Courses of Study : English Language Arts (Grade 4)

Recurring Standards
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 15
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Classroom Resources: 8
Unit Plans: 1
R1. Utilize active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings, following agreed-upon rules for participation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R1.
  • Active listening
  • Discussion
  • Conversation
  • Rules
  • Participation
Knowledge:
R1. Students know:
  • Active listening skills.
  • How to engage in discussions and conversations in a variety of settings.
  • Agreed-upon rules for participation.
Skills:
R1. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings.
  • Converse in pairs, small groups, and large groups.
  • Practice the agreed-upon rules for participation.
Understanding:
R1. Students understand that:
  • Conversations and discussions follow agreed-upon rules which help us actively listen and gain understanding.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
R2. Use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar spoken or written words.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R2.
  • Context clues
  • Determine
  • Unfamiliar spoken words
  • Unfamiliar written words
Knowledge:
R2. Students know:
  • Context clues in speech or text can provide the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • There are different types of context clues, including: inference/general clues, definition/explanation clues, restatement/synonym clues, and contrast/antonym clues.
  • Context clues in text are often indicated by punctuation marks.
Skills:
R2. Students are able to:
  • Use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words in speech.
  • Use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words in text.
Understanding:
R2. Students understand that:
  • An author or a speaker use context clues to explain the meaning of unusual words or academic, domain-specific vocabulary.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Classroom Resources: 4
R3. Use digital and electronic tools appropriately, safely, and ethically when researching and writing, both individually and collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R3.
  • Digital tools
  • Electronic tools
  • Appropriately
  • Safely
  • Ethically
  • Research
  • Individually
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
R3. Students know:
  • Digital and electronic tools must be used appropriately, safely, and ethically.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be used for research or for writing tasks.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be independently or with others.
Skills:
R3. Students are able to:
  • Engage in safe and ethical behavior when using digital and electronic tools individually and collaboratively.
Understanding:
R3. Students understand that:
  • Safe behaviors, interactions that keep you out of harm's way, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
  • Ethical behavior, interactions that align to one's moral code, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 10
Classroom Resources: 10
R4. Utilize a writing process to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writings in various genres.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R4.
  • Writing process
  • Plan
  • Draft
  • Revise
  • Edit
  • Publish
  • Genres
Knowledge:
R4. Students know:
  • The writing process steps are to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish.
  • Various genres of writing.
Skills:
R4. Students are able to:
  • Plan writings in various genres.
  • Draft writings in various genres.
  • Revise writings in various genres.
  • Edit writings in various genres.
  • Publish writings in various genres.
Understanding:
R4. Students understand that:
  • The writing process is a set of steps that make writing easier.
  • There are different categories, or genres, of writing that can be used for different purposes.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 0
R5. Identify and explain literary devices in prose and poetry.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R5.
  • Identify
  • Explain
  • Literary devices
  • Prose
  • Poetry
Knowledge:
R5. Students know:
  • Literary devices are language that carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases.
  • Literary text often includes literary devices, such as personification, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, symbolism, metaphor, and simile.
  • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings, while prose is written in ordinary language.
Skills:
R5. Students are able to:
  • Identify literary devices in prose and poetry.
  • Explain the meaning of literary devices in prose and poetry.
Understanding:
R5. Students understand that:
  • Literary devices are often included in literary text, like prose and poems.
  • An author uses literary devices to convey meaning within the text.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 0
R6. Assess the formality of occasions in order to speak or write using appropriate language and tone.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R6.
  • Assess
  • Formality
  • Occasions
  • Appropriate language
  • Appropriate tone
Knowledge:
R6. Students know:
  • Some occasions (times and places) call for formal language and tone, while other occasions permit a casual communication.
Skills:
R6. Students are able to:
  • Assess the formality of occasions.
  • In formal occasions, speak and write with a formal language and tone.
  • In informal occasions, speak and write with a casual language and tone.
Understanding:
R6. Students understand that:
  • Different situations require different types of languages and tones.
Literacy Foundations
Phonics
Reception
Reading
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
1. Apply knowledge of grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences, syllable types, and morphological structure to read unfamiliar multisyllabic words accurately, both in context and in isolation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
1.
  • Apply
  • Grade-appropriate phoneme-grapheme correspondences
  • Syllable types
  • Morphological structure
  • Multisyllabic
  • In context
  • In isolation
Knowledge:
1. Students know:
  • Printed words can be read by saying the sound (phoneme) that is represented by the letter symbols (graphemes).
  • There are six main syllable types that can be used to easily decode multisyllabic words.
  • Morphological structure refers to the meaningful units of a word that are combined to make the whole word.
  • In isolation means reading a single word, while in context refers to reading skills within a larger text.
    Skills:
    1. Students are able to:
    • Read unfamiliar multisyllabic words accurately in context and in isolation, using knowledge of phoneme-grapheme correspondences, syllable patterns, and the word's morphological structure.
    Understanding:
    1. Students understand that:
    • Multisyllabic words can be read using a variety of strategies.
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 4
    All Resources: 0
    2. Determine and use the correct syllable type(s) to decode unfamiliar multisyllabic words, including open, closed, vowel-consonant-e, r-controlled, vowel team (including diphthongs), consonant-le, and "leftovers" including odd and schwa syllables.

