Grade-level vocabulary
    • Domain-appropriate vocabulary
    40a.
    • Specific vocabulary
    • Develop
    • Story
    40b.
    • Specific vocabulary
    • Explain
    • Inform
    • Topic
    Knowledge:
    40. Students know:
    • Domain-appropriate vocabulary refers to words that are specifically used within a topic of study.
    • Writers use domain-appropriate vocabulary words to clearly express their meaning and enhance details.
    40a.
    • Writers select specific vocabulary words to develop a story.
    40b.
    • Writers select specific vocabulary related to a topic to explain details or provide information.
    Skills:
    40. Students are able to:
    • Use grade-level and domain-appropriate vocabulary in their writing.
    40a.
    • Use specific vocabulary words while developing a story.
    40b.
    • Use specific vocabulary to explain or inform information on a topic.
    Understanding:
    40. Students understand that:
    • Using grade-level and domain-appropriate vocabulary will enhance their writing and help them clearly express their ideas.
    40a.
    • Writers use specific vocabulary to develop a story for a variety of audiences, tasks, and purposes.
    40b.
    • Vocabulary related to topic can help provide detailed explanations or information.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 0
    41. Use words and phrases in writing for effect and elaboration.

    a. Use transition words and phrases for sentence variety.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    41.
    • Phrases
    • Effect
    • Elaboration
    41a.
    • Transition words
    • Transition phrases
    Knowledge:
    41. Students know:
    • Using particular words and phrases in writing, like unique verbs and adjectives, can create an effect for readers.
    • Particular words and phrase can be used to elaborate, or provide more details, about a topic.
    41a.
    • Transition words and phrases help link together ideas within paragraphs and longer texts.
    Skills:
    41. Students are able to:
    • Use words and phrases in writing for effect and elaboration.
    41a.
    • Write a variety of sentences that use transition words phrases.
    Understanding:
    41. Students understand that:
    • Writers carefully choose words to use in writing to elaborate on details and create an effect for readers.
    41a.
    • Transition words and phrases are used in text to provide sentence variety.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 3
    All Resources: 1
    Classroom Resources: 1
    42. Write poetry or prose in response to visual images to interpret their meanings.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Writing
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    42.
    • Poetry
    • Prose
    • Visual images
    • Interpret
    Knowledge:
    42. Students know:
    • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings, while prose is written in ordinary language.
    • Writing can be created in response to visual images.
    • Visual images carry meaning to viewers.
    Skills:
    42. Students are able to:
    • Write poetry or prose after viewing visual images to explain their meaning.
    Understanding:
    42. Students understand that:
    • Visual images can inspire them to write poetry or prose to describe their feelings and explain the image's meaning.