Courses of Study : English Language Arts (Grade 5)

Recurring Standards
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 15
Learning Activities: 2
Classroom Resources: 13
R1. Utilize active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings, following agreed-upon rules for participation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R1.
  • Active listening
  • Discussion
  • Conversation
  • Rules
  • Participation
Knowledge:
R1. Students know:
  • Active listening skills.
  • How to engage in discussions and conversations in a variety of settings.
  • Agreed-upon rules for participation.
Skills:
R1. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate active listening skills during discussion and conversation in pairs, small groups, or whole-class settings.
  • Converse in pairs, small groups, and large groups.
  • Practice the agreed-upon rules for participation.
Understanding:
R1. Students understand that:
  • Conversations and discussions follow agreed-upon rules which help us actively listen and gain understanding.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 7
Classroom Resources: 7
R2. Use context clues to determine meanings of unfamiliar spoken or written words.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R2.
  • Context clues
  • Determine
  • Unfamiliar spoken words
  • Unfamiliar written words
Knowledge:
R2. Students know:
  • Context clues in speech or text can provide the meaning of unfamiliar words.
  • There are different types of context clues, including: inference/general clues, definition/explanation clues, restatement/synonym clues, and contrast/antonym clues.
  • Context clues in text are often indicated by punctuation marks.
Skills:
R2. Students are able to:
  • Use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words in speech.
  • Use context clues to determine the meanings of unfamiliar words in text.
Understanding:
R2. Students understand that:
  • An author or a speaker use context clues to explain the meaning of unusual words or academic, domain-specific vocabulary.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
R3. Use digital and electronic tools appropriately, safely, and ethically when researching and writing, both individually and collaboratively.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R3.
  • Digital tools
  • Electronic tools
  • Appropriately
  • Safely
  • Ethically
  • Research
  • Individually
  • Collaboratively
Knowledge:
R3. Students know:
  • Digital and electronic tools must be used appropriately, safely, and ethically.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be used for research or for writing tasks.
  • Digital and electronic tools can be independently or with others.
Skills:
R3. Students are able to:
  • Engage in safe and ethical behavior when using digital and electronic tools individually and collaboratively.
Understanding:
R3. Students understand that:
  • Safe behaviors, interactions that keep you out of harm's way, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
  • Ethical behavior, interactions that align to one's moral code, are necessary when using digital and electronic tools.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 6
R4. Utilize a writing process to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish writings in various genres.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R4.
  • Writing process
  • Plan
  • Draft
  • Revise
  • Edit
  • Publish
  • Genres
Knowledge:
R4. Students know:
  • The writing process steps are to plan, draft, revise, edit, and publish.
  • Various genres of writing.
Skills:
R4. Students are able to:
  • Plan writings in various genres.
  • Draft writings in various genres.
  • Revise writings in various genres.
  • Edit writings in various genres.
  • Publish writings in various genres.
Understanding:
R4. Students understand that:
  • The writing process is a set of steps that make writing easier.
  • There are different categories, or genres, of writing that can be used for different purposes.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
R5. Identify and explain literary devices in prose and poetry.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R5.
  • Identify
  • Explain
  • Literary devices
  • Prose
  • Poetry
Knowledge:
R5. Students know:
  • Literary devices are language that carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases.
  • Literary text often includes literary devices, such as personification, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, symbolism, metaphor, and simile.
  • Poetry is a genre of text that uses distinctive style and rhythm to aid in the expression of feelings, while prose is written in ordinary language.
Skills:
R5. Students are able to:
  • Identify literary devices in prose and poetry.
  • Explain the meaning of literary devices in prose and poetry.
Understanding:
R5. Students understand that:
  • Literary devices are often included in literary text, like prose and poems.
  • An author uses literary devices to convey meaning within the text.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
R6. Assess the formality of occasions in order to speak or write using appropriate language and tone.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Recurring Standard
Teacher Vocabulary:
R6.
  • Assess
  • Formality
  • Occasions
  • Appropriate language
  • Appropriate tone
Knowledge:
R6. Students know:
  • Some occasions (times and places) call for formal language and tone, while other occasions permit a casual communication.
Skills:
R6. Students are able to:
  • Assess the formality of occasions.
  • In formal occasions, speak and write with a formal language and tone.
  • In informal occasions, speak and write with a casual language and tone.
Understanding:
R6. Students understand that:
  • Different situations require different types of languages and tones.
Literacy Foundations
Phonics
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
1. Apply phonics and word analysis skills to encode and decode words in grade-level texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
1.
  • Encode
  • Decode
  • Phonics
  • Word analysis
Knowledge:
1. Students know:
  • Previously taught phonics and word-analysis skills.
  • Encode means to spell and decode means to read.
Skills:
1. Students are able to:
  • Apply phonics and word-analysis skills to spell grade-appropriate words.
  • Apply phonics and word-analysis skills to read words in grade-level texts.
Understanding:
1. Students understand that:
  • The phonics and word analysis skills they have learned in previously grades can be used to read fifth-grade level texts and spell fifth-grade level words.
Reception
Reading
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