    Examples: dam-age, ac-tive, na-tion
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Phonics
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    2.
    • Determine
    • Decode
    • Multisyllabic words
    • Syllable types
    • Open syllable
    • Closed syllable
    • Vowel-consonant-e syllable
    • r-controlled syllable
    • Vowel team syllable
    • Diphthongs
    • Consonant-le syllable
    • Odd syllable
    • Schwa syllable
    Knowledge:
    2.
    • Syllable types are patterns of phoneme-grapheme correspondences that help divide words into parts with one vowel sound which can be easily decoded.
    Skills:
    2.
    • Decode words with more than one syllable using their knowledge of common syllable types: open, closed, vowel-consonant-e, r-controlled, vowel teams, consonant-le, odd, and schwa.
    Understanding:
    2.
    • They can decode (read) multisyllabic words by dividing the words into syllables and applying their knowledge of syllable patterns.
    Writing
    English Language Arts (2021)
    Grade(s): 4
    All Resources: 2
    Classroom Resources: 2
    3. Apply knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes to decode unfamiliar multisyllabic words.
    Unpacked Content
    Content Area:
    Literacy Foundations
    Focus Area:
    Phonics
    Teacher Vocabulary:
    3.
    • Roots
    • Suffixes
    • Prefixes
    • Decode
    • Multisyllabic words
    Knowledge:
    3. Students know:
    • Prefixes are word parts that can be added to the beginning of a word.
    • Suffixes are word parts that can be added at the end of a word.
    • The root word is the base word in which a prefix or suffix can be added.
      Skills:
      3. Students are able to:
      • Decode (read) multisyllabic words using their knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes.
      Understanding:
      3. Students understand that:
      • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them read most multisyllabic words if they divide them apart into smaller units.
      Expression
      Writing
      English Language Arts (2021)
      Grade(s): 4
      All Resources: 4
      Learning Activities: 1
      Lesson Plans: 1
      Classroom Resources: 2
      4. Apply knowledge of roots, prefixes, and suffixes to encode unfamiliar multisyllabic words.
      Unpacked Content
      Content Area:
      Literacy Foundations
      Focus Area:
      Phonics
      Teacher Vocabulary:
      4.
      • Roots
      • Suffixes
      • Prefixes
      • Encode
      • Multisyllabic words
      Knowledge:
      4. Students know:
      • Prefixes are word parts that can be added to the beginning of a word.
      • Suffixes are word parts that can be added at the end of a word.
      • The root word is the base word in which a prefix or suffix can be added.
        Skills:
        4. Students are able to:
        • Encode (write/spell) multisyllabic words using their knowledge of root words, prefixes and suffixes.
        Understanding:
        4. Students understand that:
        • Their knowledge of the different word parts (prefixes, suffixes, and roots) can help them spell most multisyllabic words if they divide them apart into smaller units.
        Fluency
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 20
        Lesson Plans: 1
        Classroom Resources: 19
        5. Demonstrate fluency when reading grade-level text and when responding through writing or speaking.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Fluency
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        5.
        • Demonstrate
        • Fluency
        • Reading
        • Responding
        • Writing
        • Speaking
        Knowledge:
        5. Students know:
        • Fluency is the ability to read, write, or speak at a pace that does not negatively impact meaning or understanding.
        Skills:
        5. Students are able to:
        • Read grade-level text fluently.
        • Demonstrate fluency when writing.
        • Demonstrate fluent speech.
        Understanding:
        5. Students understand that:
        • The ability to read fluently supports comprehension, or understanding, of the text.
        • The ability to write and speak fluently helps clearly communicate with others.
        Reception
        Reading
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        6. Read grade-level text orally with appropriate pauses, phrasing, stress, intonation, rate, and integration to support comprehension.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Fluency
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        6.
        • Pauses
        • Intonation
        • Integration
        • Stress
        • Phrasing
        • Rate
        • Comprehension
        Knowledge:
        6. Students know:
        • Fluent readers include pauses at appropriate times, link spoken words together in phrases, stress the correct syllables and words in sentences, and use changes in voice tone to convey meaning.
        • Oral reading must occur at a rate (speed) to integrate meaning and support comprehension.
        Skills:
        6. Students are able to:
        • Demonstrate oral reading with appropriate pauses, phrasing, stress, and intonation.
        • Orally read at a rate that supports comprehension.
        Understanding:
        6. Students understand that:
        • To comprehend text that they read aloud, they must read at an appropriate speed, and include pauses, phrasing, stress, and intonation as indicated by the text.
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        7. Read words with irregular and regular spelling patterns accurately and automatically.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Fluency
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        7.
        • Irregular spelling pattern
        • Regular spelling pattern
        • Accurately
        • Automatically
        Knowledge:
        7. Students know:
        • Regular and irregular spelling patterns.
        • Accurately means reading without mistakes, and automatically means knowing the words immediately without sounding them out.
        Skills:
        7. Students are able to:
        • Read words with regular and irregular spelling patterns quickly and correctly.
        Understanding:
        7. Students understand that:
        • Knowing spelling patterns that are common in the English language will help them read words quickly and correctly.
        Expression
        Writing
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 11
        Classroom Resources: 11
        8. Write routinely and independently in response to text.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Fluency
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        8.
        • Routinely
        • Independently
        Knowledge:
        8. Student know:
        • Routinely means on a consistent basis, and independently means without help from others.
        • Writing skills.
        Skills:
        8. Students are able to:
        • Respond to text in writing on a consistent basis without support from others.
        Understanding:
        8. Students understand that:
        • To demonstrate comprehension of text, they can construct a written response.
        Vocabulary
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 10
        Lesson Plans: 1
        Classroom Resources: 9
        9. Accurately interpret general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Vocabulary
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        9.
        • Interpret
        • General academic vocabulary
        • Domain-specific vocabulary
        Knowledge:
        9. Students know:
        • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
        • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
        Skills:
        9. Students are able to:
        • Correctly identify the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases.
        Understanding:
        9. Students understand that:
        • There are multiple strategies they can use to interpret the meaning of academic and domain-specific vocabulary, including using context clues in the text, their background knowledge, the morphological structure of the word, and outside resources.
        Reception
        Reading
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 11
        Learning Activities: 3
        Classroom Resources: 8
        10. Interpret words and phrases, including figurative language, as they are used in a text.

        a. Explain how specific word choices shape meaning or tone.

        b. Explain how figurative language contributes to the meaning of text, including simile, metaphor, alliteration, personification, hyperbole, and idioms.

        c. Use the relationships between synonyms, antonyms, and homographs to increase understanding of word meanings.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Vocabulary
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        10.
        • Interpret
        • Figurative language
        10a.
        • Word choice
        • Meaning
        • Tone
        10b.
        • Figurative language
        • Simile
        • Metaphor
        • Alliteration
        • Personification
        • Hyperbole
        • Idiom
        10c.
        • Synonym
        • Antonym
        • Homograph
        Knowledge:
        10. Students know:
        • Strategies to identify word meaning in context.
        • Figurative language is a creative way to use words and phrases beyond their literal definition to explain or describe something.
        10a.
        • Words have nuanced shades of meaning.
        • Authors choose to use specific words to convey intended meaning and create tone in the text.
        10b.
        • Figurative language is a creative way to use words and phrases beyond their literal definition to explain or describe something.
        • Examples of figurative language include similes, metaphors, alliteration, personification, hyperbole, and idioms.
        10c.
        • Words with opposite meanings are antonyms, and words with similar meanings are synonyms.
        • Homographs are words that are spelled the same, but not necessarily pronounced the same and have different meanings and origins.
        Skills:
        10. Students are able to:
        • Explain the meaning of words and phrases that are specific to the text.
        10a.
        • Explain how the specific word choices of an author create meaning and indicate tone in the text.
        10b.
        • Identify examples of similes, metaphors, alliteration, personification, hyperbole, and idioms in text.
        • Explain how figurative language contributes to the meaning of the text.
        10c.
        • Use synonyms, antonyms, and homographs to interpret word meaning.
        Understanding:
        10. Students understand that:
        • Words and phrases, including figurative language, can have different meanings in different texts.
        10a.
        • Words can determine the tone of the text and contribute to text meaning.
        10b.
        • Figurative language carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases, and authors choose to include figurative language in text to enhance the text's meaning.
        10c.
        • The relationships between words can be used to increase vocabulary knowledge.
        Expression
        Writing
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        11. Use commonly misused words correctly in writing.

        Examples: accept/except; effect/affect; racket/racquet; its/it's; your/you're; our/are; quiet/quit/quite
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Vocabulary
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        11.
        • Commonly misused words
        Knowledge:
        11. Students know:
        • Words must be used correctly in writing to convey the intended message.
        Skills:
        11. Students are able to:
        • Correctly write commonly misused words, such as accept/except; effect/affect; racket/racquet; its/it's; your/you're; our/are; quiet/quit/quite.
        Understanding:
        11. Students understand that:
        • It is important to use the correct spellings and forms of words in their writing to clearly communicate their ideas.
        Speaking
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        12. Consult reference materials to find the pronunciation of unknown words and phrases.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Vocabulary
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        12.
        • Reference materials
        • Pronunciation
        Knowledge:
        12. Students know:
        • Reference materials, such as dictionaries, can be used to find the proper pronunciations of unknown words and phrases.
        Skills:
        12. Students are able to:
        • Use reference materials to identify correct pronunciations of words and phrases.
        Understanding:
        12. Students understand that:
        • They have tools to help them determine the correct pronunciation of unknown words and phrases.
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        13. Use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in presentations and discussions.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Vocabulary
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        13.
        • Academic vocabulary
        • Domain-specific vocabulary
        • Presentations
        • Discussions
        Knowledge:
        13. Students know:
        • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
        • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
        • Academic, domain-specific vocabulary should be used in school for presentations and discussions.
        Skills:
        13. Students are able to:
        • Use academic and domain-specific words in speech.
        Understanding:
        13. Students understand that:
        • It is important to use academic, domain-specific vocabulary in formal settings, like school discussions and presentations.
        Comprehension
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 18
        Lesson Plans: 2
        Classroom Resources: 16
        14. Demonstrate comprehension of literary and informational text by utilizing its content when discussing or writing in response to the text.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Comprehension
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        14.
        • Comprehension
        • Literary text
        • Informational text
        • Discussing
        • Writing
        • Response
        Knowledge:
        14. Students know:
        • Comprehension of text can be demonstrated by referring to the text in discussions or written responses.
        • Informational text is nonfiction text, and literary text is fictional.
        Skills:
        14. Students are able to:
        • Demonstrate understanding of literary and informational text by referring to the text in discussions.
        • Demonstrate understanding of literary and informational text by referring to the text in written responses.
        Understanding:
        14. Students understand that:
        • They can show that they understood literary and informational text by discussing or writing about specific content from the text.
        Reception
        Reading
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 25
        Learning Activities: 3
        Lesson Plans: 6
        Classroom Resources: 16
        15. Analyze in depth a character, setting, or event in a story or drama, drawing on specific details in the text.

        a. Identify and explain attitudes and influences of multiple characters within a text.

        b. Explain how the main character changes throughout the story, using explicit evidence from the text.

        c. Make an inference about a character's behavior, the setting, and/or specific events, using explicit details from the story.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Comprehension
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        15.
        • Analyze
        • Character
        • Setting
        • Event
        • Story
        • Drama
        • Specific details
        15a.
        • Attitude
        • Influence
        • Characters
        15b.
        • Main character
        • Explicit evidence
        15c.
        • Inference
        • Character
        • Behavior
        • Setting
        • Specific events
        • Explicit details
        Knowledge:
        15. Students know:
        • Characters are any person, animal, or figure that affect the events of the story.
        • Setting is when and where a story takes place.
        • Events are situations that are described in the story.
        • A drama is a story with dialogue that can be read by different people.
        • Details in the text provide information about the characters, setting, and events.
        15a.
        • Characters are any person, animal, or figure that affect the events of the story.
        • Characters in text are described as having certain attributes, like attitude.
        • Characters in text can be influenced by other characters or events in the text.
        15b.
        • The main character is the focus of the plot and often displays changes in attitude or beliefs during the story.
        • Explicit evidence refers to direct quotations from the text.
        15c.
        • Making an inference requires using observation and background knowledge to reach a logical conclusion.
        • Inferences can be drawn by using information from the text.
        Skills:
        15. Students are able to:
        • Use specific details from the text to explain attributes of the characters, setting, or event in a story or drama.
        15a.
        • Identify attitudes and influences of multiple characters within a text.
        • Explain the reasoning behind characters' attitudes and influences.
        15b.
        • Identify the main character in a story.
        • Use explicit evidence from text to explain how the main character changed in the story.
        15c.
        • Use explicit details from a story to support inferences about a character's behavior, the story's setting, and/or specific events.
        Understanding:
        15. Students understand that:
        • They can explain details about characters, settings, and events in a story or drama by using evidence from the text.
        15a.
        • There are influences that affect characters' behavior and attitude in a text.
        15b.
        • A story usually focuses on one main character who changes throughout the text.
        • Their explanations can be supported with direct quotations from the text.
        15c.
        • Making an inference requires them to use information from the text and their background knowledge to draw conclusions about characters, settings, and events in a story.
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 0
        16. Describe how authors use literary devices and text features to convey meaning in prose, poetry, and drama.

        a. Identify clues in the text to recognize implicit meanings.

        b. Apply prior knowledge to textual clues to draw conclusions about the author's meaning.

        c. Make an inference about the meaning of a text and support it with textual evidence.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Comprehension
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        16.
        • Literary devices
        • Text features
        • Prose
        • Poetry
        • Drama
        16a.
        • Clues
        • Implicit meanings
        16b.
        • Prior knowledge
        • Textual clues
        • Draw conclusions
        16c.
        • Inference
        • Textual evidence
        Knowledge:
        16. Students know:
        • Literary devices are language that carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases.
        • Text features are items other than the main text that provide additional or clarifying information about details in a text.
        • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings, while prose is written in ordinary language.
        • A drama is a story with dialogue that can be read by different people.
        16a.
        • An implicit meaning is not directly stated in the text, it is implied or suggested.
        • Authors often provide clues about their intended implicit meaning of the text.
        16b.
        • A reader's background knowledge can be used to draw conclusions about the meaning of the text.
        16c.
        • Making an inference requires using observation and background knowledge to reach a logical conclusion.
        • Inferences can be drawn by using information from the text.
        Skills:
        16. Students are able to:
        • Describe how literary devices and text features convey meaning in prose, poetry, and drama.
        16a.
        • Identify text clues that could be used to determine the implicit meaning of the text.
        16b.
        • Use their prior knowledge and text clues to draw conclusions about an author's meaning.
        16c.
        • Make inferences about text meaning and use text evidence to support their thinking.
        Understanding:
        16. Students understand that:
        • Authors use literary devices and text features to further explain and enhance specific details in prose, poetry, and drama.
        16a.
        • Sometimes authors will not state their intended message in the text, so they must use clues to draw a conclusion about the implicit meaning of the text.
        16b.
        • Their background knowledge can be combined with clues from the text to make inferences about the author's intended meaning.
        16c.
        • Making an inference requires them to use information from the text and their background knowledge to draw logical conclusions, that are supported with evidence from the text.
        English Language Arts (2021)
        Grade(s): 4
        All Resources: 3
        Lesson Plans: 2
        Classroom Resources: 1
        17. Identify the narrator's point of view in a literary text and explain how it differs from a character's perspective.

        a. Explain the difference between first person and third person narration, including omniscient and third person limited.

        b. State an opinion of the author's use of narration, supporting reasoning with examples from the text.
        Unpacked Content
        Content Area:
        Literacy Foundations
        Focus Area:
        Comprehension
        Teacher Vocabulary:
        17.
        • Narrator
        • Point of view
        • Literary text
        • Perspective
        17a.
        • First person narration
        • Third person narration
        • Third person limited
        • Omniscient
        17b..
        • Opinion
        • Narration
        • Reasoning
          Knowledge:
          17. Students know:
          • A narrator is the speaker who is telling the story.
          • Different characters in a story can have different perspectives, or viewpoints.
          17a.
          • The features of different narration styles, including first person, third person omniscient, and third person limited.
          • Pronouns used by the author can indicate the narrator's point of view.
          17b..
          • An author chooses a narration style for a particular purpose and to convey specific meaning.
            Skills:
            17. Students are able to:
            • Identify the narrator's point of view in a literary text.
            • Explain how the narrator's point of view is different from a character's perspective.
            17a.
            • Explain how first person, third person, omniscient and third person limited narration styles differ in literary texts.
            17b..
            • Identify the author's use of narration.
            • Form and state a personal opinion about the author's use of narration.
            • Support their opinion with evidence from the text.
              Understanding:
              17. Students understand that:
              • Narrators and characters can have different points of view and perspectives within the same story.
              17a.
              • In first person narration the narrator is a character in the story and is telling the story from their perspective. The pronouns I, me, we, or us are often used.
              • In third person narration, the narrator is not part of the story and the characters never acknowledge the narrator's presence. The pronouns he, she, it, or they are often used.
              • Third person narration can be limited or omniscient.
              • An third person omniscient narrator is all-seeing and all-knowing and can tell the story from multiple characters' perspectives, while a third person limited narrator tells the story from only one character's perspective.
              17b..
              • Although an authors chose to use a specific style of narration, that does not mean it was the best or only choice.
              • They can form opinions about authors' literary choices and provide examples from the text to support their opinion.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 5
              Lesson Plans: 1
              Classroom Resources: 4
              18. Identify the point of view in a narrative and describe how the narrative would be different if told from the perspective of a different character or narrator.