2. Use combined knowledge of letter-sound correspondences, appropriate blending, syllabication patterns, morphology, and word attack skills to read unfamiliar multisyllabic, grade-level words accurately in context and in isolation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
2.
  • Letter-sound correspondence
  • Appropriate blending
  • Syllabication patterns
  • Word attack skills
  • Multisyllabic words
  • In context
  • In isolation
  • Morphology
Knowledge:
2. Students know:
  • Written letters are associated with spoken sounds, and words can be read by blending the sounds together.
  • Word attack skills involve dividing a word into syllables and recognizing syllable patterns.
  • Morphology can help divide words into their smallest meaningful parts that can be read and understood.
  • In isolation means reading a single word, while in context refers to reading skills within a larger text.
Skills:
2. Students are able to:
  • Read unfamiliar multisyllabic words in context and in isolation, drawing from a wide range of knowledge.
Understanding:
2. Students understand that:
  • The word recognition and word attack skills they have learned in previous grades can be used to read unfamiliar multisyllabic fifth-grade level words in isolation and within text.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
3. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
3.
  • Determine
  • Clarify
  • Multiple-meaning words
  • Multiple-meaning phrases
  • Flexibly
  • Strategy
Knowledge:
3. Students know:
  • There are several strategies that can be used to identify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases, including using context clues or knowledge of the word's morphological structure.
Skills:
3. Students are able to:
  • Apply a range of strategies to determine the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
Understanding:
3. Students understand that:
  • They have learned many strategies to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases, and they must select the best strategy based on the situation and task.
Expression
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
4. Write familiar and unfamiliar multisyllabic, grade-level appropriate words accurately in context and in isolation.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Phonics
Teacher Vocabulary:
4.
  • Multisyllabic words
  • In context
  • In isolation
Knowledge:
4. Students know:
  • Strategies to accurately spell multisyllabic words.
  • In isolation means writing a single word, while in context refers to writing skills within a larger text.
Skills:
4. Students are able to:
  • Accurately write familiar and unfamiliar multisyllabic words, in context and in isolation.
Understanding:
4. Students understand that:
  • The encoding skills and strategies they have learned in previous grades can be used to write familiar and unfamiliar multisyllabic fifth-grade level words.
Fluency
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
5. Demonstrate fluency when independently reading, writing, and speaking in response to grade-level literary and informational text, including stories, dramas, poetry, and cross-curricular texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
5.
  • Fluency
  • Independently
  • Literary text
  • Informational text
  • Stories
  • Dramas
  • Poetry
  • Cross-curricular texts
Knowledge:
5. Students know:
  • Fluency is the ability to read, write, or speak at a pace that does not negatively impact meaning or understanding.
  • Responding to text through writing and speaking demonstrates comprehension.
Skills:
5. Students are able to:
  • Independently read grade-level literary and informational text fluently.
  • Demonstrate fluency when writing.
  • Demonstrate fluent speech.
Understanding:
5. Students understand that:
  • The ability to read fluently supports comprehension, or understanding, of the text.
  • The ability to write and speak fluently helps clearly communicate with others.
  • One way to demonstrate comprehension of literary and informational text is to respond in writing or through speaking.
Reception
Reading
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 16
Classroom Resources: 16
6. Read grade-level text orally with accuracy, automaticity, appropriate prosody or expression, purpose, and understanding, self-correcting and rereading as necessary.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
6.
  • Accuracy
  • Automaticity
  • Prosody
  • Expression
  • Purpose
  • Understanding
  • Self-correcting
  • Rereading
Knowledge:
6. Students know:
  • Accurately means reading without mistakes, and automatically means knowing the words immediately without sounding them out.
  • Prosody is reading aloud with appropriate changes in voice, pitch, and expression.
  • Reading can occur for different purposes and setting a purpose for reading can improve comprehension.
  • Rereading is a strategy that aids in word recognition and comprehension.
Skills:
6. Students are able to:
  • Set a purpose prior to reading aloud.
  • Read aloud accurately, automatically, while using appropriate expression.
  • Self-correct and reread when necessary.
Understanding:
6. Students understand that:
  • Identifying their purpose for reading prior to beginning to read can improve their comprehension of the text.
  • Fluent readers are accurate, automatic, and use appropriate voice expression.
  • If a word is misread, they need to self-correct and reread.
  • If their comprehension begins to break down, they need to reread to improve their understanding.
Expression
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Classroom Resources: 3
7. Write routinely and independently for varied amounts of time.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
7.
  • Routinely
  • Independently
Knowledge:
7. Student know:
  • Routinely means on a consistent basis, and independently means without help from others.
  • Writing skills.
Skills:
7. Students are able to:
  • Writing on a consistent basis without support from others for various time frames.
Understanding:
7. Students understand that:
  • Writing can be done for many purposes and over many different time frames.
Speaking
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
8. Orally present information and original ideas clearly.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
8.
  • Orally
  • Present
  • Original ideas
Knowledge:
8. Students know:
  • Oral language and literacy skills.
Skills:
8. Students are able to:
  • Present information and original ideas through speaking.
Understanding:
8. Students understand that:
  • They can share their ideas and other information with others through speaking clearly.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 4
9. Express ideas clearly and effectively to diverse partners or groups.