              a. Compare and contrast firsthand and secondhand accounts of the same event or topic, describing the differences in focus and the information provided.

              b. Compare the perspectives of different characters within a text.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              18.
              • Point of view
              • Narrative
              • Narrator
              • Character
              18a.
              • Compare
              • Contrast
              • Firsthand accounts
              • Secondhand accounts
              • Event
              • Topic
              • Focus
              18b.
              • Perspective
              Knowledge:
              18. Students know:
              • A narrative is a story that is told either by a narrator or a character in the story.
              18a.
              • Compare means tell how things are alike or similar, and contrast means tell how things are different.
              • A firsthand account can be told by someone who was personally present at the event or has personal experience with the topic.
              • A secondhand account can be told by someone who received information about an event or topic from someone with firsthand experience.
              18b.
              • Characters in a text will have different perspectives, views, and opinions.
              Skills:
              18. Students are able to:
              • Identify the point of view in a narrative.
              • Describe how a narrative would be different if told from the perspective of a different character or narrator.
              18a.
              • Compare and contrast firsthand and secondhand accounts of the same event or topic.
              • Describe the differences in focus and the information provided in firsthand and secondhand accounts.
              18b.
              • Compare the perspectives of different characters within a text.
              Understanding:
              18. Students understand that:
              • Narratives can be told from different points of view that offer different perspectives.
              • A story will change if it is told by a different character or narrator.
              18a.
              • Information a reader gets in a text is impacted by the source of the information.
              18b.
              • The perspective of characters in a text are often different.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 13
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 2
              Classroom Resources: 10
              19. Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.

              a. Determine and state an implied theme, explicit theme, or life lesson from a myth, story, or other traditional literature.

              b. Analyze a common or shared theme and its development in stories, myths, and/or other traditional literature.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              19.
              • Compare
              • Contrast
              • Treatment
              • Theme
              • Stories
              • Myths
              • Traditional literature
              • Cultures
              19a.
              • Implied theme
              • Explicit theme
              • Life lesson
              • Myth
              • Story
              • Traditional literature
              19b.
              • Analyze
              • Theme
              • Myth
              • Traditional literature
              Knowledge:
              19. Students know:
              • Compare means tell how things are alike or similar, and contrast means tell how things are different.
              • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text, and there are common themes in literary text.
              • A myth is a type of traditional literature, that often explains the early history of a people or some natural or social phenomenon, that typically involves supernatural beings or events.
              • Culture is the customs or institutions of a particular nation, people, or another social group.
              19a.
              • An implied theme is not directly stated in the text, while an explicit theme is directly stated in the text.
              • Myths, stories, and other types of traditional literature were often written with the purpose of teaching a life lesson.
              19b.
              • An author develops a theme by including specific details in the text to help the reader identify and understand the theme.
              • There are common, or universal, themes that frequently appear in literary text.
              Skills:
              19. Students are able to:
              • Identify the theme in stories, myths, and traditional literature from different cultures.
              • Compare and contrast the treatment of similar themes in literature from different cultures.
              19a.
              • Identify an implied theme, explicit theme, or life lesson from a myth, story, or another type of traditional literature.
              • State the implied theme, explicit theme, or life lesson from a myth, story, or another type of traditional literature.
              19b.
              • Identify the common theme in various types of traditional literature.
              • Analyze how the author developed the theme throughout the literature.
              Understanding:
              19. Students understand that:
              • Literature often includes universal (common) themes than can help the reader better understand other perspectives and cultures.
              19a.
              • Sometimes an author will state the theme or life lesson in the text, while other times the reader must use clues and details from the text to infer the theme or lesson.
              • Myths and traditional literature were often written with the purpose of teaching life lessons.
              19b.
              • Literature often includes universal (common) themes, and the author suggests the theme of the text by including particular details about characters or events.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 18
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 8
              Classroom Resources: 9
              20. Use details and examples from a text to indicate what the text explicitly states.

              a. Interpret facts from an informational article, using details and examples from the text to explain the interpretation.

              b. List the main questions answered by an informational article.

              c. Categorize statements in an article or other informational text as fact or opinion and give reasons for each choice.

              d. Explain the differences between primary and secondary sources, giving examples from texts.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              20.
              • Details
              • Examples
              • Explicitly
              20a.
              • Interpret
              • Facts
              • Details
              • Examples
              • Informational article
              20b.
              • List
              • Main questions
              • Informational article
              20c.
              • Categorize
              • Fact
              • Opinion
              • Reasons
              20d.
              • Primary sources
              • Secondary source
              Knowledge:
              20. Students know:
              • Explicit means directly stated within the text.
              • Specific details and examples from the text an be used to demonstrate an understanding of the text's explicit meaning.
              20a.
              • Facts gathered from an informational article can be explained using details and examples from the text.
              20b.
              • Informational text is often written with the purpose of answering questions.
              20c.
              • A fact is a statement that can be proven with evidence, while an opinion is a personal belief that cannot be proven true in every case.
              • Informational text can present both facts and opinions.
              20d.
              • Primary sources are firsthand accounts of events and provide raw information.
              • Secondary sources explain, analyze, or summarize primary sources.
              Skills:
              20. Students are able to:
              • Identify details and examples from a text that demonstrates comprehension of the text's explicit meaning.
              20a.
              • Explain facts sourced from an informational text, using text evidence to support the explanation.
              20b.
              • Identify the main questions answered by an informational text.
              20c.
              • Determine if statements in an informational text are facts or opinions.
              • Describe reasons that a particular statement is identified as a fact or an opinion.
              20d.
              • Explain the differences between primary and secondary sources.
              • Support their explanation with specific examples from the text.
              Understanding:
              20. Students understand that:
              • Explicit meanings are directly stated in text, and they can use specific details and examples from the text to show they understood the text's explicit meaning.
              20a.
              • To demonstrate comprehension of an informational article, they can explain the facts using specific details and examples from the text.
              20b.
              • Informational articles often answer questions and identifying these questions can improve comprehension.
              20c.
              • A fact is a thing that is known or proved to be true, and an opinion is a personal view or judgment about something.
              • To fully comprehend a text, they must distinguish between facts and opinions.
              • They can determine if a statement is a fact or an opinion using their current knowledge or by referencing details in a text.
              20d.
              • The information a reader gets from a text is impacted by the source of the information.
              • Primary and secondary sources will be told from different perspectives.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 12
              Lesson Plans: 3
              Classroom Resources: 9
              21. Explain how relevant details support the implied or explicit main idea of a text.

              a. Determine the central idea or theme of a text.

              b. Explain the difference between implied and explicit details.

              c. Summarize the key supporting details by citing evidence from a text.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              21.
              • Implied main idea
              • Explicit main idea
              • Relevant details
              21a.
              • Central idea
              • Theme
              21b.
              • Implied detail
              • Explicit detail
              21c.
              • Summarize
              • Key supporting details
              • Citing
              • Evidence
              Knowledge:
              21. Students know:
              • The main idea is the most important idea presented in the text.
              • Sometimes an author will clearly state the main idea, while other times an author will merely suggest the main idea.
              • The supporting details explain the main idea or provide more information about the main idea.
              21a.
              • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text.
              21b.
              • An author can directly state details, or an author can include details that require the reader to make inferences.
              21c.
              • A summary is a short statement explaining the main point or most important details of a text.
              Skills:
              21. Students are able to:
              • Identify the implied or explicit main idea of a text.
              • Use relevant details to support the main idea of a text.
              21a.
              • Determine the central idea or theme of a text.
              21b.
              • Identify implied and explicit details and explain how they are different.
              21c.
              • Cite evidence from the text to create a summary of a text's most important details.
              Understanding:
              21. Students understand that:
              • Most texts have a main idea, or most important message, and supporting details, which provide more information about the main idea.
              • An author can choose to state the main idea in the text or provide clues through details in the text to imply the main idea.
              21a.
              • The central idea or theme of a text is conveyed through details in the text.
              21b.
              • An author can choose to explicitly state details in the text or provide details that require the reader to infer the details.
              21c.
              • A summary is a short explanation of the most important details from a text, and statements in a summary should be supported with textual evidence.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 20
              Lesson Plans: 12
              Classroom Resources: 8
              22. Analyze events, procedures, ideas, or concepts in informational texts, including what happened and why, based on specific information in the text.

              a. Cite evidence to explain the author's perspective toward a topic in an informational text.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              22.
              • Analyze
              • Events
              • Procedures
              • Ideas
              • Concepts
              • Informational texts
              22a.
              • Cite
              • Evidence
              • Author's perspective
              • Topic
              • Informational text
              Knowledge:
              22. Students know:
              • Informational text often describes events, procedures, ideas, or concepts.
              22a.
              • Authors of informational text have personal perspectives or viewpoints that are reflected in their writing.
              Skills:
              22. Students are able to:
              • Use specific information in informational text to describe events, procedures, ideas, or concepts.
              • Explain the causes and effects of the events described in text.
              22a.
              • Identify and explain an author's perspective toward a topic in informational text.
              • Provide textual evidence to support their explanation of the author's perspective.
              Understanding:
              22. Students understand that:
              • They can use information from the text to examine and interpret events, procedures, ideas, or concepts from informational texts.
              • Some informational text will explain the causes and effects of certain events.
              22a.
              • Authors of informational text have views and opinions about the topics they write about, and their perspectives will be reflected within the text.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 8
              Learning Activities: 2
              Lesson Plans: 2
              Classroom Resources: 3
              Unit Plans: 1
              23. Evaluate how text features and structures contribute to the meaning of an informational text.

              a. Identify and describe the structures within a text, including description, comparison and contrast, sequence, problem and solution, and cause and effect.

              b. Interpret information from text features in both print and digital formats.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              23.
              • Text features
              • Text structures
              • Informational texts
              23a.
              • Description
              • Comparison and contrast
              • Sequence
              • Problem and solution
              • Cause and effect
              23b.
              • Text features
              • Print format
              • Digital format
              Knowledge:
              23. Students know:
              • Informational text often includes text features, such as graphs, charts, diagrams, photographs, etc., to help readers better understand the information in the text.
              • Informational text often follows a predictable text structure.
              23a.
              • Informational text often follows a particular text structure and understanding the types of text structure can help improve comprehension.
              • A text that follows a description structure will provide facts and details about a topic.
              • A text that follows a comparison and contrast structure will describe how two or more things are alike or different.
              • A text that follows a sequence text structure will describe events that occurred in chronological order.
              • Problem and solution text structure describes a problem and how the problem was solved or could be solved.
              • Cause and effect text structure describes an event (the cause) and the consequence or result of the event (the effect).
              23b.
              • Text features are items like charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages.
              • Text features can provide additional information or enhance understanding of the text.
              Skills:
              23. Students are able to:
              • Identify and describe how text features contribute to the meaning of informational text.
              • Identify and describe how text structure contributes to the meaning of informational text.
              23a.
              • Identify the type of text structure a text follows.
              • Describe characteristics of the text structure.
              23b.
              • Identify text features in print and digital formats.
              • Explain the meaning of text features in print and digital formats.
              Understanding:
              23. Students understand that:
              • Text features are often included in informational text to help readers better understand the author's intended meaning and message.
              • Informational texts often follow a predictable text structure, and identifying the structure of a text can improve comprehension.
              23a.
              • Texts follow a predictable structure that contributes to the overall meaning of the text.
              23b.
              • Text features can be found in printed and digital text materials.
              • Text features often provide important information about details in the text or can enhance understanding of details in the text.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 6
              Lesson Plans: 1
              Classroom Resources: 5
              24. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points and claims in an informational text or argument.

              a. Make text-based inferences to determine possible reasons for an author's stance.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              24.
              • Reasons
              • Evidence
              • Points
              • Claims
              • Informational text
              • Argument
              24a.
              • Text-based inference
              • Stance
              Knowledge:
              24. Students know:
              • Authors of informational texts or argumentative writings often include logical reasons and evidence to support their points or claims.
              24a.
              • A text-based inference is a logical conclusion that is drawn from details in the text.
              • Authors often take a particular stance, or attitude, towards the topic of their writing.
              Skills:
              24. Students are able to:
              • Identify key points and claims in an informational text or argument.
              • Identify reasons and text evidence that supports the points or claims of an author.
              • Explain how the author used reasons and evidence to support their key points and claims.
              24a.
              • Make inferences about an author's stance using evidence from the text.
              Understanding:
              24. Students understand that:
              • Authors use logical reasoning and factual evidence to support their points and claims within informational texts or arguments.
              24a.
              • Authors will often have a particular attitude towards the topic of their writing, and readers can determine an author's stance by using text evidence to draw conclusions.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              25. Explain how the form of a poem contributes to its meaning.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              25.
              • Poem
              • Form
              Knowledge:
              25. Students know:
              • Poetry can be written in different formats.
              Skills:
              25. Students are able to:
              • Identify the form of a poem.
              • Describe how a poem's form helps convey its meaning.
              Understanding:
              25. Students understand that:
              • Poems have varying forms that can be used to convey different meanings.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              26. Analyze how rhythm and rhyme in poetry contribute to meaning.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              26.
              • Rhythm
              • Rhyme
              Knowledge:
              26. Students know:
              • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings.
              • Words rhyme if their vowel and ending sounds are the same.
              • Rhythm is a steady beat made by stressed syllables in spoken words.
              Skills:
              26. Students are able to:
              • Identify rhythm and rhyme in poetry.
              • Describe how rhythm and rhyme convey meaning in a poem.
              Understanding:
              26. Students understand that:
              • Authors of poetry select particular rhyme and rhythm schemes to convey meaning.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 1
              Lesson Plans: 1
              27. Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker provides to support particular points.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              27.
              • Reasons
              • Speaker
              • Evidence
              • Points
              Knowledge:
              27. Students know:
              • Active listening skills.
              • Just like in written language, a speaker will often provide reasons and evidence to support their key points.
              Skills:
              27. Students are able to:
              • Identify a speaker's main points.
              • Identify the reasons and evidence a speaker uses to support their main points.
              Understanding:
              27. Students understand that:
              • Like an author of written text, speakers use reasons and evidence to support their key points.
              Expression
              Writing
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              28. Write clear and coherent responses to texts, using explicit or implicit evidence that supports a particular point.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              28.
              • Clear
              • Coherent
              • Explicit evidence
              • Implicit evidence
              Knowledge:
              28. Students know:
              • Clear and coherent writing follows a particular structure and is easily understood by readers.
              • Text-based responses should include textual evidence that is explicit (direct quotation) or implicit (summary or paraphrase).
              Skills:
              28. Students are able to:
              • Respond to texts in clear, coherent writing that using textual evidence to support their points.
              Understanding:
              28. Students understand that:
              • They can demonstrate comprehension of text by creating clear and coherent writing that utilizes textual evidence to support points.
              Speaking
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              29. Add audio recordings to presentations, when appropriate, to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              29.
              • Audio recordings
              • Presentations
              • Enhance
              • Development
              • Main ideas
              • Themes
              Knowledge:
              29. Students know:
              • Adding sound recordings to written presentations can supplement the development of main ideas or themes.
              Skills:
              29. Students are able to:
              • Create audio recordings to use with presentations to enhance the development of main ideas or theme.
              Understanding:
              29. Students understand that:
              • There are occasions when particular sounds can improve the development of main ideas or themes.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 6
              Lesson Plans: 4
              Classroom Resources: 1
              Unit Plans: 1
              30. Synthesize information on a topic in order to write or speak knowledgeably about the subject.