a. Pose and respond to explicit questions in ways that contribute to the discussion and elaborate on the remarks of others.

b. Verbally summarize information read aloud or presented in diverse media and formats.

c. Report orally on a topic or text, sequencing ideas logically and supporting main ideas with appropriate facts and relevant details.

d. Speak clearly at an understandable rate.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
9.
  • Express
  • Clearly
  • Effectively
  • Diverse
9a.
  • Pose
  • Respond
  • Explicit questions
  • Contribute
  • Elaborate
  • Remarks
9b.
  • Summarize
  • Diverse media
  • Diverse formats
9c.
  • Report
  • Orally
  • Sequencing
  • Logically
  • Main ideas
  • Appropriate facts
  • Relevant details
9d.
  • Understandable rate
Knowledge:
9. Students know:
  • Oral language and literacy skills.
  • Collaboration skills.
9a.
  • Effective communication with others requires asking questions, responding to questions, and elaborating on others' statements.
9b.
  • A summary is a short statement explaining the main point or most important details of presented information.
9c. Student know:
  • An effective oral presentation includes a logical sequence of main ideas that are supported by appropriate and relevant facts and details.
9d.
  • An effective speaker pronounces words clearly and speaks at a speed that is understandable by the audience.
Skills:
9. Students are able to:
  • Clearly and effectively share ideas with others through speaking.
9a.
  • Pose questions that contribute to discussions.
  • Respond to explicit questions in ways that contribute to discussions.
  • Expand on others' comments by adding additional relevant information.
9b.
  • Present a summary of information read aloud or presented in diverse formats through speaking.
9c.
  • Orally report on a topic or text.
  • Sequence ideas logically in an oral report.
  • Support main ideas with appropriate facts and relevant details in an oral report.
9d.
  • Speak clearly at an understandable rate when orally presenting information.
Understanding:
9. Students understand that:
  • They can communicate with a variety of people if they express themselves clearly.
9a.
  • Discussions should include relevant questions, answers to questions, comments, and remarks.
9b.
  • Summarizing information demonstrates understanding and can help communicate ideas with others.
9c.
  • To be an effective speaker, they must logically sequence presented ideas and include appropriate facts and relevant details to support their main points.
9d.
  • To be understood by the audience, a speaker must clearly pronounce words and speak at an understandable pace.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
10. Respond directly to specific information shared by others in classroom discussion, using facts to support the ideas being discussed.

a. Review the key ideas expressed and draw conclusions in light of information and knowledge gained from discussion.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Fluency
Teacher Vocabulary:
10.
  • Specific information
  • Discussion
10a.
  • Key ideas
  • Draw conclusions
Knowledge:
10. Students know:
  • Effective discussions require participants to respond to others using facts to support their ideas.
10a.
  • New information and knowledge can be gained through classroom discussion by drawing conclusions from the presented information.
Skills:
10. Students are able to:
  • Participate in classroom discussions by responding directly to specific information shared by others.
  • Use facts to support the ideas they discuss.
10a.
  • Review key ideas presented in classroom discussions.
  • Draw conclusions from key ideas presented in classroom discussions.
Understanding:
10. Students understand that:
  • Classroom discussions can lead to learning if they actively participate.
  • Active participation requires responding to information shared by others and using facts to support the ideas discussed.
10a.
  • They can analyze key ideas and draw conclusions from information and knowledge gained from classroom discussions.
Vocabulary
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 6
Classroom Resources: 2
11. Acquire and use grade-level vocabulary, clarifying the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases in text, choosing flexibly from a range of strategies.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
11.
  • Acquire
  • Use
  • Grade-level vocabulary
  • Clarifying
  • Multiple-meaning words and phrases
  • Range of strategies
Knowledge:
11. Students know:
  • Techniques to learn and use new grade-level vocabulary words.
  • Strategies to determine the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words.
Skills:
11. Students are able to:
  • Learn and use grade-level vocabulary words.
  • Clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases in text using a variety of strategies.
Understanding:
11. Students understand that:
  • New vocabulary can be learned from text, and they should use grade-level vocabulary in writing and speaking.
  • There are many strategies to learn the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases in text, such as using context clues, consulting reference materials, or using knowledge of the word's morphological structure.
Reception
Reading
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 21
Learning Activities: 12
Classroom Resources: 9
12. Interpret the meaning of words, phrases, and patterns as they are used in texts, including domain-specific and academic vocabulary and figurative language.

a. Locate similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and idioms and interpret their meanings in context.

b. Explain the meanings of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.

c. Use the relationships between synonyms, antonyms, and homographs to increase understanding of word meanings.

d. Explain how an author's vocabulary and style influence the tone and mood of a text and support his/her purpose for writing.