              a. Make complex inferences within and across texts to determine the importance of information.

              b. Use evidence to explain information across texts including different perspectives and/or points of view.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              30.
              • Synthesize
              • Topic
              • Subject
              30a.
              • Inferences
              30b.
              • Evidence
              • Perspectives
              • Points of view
              Knowledge:
              30. Students know:
              • Synthesizing information about a topic means to combine information from many different sources.
              30a.
              • A complex inference is drawing a conclusion based on available information within one text or across multiple texts.
              30b.
              • Different texts will often display different perspectives and different points of view.
              Skills:
              30. Students are able to:
              • Write or speak knowledgeable about a topic by synthesizing information from multiple sources.
              30a.
              • Determine the importance of information by making complex inferences within one text or across multiple texts.
              30b.
              • Use evidence to explain information across different texts.
              Understanding:
              30. Students understand that:
              • To become knowledgeable about a topic, they have to combine their knowledge gained from a variety of sources.
              30a.
              • Complex inferences can be used to determine the importance of information within a text or within a body of knowledge.
              30b.
              • Textual evidence must be used to explain information found in different texts.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 4
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 1
              Classroom Resources: 1
              Unit Plans: 1
              31. Orally paraphrase portions of a text or information presented in diverse media when collaborating and/or presenting.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Comprehension
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              31.
              • Orally paraphrase
              • Diverse media
              • Collaborating
              • Presenting
              Knowledge:
              31. Students know:
              • Paraphrasing means to express the same meaning of the original source, but use different words or phrases.
              Skills:
              31. Students are able to:
              • Orally paraphrase portions of text or other presented information in presentations or groups.
              Understanding:
              31. Students understand that:
              • Paraphrasing can demonstrate they understand the source information well enough to rephrase it in their own words.
              Writing
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 1
              Classroom Resources: 1
              32. Respond in writing to literature and informational text, including stories, dramas, poetry, and cross-curricular texts, both independently and with support, demonstrating grade-level proficiency.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              32.
              • Respond
              • Writing
              • Literature
              • Informational texts
              • Stories
              • Dramas
              • Poetry
              • Cross-curricular texts
              • Independently
              • With support
              • Grade-level proficiency
              Knowledge:
              32. Students know:
              • Responding to text in a written format demonstrates comprehension of the text.
              Skills:
              32. Students are able to:
              • Independently and with support, create grade-appropriate written responses after reading literature and informational text.
              Understanding:
              32. Students understand that:
              • To respond in writing to literature and informational texts, they must read critically, have a deep understanding of the text's content, and use appropriate writing skills.
              Reception
              Reading
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 15
              Lesson Plans: 5
              Classroom Resources: 10
              33. Use research to produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience.

              a. Introduce a research topic clearly and group related ideas.

              b. Integrate and cite evidence to present research findings in written form.