e. Use common, grade-appropriate Greek and Latin affixes and roots as clues to the meanings of words.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
12.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary
  • Academic vocabulary
  • Figurative language
12a.
  • Similes
  • Metaphors
  • Personification
  • Hyperbole
  • Imagery
  • Alliteration
  • Onomatopoeia
  • Idioms
12b.
  • Common idioms
  • Common adages
  • Common proverbs
12c.
  • Synonyms
  • Antonyms
  • Homographs
12d.
  • Author's vocabulary
  • Author's style
  • Tone
  • Mood
  • Purpose
12e.
  • Common Latin roots
  • Common Greek roots
  • Common Latin affixes
  • Common Greek affixes
Knowledge:
12. Student know:
  • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
  • Figurative language is a creative way to use words and phrases beyond their literal definition to explain or describe something.
  • Strategies to determine the meaning of words, phrases, and patterns in text.
12a.
  • Figurative language is a creative way to use words and phrases beyond their literal definition to explain or describe something.
  • Examples of figurative language include similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and idioms.
12b.
  • Idioms, adages, and proverbs are all figures of speech, in which the words and phrases carry meaning beyond their literal definitions.
  • An idiom is a common saying with a meaning different from that of its individual words.
  • Adages and proverbs are well-known sayings that have been used for a long time.
  • Proverbs usually give practical advice about ways to behave and live.
12c.
  • Words with opposite meanings are antonyms, and words with similar meanings are synonyms.
  • Homographs are words that are spelled the same, but not necessarily pronounced the same and have different meanings and origins.
12d.
  • Authors choose particular vocabulary and write in a specific style depending on the purpose of the writing and the tone and mood they intend to create.
  • Tone is the attitude of a writer toward a subject or an audience, and mood is the overall feeling, or atmosphere, of a text.
12e.
  • Many English words and English morphemes originated from ancient Latin and Greek languages.
  • Understanding Latin and Greek roots and affixes can provide clues to meanings of unknown words.
Skills:
12. Students are able to:
  • Interpret the meaning of domain-specific vocabulary, academic vocabulary, and figurative language as they are used in texts.
12a.
  • Identify examples of similes, metaphors, personification, hyperbole, imagery, alliteration, onomatopoeia, and idioms in text.
  • Interpret the meaning of the figurative language in context.
12b.
  • Identify examples of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.
  • Explain the meanings of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.
12c.
  • Use synonyms, antonyms, and homographs to interpret word meaning.
12d.
  • Identify the tone and mood of a text.
  • Explain how an author's vocabulary and writing style influence the tone and mood of the text.
  • Identify an author's purpose for writing a text.
  • Explain how an author's vocabulary and writing style support their purpose for writing the text.
12e.
  • Identify and use Latin and Greek affixes and roots as clues to the meaning of a word.
Understanding:
12. Students understand that:
  • There are multiple strategies they can use to interpret the meaning of academic and domain-specific vocabulary, including using context clues in the text, their background knowledge, the morphological structure of the word, and outside resources.
  • Words and phrases, including figurative language, can have different meanings in different texts.
12a.
  • Figurative language carries meaning other than the literal meaning of the words or phrases, and authors choose to include figurative language in text to enhance the text's meaning.
12b.
  • Idioms, adages, and proverbs are figures of speech that carry meaning beyond the literal definitions of the words.
  • To fully comprehend text that contains figures of speech, they must learn the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs.
12c.
  • The relationships between words can be used to increase vocabulary knowledge.
12d.
  • Authors select specific words and write in a particular style to set a tone and mood for the text, and indicate their purpose for writing the text.
12e.
  • The meaning of an unknown word can be learned by knowing the morphology and orthography of the word, including its origin.
Listening
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 3
13. Determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
13.
  • Determine
  • Clarify
  • Multiple-meaning words and phrases
Knowledge:
13. Students know:
  • Strategies to determine or clarify the meaning of unknown and multiple-meaning words and phrases in spoken language.
  • Active listening skills.
Skills:
13. Students are able to:
  • Determine the meaning of unknown words and phrases in spoken language.
  • Clarify the meaning of multiple-meaning words and phrases in spoken language.
Understanding:
13. Students understand that:
  • When listening to to others speak, they may hear word they don't know or a word that has multiple meanings depending on the context.
  • They must use active listening skills to determine an unknown's word's meaning or to clarify the meaning of a multiple-meaning word.
Expression
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Classroom Resources: 8
14. Write using grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases accurately, including those that signal contrasting ideas, additional information, and other logical relationships.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
14.
  • General academic vocabulary
  • Domain-specific vocabulary
  • Words that signal contrasting ideas
  • Words that signal additional information
  • Words that signal other logical relationships
Knowledge:
14. Students know:
  • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
  • There are words and phrases that can be used in writing to signal relationships between ideas.
  • Academic, domain-specific vocabulary should be used in school writing.
Skills:
14. Students are able to:
  • Accurately use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in writing.
  • Accurately use words and phrases that signal contrasting ideas, additional information, and other logical relationships between ideas in writing.
Understanding:
14. Students understand that:
  • It is important to use academic, domain-specific vocabulary in formal settings, like school writing.
  • They can show relationships between their ideas in writings by using particular words and phrases.
Speaking
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
15. Use grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases during presentations and discussion.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Vocabulary
Teacher Vocabulary:
15.
  • General academic vocabulary
  • Domain-specific vocabulary
  • Presentations
  • Discussions
Knowledge:
15. Students know:
  • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
  • Academic, domain-specific vocabulary should be used in school for presentations and discussions.
Skills:
15. Students are able to:
  • Use academic and domain-specific words in speech.
Understanding:
15. Students understand that:
  • It is important to use academic, domain-specific vocabulary in formal settings, like school discussions and presentations.
Comprehension
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 10
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 6
Unit Plans: 1
16. Demonstrate comprehension of varied literary and informational texts by utilizing its content when discussing or writing in response to the text.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
16.
  • Comprehension
  • Literary text
  • Informational text
  • Discussing
  • Writing
  • Response
Knowledge:
16. Students know:
  • Comprehension of text can be demonstrated by referring to the text in discussions or written responses.
  • Informational text is nonfiction text, and literary text is fictional.
Skills:
16. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate understanding of varied literary and informational text by referring to the text in discussions.
  • Demonstrate understanding of varied literary and informational text by referring to the text in written responses.
Understanding:
16. Students understand that:
  • They can show that they understood a wide variety of literary and informational text by discussing or writing about specific content from the text.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 8
17. Demonstrate comprehension of text by asking and responding to questions about literary elements used in the text.

Examples: theme, plot, point of view
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
17.
  • Demonstrate
  • Comprehension
  • Literary elements
Knowledge:
17. Students know:
  • Literary elements within a story include the theme, plot, and point of view.
  • Comprehension can be demonstrated by asking and answering questions about a text.
Skills:
17. Students are able to:
  • Ask questions about literary elements used in the text to demonstrate comprehension.
  • Respond to questions about literary elements used in the text to demonstrate comprehension.
Understanding:
17. Students understand that:
  • They can show they understood a story they read by asking and answering questions about specific literary elements.
Reception
Reading
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 2
18. Explain the relationships among events, people, or concepts in informational texts, supported by textual evidence.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
18.
  • Relationships
  • Events
  • People
  • Concepts
  • Informational text
  • Textual evidence
Knowledge:
18. Students know:
  • Informational text often explains the relationships among events, people, or concepts (ideas).
  • Comprehension can be demonstrated by referring to specific evidence in the text.
Skills:
18. Students are able to:
  • Explain the relationships among events, people, or concepts in informational text by providing textual evidence.
Understanding:
18. Students understand that:
  • They can show they understood informational text by using specific text evidence to support their explanations.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
19. Interpret how authors use literary elements throughout a text, including character, setting, conflict, dialogue, and point of view.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
19.
  • Interpret
  • Literary elements
  • Character
  • Setting
  • Conflict
  • Dialogue
  • Point of view
Knowledge:
19. Students know:
  • Authors use literary elements, such as character, setting, conflict, dialogue, and point of view, throughout a text to develop and drive the plot.
Skills:
19. Students are able to:
  • Identify literary elements in a text.
  • Interpret how authors use literary elements throughout a text.
Understanding:
19. Students understand that:
  • Interpreting the author's use of literary elements in a text supports their overall comprehension of the text.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
20. Explain how the author's use of character types throughout a narrative helps drive its plot.

Examples: static, dynamic, and stock characters
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
20.
  • Character types
  • Static characters
  • Dynamic characters
  • Stock character
  • Narrative
  • Plot
Knowledge:
20. Students know:
  • Authors use different character types to develop, or drive, the plot.
  • A static character does not change during the narrative, while a dynamic character exhibits many changes.
  • A stock character represents a particular stereotype and is recognizable as belonging to a certain genre.
Skills:
20. Students are able to:
  • Identify different character types in a narrative.
  • Explain how the author's use of character types develops the narrative's plot.
Understanding:
20. Students understand that:
  • Character types used in a story help determine the plot of the narrative.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Classroom Resources: 2
21. Compare and contrast characters, points of view, or events in two or more literary texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
21.
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Characters
  • Point of view
  • Events
  • Literary texts
Knowledge:
21. Students know:
  • Compare means tell how things are alike or similar, and contrast means tell how things are different.
  • There will be similarities and differences between characters, points of view, and events among literary texts.
Skills:
21. Students are able to:
  • Identify similarities between characters, points, of view, or events in two or more literary texts.
  • Identify differences between characters, points, of view, or events in two or more literary texts.
Understanding:
21. Students understand that:
  • Although literary texts may have common elements, like characters, points of view, and plot events, there will similarities and differences among these elements.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
22. Determine the implied and/or explicit main idea in literary and informational texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
22.
  • Implied main idea
  • Explicit main idea
  • Literary text
  • Informational text
Knowledge:
22. Students know:
  • The main idea is the most important idea presented in the text.
  • Sometimes an author will clearly state the main idea, while other times an author will merely suggest the main idea.
Skills:
22. Students are able to:
  • Identify the implied or explicit main idea of a text.
Understanding:
22. Students understand that:
  • Most texts have a main idea, or most important message.
  • An author can choose to state the main idea in the text or provide clues through details in the text to imply the main idea.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 2
Classroom Resources: 6
23. Determine and analyze themes of various culturally-diverse literary texts, supporting analysis with textual evidence.

a. Analyze common themes of diverse texts with support from textual evidence.