              c. Paraphrase portions of texts or information presented in diverse media and formats.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              33.
              • Research
              • Clear
              • Coherent
              • Development
              • Organization
              • Task
              • Purpose
              • Audience
              33a.
              • Research
              • Topic
              • Group
              • Related ideas
              33b.
              • Integrate
              • Evidence
              • Cite
              • Research
              33c.
              • Paraphrase
              • Diverse media
              Knowledge:
              33. Students know:
              • Research happens when you look up information about a topic.
              • Clear and coherent writing is organized into a text structure and develops ideas with the addition of details.
              • Writing styles can vary depending on the task, the purpose, and the intended audience.
              33a.
              • Informative writing should begin by introducing the topic of the text.
              • Writing can be organized into a structure by logically grouping ideas to support the writer's purpose.
              33b.
              • Integrate means to combine information from multiple research sources.
              33c.
              • Paraphrasing means to express the same meaning of the original source, but use different words or phrases.
              Skills:
              33. Students are able to:
              • Gather research information about a topic.
              • Create writing that is clear, coherent, and appropriate to the task, the purpose, and the audience.
              • Organize writing into a particular structure and develop ideas using details.
              33a.
              • Clearly introduce a research topic in their writing.
              • Logically group related ideas to support explanation of the topic.
              33b.
              • Integrate research findings from multiple sources in writing.
              • Cite evidence from research sources in writing.
              33c.
              • Paraphrase portions of texts or presented information in writing.
              Understanding:
              33. Students understand that:
              • Before writing an informative text, they should gather information through research.
              • There writing should always be clear and coherent, but the style may change depending on the task, purpose, and audience.
              33a.
              • Focusing on the topic of a text by providing a clear introduction and grouping related ideas draws the reader's attention to important points and supports the meaning of the text.
              33b.
              • They must combine multiple sources of information and cite the source of the information when presenting research findings in their writing.
              33c.
              • Paraphrasing can demonstrate they understand the source information well enough to write it in their own words.
              Expression
              Writing
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              34. Write fluently and legibly in cursive, using correctly formed letters with appropriate spacing.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              34.
              • Fluently
              • Legibly
              • Cursive
              • Correctly formed letters
              • Appropriate spacing
              Knowledge:
              34. Students know:
              • Legible writing can be read by others.
              • Fluent writing is writing at a consistent pace.
              • Cursive writing strokes for all letters.
              • Cursive writing connects the letters within words.
              • Appropriate spacing should occur between words.
              Skills:
              34. Students are able to:
              • Write legibly in cursive at a steady pace.
              • Connect and correctly form cursive letters.
              • Include appropriate spacing between words.
              Understanding:
              34. Students understand that:
              • Cursive writing is a special type of writing that connects letters within words.
              • Appropriate spacing is important so that readers can tell where one cursive word ends and the next begins.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 25
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 5
              Classroom Resources: 19
              35. Write personal or fictional narratives using a logical plot, transitional words and phrases, sensory details, and dialogue, and providing a sense of closure.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              35.
              • Personal narratives
              • Fictional narratives
              • Logical plot
              • Transitional words and phrases
              • Sensory details
              • Dialogue
              • Closure
              Knowledge:
              35. Students know:
              • A narrative is a piece of writing that tells a story.
              • A personal narrative tells about an event that was personally experienced by the author, while a fictional narrative tells a made up story.
              • A narrative story describes a sequence of events in a logical order (beginning, middle, end) and provides a sense of closure as an ending.
              • Narrative transitions indicate when and where the story is occurring.
              • Sensory details use descriptions of the five senses.
              • Dialogue is a conversation between two or more people.
              Skills:
              35. Students are able to:
              • Write a personal narrative that recalls a personal experience or a fictional narrative with a made-up story.
              • Write a narrative with a logical sequence of events and sensory details.
              • Use appropriate transitional words and phrases in narrative writing.
              • Include dialogue in narrative writing.
              • Write a narrative that ends with a sense of closure.
              Understanding:
              35. Students understand that:
              • Narrative writing includes predictable elements, like a logical sequence of events and an ending that provides the reader with a sense of closure.
              • Because narrative writing describes a chronological sequence of events, it includes transitions that indicate the time and place in which the story is occurring.
              • Narrative writing can be used to tell about something that happened to them personally or it can tell a story they made up.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 19
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 6
              Classroom Resources: 11
              Unit Plans: 1
              36. Write informative or explanatory text about a topic using sources, incorporating academic vocabulary, and including an introduction, facts, details with elaboration, and a conclusion.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              36.
              • Informative text
              • Explanatory text
              • Topic
              • Sources
              • Academic vocabulary
              • Introduction
              • Facts
              • Details with elaboration
              • Conclusion
              Knowledge:
              36. Students know:
              • Informative or explanatory text is a piece of writing that provides factual information that was gathered from research sources.
              • Informative or explanatory text begins by introducing the topic, provides facts and relevant details, and ends with a conclusion.
              • Elaboration means to supply additional information about a detail by using academic vocabulary or by including text features.
              • Academic vocabulary is more formal and specific than spoken language.
              Skills:
              36. Students are able to:
              • Gather information from sources.
              • Write an informative or explanatory text using information gathered from sources.
              • Write an informative or explanatory text that begins with introducing the topic, provides facts and details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
              • Elaborate on details included in the text using academic vocabulary.
              Understanding:
              36. Students understand that:
              • Informative or explanatory writing follows a predictable text structure that includes introducing the topic, providing facts or additional details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
              • They must gather their facts about the topic from a research source.
              • Writers elaborate details included in the text by using formal academic vocabulary and text features.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 5
              Learning Activities: 1
              Lesson Plans: 2
              Classroom Resources: 2
              37. Write an argument to persuade the reader to take an action or adopt a position, using an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence from relevant sources, and linking words to connect their argument to the evidence.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              37.
              • Argument
              • Persuade
              • Take an action
              • Adopt a position
              • Introduction
              • Logical reasoning
              • Evidence
              • Relevant sources
              • Linking words
              Knowledge:
              37. Students know:
              • The purpose of argumentative writing is to convince the reader to take action or adopt a particular position.
              • Argumentative writing includes an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a concluding statement.
              • Evidence to support the argument must be collected from various sources.
              • Linking words are used to connect their claim to the corresponding evidence.
              Skills:
              37. Students are able to:
              • Write an argument to convince a reader to take action or adopt a position.
              • Include an introduction, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a conclusion in argumentative writing.
              • Gather evidence from relevant sources to support a claim.
              • Use linking words to connect their argument to the corresponding evidence.
              Understanding:
              37. Students understand that:
              • To persuade a reader to take action or adopt an opinion, they must present logical reasoning supported by evidence from relevant sources.
              • Linking words can help connect their argument to the evidence supporting their argument.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 13
              Classroom Resources: 13
              38. Compose complete sentences with correct subject-verb agreement, punctuation, and usage.

              a. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns.

              Example: a small red bag rather than a red small bag

              b. Form and use prepositional phrases and conjunctions.

              c. Recognize and correct sentence fragments and run-on sentences.

              d. Use commas, apostrophes, and quotation marks correctly.

              e. Use correct capitalization, including familial relations and proper adjectives.

              f. Spell grade-appropriate words correctly, consulting references as needed.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              38.
              • Compose
              • Complete sentences
              • Subject-verb agreement
              • Punctuation
              38a.
              • Adjectives
              38b.
              • Prepositional phrases
              • Conjunctions
              38c.
              • Sentence fragments
              • Run-on sentences
              38d.
              • Commas
              • Apostrophes
              • Quotation marks
              38e.
              • Capitalization
              • Familial relations
              • Proper adjectives
              38f.
              • References
              Knowledge:
              38. Students know:
              • A complete sentence has at least one subject and one predicate.
              • A subject and its verb must both be singular or both plural.
              • A complete sentence ends with an ending punctuation mark and there are other punctuation marks that may need to be included.
              38a.
              • The English language orders adjectives within a sentence according to conventional patterns.
              38b.
              • A prepositional phrase is a group of words consisting of a preposition, the object of the preposition, and any words that modify the object.
              • A conjunction joins words, phrases, or clauses and indicates the relationship between the joined units; there are coordinating conjunctions and subordinating conjunctions.
              38c.
              • A sentence fragment is an incomplete sentence that is missing either its subject or its main verb.
              • A run-on sentence occurs when multiple complete sentences are joined incorrectly without using a coordinating conjunction or appropriate punctuation.
              38d.
              • Commas, apostrophes, and quotation marks are punctuation marks that are used in writing for specific purposes.
              38e.
              • Certain words in the English language are capitalized.
              38f.
              • Phonics skills necessary to spell words correctly.
              • Correct spellings can be located in reference materials, such as dictionaries.
              Skills:
              38. Students are able to:
              • Write complete sentences with correct subject-verb agreement and appropriate punctuation and word usage.
              38a.
              • Appropriate order adjectives within a sentence according to standard English conventions; for example, a small red bag rather than a red small bag.
              38b.
              • Form and use prepositional phrases in writing.
              • Form and use conjunctions in writing.
              38c.
              • Recognize sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
              • Correct sentence fragments and run-on sentences.
              38d.
              • Use commas, apostrophes, and quotation marks correctly in writing.
              38e.
              • Use correct capitalization, including familial relations and proper adjectives.
              38f.
              • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly.
              • Consult references for correct spellings, if needed.
              Understanding:
              38. Students understand that:
              • The proper conventions of a complete sentence must be used to convey their intended meaning.
              38a.
              • Ordering adjectives in a conventional manner helps their writing to be clearly understood by readers.
              38b.
              • Prepositional phrases and conjunctions are used to expand or connect words, phrases, and sentences.
              38c.
              • Sentence fragments and run-on sentences should not be included in academic writing, and they must be corrected when the occur.
              38d.
              • Commas are a common punctuation mark used in writing for multiple reasons, such as to separate items in a series, before a coordinating conjunction in a compound sentence, or with direct quotations.
              • Apostrophes are used to form possessive nouns and contractions.
              • Quotation marks are used to show dialogue (speech) in text.
              38e.
              • There are common capitalization rules to follow, such as capitalizing the first letter of a sentence, proper nouns, and the pronoun I.
              • There are less common capitalization rules, like capitalizing familial relations and proper adjectives.
              38f.
              • To clearly communicate in writing, they must use correct spellings.
              • If they do not know how to spell a word, they can consult reference materials for assistance.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 12
              Learning Activities: 2
              Lesson Plans: 1
              Classroom Resources: 9
              39. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage.

              a. Use relative pronouns who, whose, which, and that, relative adverbs where, when, and how, and irregular possessive nouns.

              b. Form and use the progressive verb tenses.

              Examples: I was walking, I am walking

              c. Use modal auxiliaries to convey various conditions.

              Examples: can, may, must
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              39.
              • Demonstrate
              • Command
              • Conventions
              • Standard English grammar
              • Standard English usage
              39a.
              • Relative pronouns
              • Relative adverbs
              • Irregular possessive nouns
              39b.
              • Progressive verb tenses
              39c.
              • Modal auxiliaries
              • Convey
              • Various conditions
              Knowledge:
              39. Students know:
              • Standard English grammar and usage conventions.
              39a.
              • A clause is a group of words that contains a subject and a verb that have a relationship.
              • A relative pronoun is used to connect a clause or phrase to a noun or pronoun in which the clause modifies or describes the noun.
              • A relative adverb is an adverb that introduces an adjective clause.
              • Common irregular nouns and conventions to form possessive nouns.
              39b.
              • The progressive verb tense describes ongoing actions, and it tells about something that is, was, or will be happening.
              39c.
              • Modal auxiliaries are verbs that never change forms the way most other verbs do.
              • Modal auxiliary verbs indicate possibility, capability, necessity, or willingness.
              Skills:
              39. Students are able to:
              • Demonstrate correct standard English grammar and word usage in writing.
              39a.
              • Use relative pronouns correctly in writing.
              • Use relative adverbs correctly in writing.
              • Form and use irregular possessive nouns correctly in writing.
              39b.
              • Form and use the progressive verb tenses; for example, I was walking, I am walking.
              39c.
              • Use modal auxiliaries to convey various conditions; for example, can, may, must.
              Understanding:
              39. Students understand that:
              • Demonstrating command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing is necessary to convey meaning.
              39a.
              • There are some special parts of speech that can be used to add more details to sentences, like relative pronouns and relative adverbs, that must be used correctly to clearly convey meaning.
              • There are some nouns that create their plural and possessive forms in an irregular way.
              39b.
              • The tense of a verb indicates when the action occurred.
              • To form the progressive tenses, they will use a form of the helping verb to be with a main verb ending in -ing.
              39c.
              • Modal auxiliaries are a type of helping verb that must be used together with the main verb of the sentence.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 1
              Classroom Resources: 1
              40. Compose friendly and formal letters using appropriate elements, including date, greeting, body, and a signature.

              a. Write return address and mailing address in the proper locations on an envelope.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              40.
              • Friendly letter
              • Formal letter
              • Date
              • Greeting
              • Body
              • Signature
              40a.
              • Return address
              • Mailing address
              • Envelope
              Knowledge:
              40. Students know:
              • The tone of a formal letter is professional and official, while the tone of an friendly letter is informal.
              • Both friendly and formal letters include some of the same components, including the date, greeting, body, and signature.
              40a.
              • The mailing address is written in the center of an envelope, and the return address is written in the upper-left corner of the envelope.
              Skills:
              40. Students are able to:
              • Write a friendly letter with all of the appropriate elements.
              • Write a formal letter with all of the appropriate elements.
              40a.
              • Write the return address and mailing address on an envelope in the correct place.
              Understanding:
              40. Students understand that:
              • Letters can be written for different purposes and different intended audiences, but all letters contain some required elements.
              40a.
              • A return address and mailing address must be included when mailing an envelope.
              Speaking
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 0
              41. Present an opinion orally, sequencing ideas logically and using relevant facts.

              a. Express appropriate and meaningful responses to questions posed by others.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              41.
              • Opinion
              • Sequencing
              • Logically
              • Relevant
              41a.
              • Appropriate
              • Meaningful
              • Response
              • Question
              Knowledge:
              41. Students know:
              • When presenting an opinion, ideas must be sequenced in a logical pattern and relevant facts must be included.
              41a.
              • Part of presenting information orally includes responding to listeners' questions.
              Skills:
              41. Students are able to:
              • Orally present an opinion, with ideas that are logically sequenced and facts that are relevant to the presentation.
              41a.
              • Express an appropriate and meaningful response to a question.
              Understanding:
              41. Students understand that:
              • When presenting an opinion, facts and supporting details must be logically presented to provide support for the argument.
              41a.
              • After presenting information to others, they should be prepared to respond to questions in an appropriate and meaningful way.
              English Language Arts (2021)
              Grade(s): 4
              All Resources: 9
              Learning Activities: 2
              Lesson Plans: 5
              Classroom Resources: 1
              Unit Plans: 1
              42. Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes, and speaking clearly with adequate volume, appropriate pacing, and clear pronunciation.

              a. Articulate ideas, claims, and perspectives in a logical sequence, presenting information, findings, and credible evidence from multiple sources and modalities to enhance listeners' understanding.
              Unpacked Content
              Content Area:
              Literacy Foundations
              Focus Area:
              Writing
              Teacher Vocabulary:
              42.
              • Report
              • Topic
              • Text
              • Recount
              • Appropriate facts
              • Relevant details
              • Descriptive details
              • Main ideas
              • Themes
              • Volume
              • Pacing
              • Pronunciation
              42a.
              • Articulate
              • Ideas
              • Claims
              • Perspectives
              • Logical sequence
              • Information
              • Findings
              • Credible evidence
              • Sources
              • Modalities
              Knowledge:
              42. Students know:
              • One way to share information is through oral presentations.
              • Oral presentations should be organized, have a main idea or theme, and include relevant, descriptive details and facts that support the key point.
              • Speakers should orally present in a volume loud enough for the audience to hear, at an understable pace, and with correct speech pronunciation.
              42a.
              • A speaker can enhance the audience's understanding by explaining ideas, claims, and perspectives in a logical sequence, and by providing additional information in the form of credible evidence from multiple sources.
              Skills:
              42. Students are able to:
              • Orally report in response to a topic or text, to tell a story, or to describe a personal experience.
              • Create an oral report that is organized, and includes relevant, descriptive facts and details that support the main idea or theme.
              • Speak at an adequate volume and appropriate pace and use proper pronunciation when presenting an oral report.
              42a.
              • Orally articulate ideas, claims, and perspectives in a logical sequence.
              • Gather information, findings, and credible evidence from multiple sources and modalities.
              • Orally present information, findings, and credible evidence.
              Understanding:
              42. Students understand that:
              • An effective oral presentation requires an organized structure and uses relevant facts and details to support the key idea.
              • An effective speaker presents with a voice that can be heard by the audience, a speaking pace that can be understood by the audience, and proper pronunciation of words.
              42a.
              • Information, findings, and credible evidence should be gathered from multiple sources in varied modalities to enhance the audience's understanding of the oral presentation.
              • To clearly articulate their ideas, claims, and perspectives, they must organize their thoughts in a logical sequence.