b. Summarize a story or drama, describing how the plot unfolds and how characters respond to challenges or change their thoughts and actions and citing textual evidence.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
23.
  • Determine
  • Analyze
  • Themes
  • Culturally-diverse literary text
  • Textual evidence
23a.
  • Theme
  • Diverse texts
  • Textual evidence
23b.
  • Summarize
  • Plot
  • Characters
  • Thoughts
  • Actions
  • Citing
  • Textual evidence
Knowledge:
23. Students know:
  • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text.
  • An author develops a theme by including specific details in the text to help the reader identify and understand the theme.
  • There are common, or universal, themes that frequently appear in literary text.
23a.
  • There are common, or universal, themes that frequently appear in literary text.
23b.
  • A summary of a story or drama is a short statement that describes the main events of the plot and the actions of the primary characters.
Skills:
23. Students are able to:
  • Identify the themes of various culturally-diverse literary texts.
  • Analyze the themes of various culturally-diverse literary texts using text evidence.
23a.
  • Identify common themes in diverse texts.
  • Analyze the meaning of common themes from diverse texts using textual evidence.
23b.
  • Create a summary of a story or drama that includes the main plot events and describes how characters external or internal actions.
  • Cite textual evidence to support summary statements.
Understanding:
23. Students understand that:
  • Literature often includes universal (common) themes, and the author suggests the theme of the text by including particular details about characters or events.
  • They can demonstrate they understood the theme of a story by using text evidence to support their identification.
23a.
  • Literature often includes universal (common) themes, and they can show they identified the theme by supporting their analysis with text evidence.
23b.
  • A summary is a short explanation of the most important elements from a text, and statements in a summary should be supported with textual evidence.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
24. Determine and evaluate the effectiveness of digital and print text features and structures, including comparison and contrast, problem and solution, and cause and effect.

a. Identify various text features used in diverse forms of text.

b. Compare and contrast the overall structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in multiple texts.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
24.
  • Determine
  • Evaluate
  • Effectiveness
  • Digital text features
  • Print text features
  • Text structures
  • Comparison and contrast
  • Problem and solution
  • Cause and effect
24a.
  • Text features
24b.
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Events
  • Ideas
  • Concepts
  • Information
Knowledge:
24. Students know:
  • Text features are items like charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages.
  • Text features can provide additional information or enhance understanding of the text.
  • Text can be structured in different ways, depending on the type of information that is being communicated.
  • A text that follows a comparison and contrast structure will describe how two or more things are alike or different.
  • Problem and solution text structure describes a problem and how the problem was solved or could be solved.
  • Cause and effect text structure describes an event (the cause) and the consequence or result of the event (the effect).
24a.
  • Text features are items like charts, graphs, diagrams, time lines, animations, or interactive elements on Web pages.
  • Text features can provide additional information or enhance understanding of the text.
24b.
  • Compare means tell how things are alike or similar, and contrast means tell how things are different.
  • There will be similarities and differences among the structure of events, ideas, concepts, and information across multiple texts.
Skills:
24. Students are able to:
  • Identify digital and print text features and structures.
  • Evaluate the effectiveness of digital and print text features and structures in communicating the intended meaning.
24a.
  • Identify text features in varied forms of texts.
24b.
  • Identify similarities between the structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
  • Identify differences between the structure of events, ideas, concepts, or information in two or more texts.
Understanding:
24. Students understand that:
  • Text features can be found in printed and digital text materials.
  • Text features often provide important information about details in the text or can enhance understanding of details in the text.
  • Texts follow a predictable structure that contributes to the overall meaning of the text.
  • They can demonstrate comprehension of the text by evaluating on the purpose and effectiveness of the text features and structure the author chose to use.
24a.
  • Text features often provide important information about details in the text or can enhance understanding of details in the text.
24b.
  • Comparing and contrasting multiple texts helps them better comprehend the texts and synthesize information from multiple sources.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
25. Determine credibility and appropriateness of a research source by distinguishing between fact and the author's opinion in informational text.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
25.
  • Credibility
  • Research
  • Fact
  • Opinion
  • Informational text
Knowledge:
25. Students know:
  • A fact is a statement that can be proven with evidence, while an opinion is a personal belief that cannot be proven true in every case.
  • Informational text can present both facts and opinions.
  • Informational text that presents verified facts tends to be more credible and appropriate as a research source.
Skills:
25. Students are able to:
  • Distinguish between fact and the author's opinion in informational text.
  • Determine the credibility and appropriateness of a research source by identifying the facts and the author's opinions.
Understanding:
25. Students understand that:
  • A fact is a thing that is known or proved to be true, and an opinion is a personal view or judgment about something.
  • They can determine if a statement is a fact or an opinion using their current knowledge or by referencing other materials.
  • To be a credible, appropriate research source, an informational text must present mostly verified facts.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 16
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 10
Unit Plans: 1
26. Analyze how two or more texts address similar topics in diverse media and formats, including graphics, live and/or recorded performances, and written works.

a. Explain how visual and multimedia elements contribute to the overall meaning and tone of a text.

b. Compare and contrast the approaches to theme in several stories within a genre.

c. Locate information quickly within a text and apply information from multiple sources to analysis of the topics.

d. Explain how an author uses reasons and evidence to support particular points in a text.

e. Compare the approaches of several authors of articles about the same or similar topics.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
26.
  • Analyze
  • Topics
  • Diverse media and formats
  • Graphics
  • Live and/or recorded performances
  • Written works
26a.
  • Visual elements
  • Multimedia elements
  • Overall meaning
  • Tone
26b.
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Theme
  • Genre
26c.
  • Locate
  • Analysis
  • Topic
26d.
  • Explain
  • Reasons
  • Evidence
  • Points
26e.
  • Compare
  • Approaches
  • Articles
  • Topics
Knowledge:
26. Students know:
  • Strategies to analyze text and diverse media formats.
  • Similar topics can be presented in different formats.
26a.
  • A creator chooses to include visual or multimedia elements in text to convey a particular tone and meaning.
  • Tone is the attitude of a writer toward a subject or an audience.
26b.
  • Compare means to tell how something is similar and contrast is to tell how something is different.
  • Theme is the main, recurring idea in a text.
  • Stories within a genre will have similar in forms, styles, or subject matter.
26c.
  • Strategies to locate information quickly in a text, such as utilizing text features.
  • Techniques to synthesize information from multiple sources.
26d.
  • Authors often include logical reasons and evidence to support their points.
26e.
  • Compare is to tell how something is similar.
  • Authors that write about similar topics will often have similar approaches to explaining the content.
Skills:
26. Students are able to:
  • Analyze and explain how two or more texts explain similar topics in diverse media and formats.
26a.
  • Identify visual and multimedia elements in text.
  • Describe the overall meaning and tone of text.
  • Explain how the visual and multimedia elements impact the overall meaning and tone of the text.
26b.
  • Identify and describe the theme of a story.
  • Identify similarities between themes of texts in the same genre.
  • Identify differences between themes of texts in the same genre.
26c.
  • Quickly find information within a text.
  • Analyze text topics by applying information from multiple sources.
26d.
  • Identify key points in a text.
  • Identify reasons and evidence that support the author's points.
  • Explain how the author uses reasons and evidence to support their key points.
26e.
  • Identify similarities of writing approaches in articles with the same or similar topics.
Understanding:
26. Students understand that:
  • Similar concepts can be explained in different ways depending on the format of the text and the viewpoint of the author.
26a.
  • Visual and multimedia elements are added to text to enhance or clarify the overall meaning and create a tone.
26b.
  • Identifying, describing, and analyzing themes of stories within the same genre improves their comprehension of the text and their knowledge of text genres.
26c.
  • Quickly finding information in a text is an important skill they will use in various situations.
  • To deeply analyze a topic, they must combine information from multiple sources.
26d.
  • Authors use logical reasoning and factual evidence to support their points.
26e.
  • Authors who choose to write about the same topics will often have similar approaches.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
27. Review the key ideas expressed in a text and draw conclusions, using facts to support them.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
27.
  • Key ideas
  • Conclusions
  • Facts
Knowledge:
27. Students know:
  • New knowledge can be gained from a text by drawing conclusions from the information presented in the text.
Skills:
27. Students are able to:
  • Review key ideas presented in text.
  • Draw conclusions from key ideas presented in text.
  • Use facts from the text to support their conclusions.
Understanding:
27. Students understand that:
  • They can analyze key ideas, draw conclusions, and learn new information by reading text.
Listening
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
28. Use audio and/or visual sources of information to obtain the answer to a question.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
28.
  • Audio sources
  • Visual sources
Knowledge:
28. Students know:
  • Questions can be answered by utilizing information from audio or visual visual sources.
Skills:
28. Students are able to:
  • Answer a question by using relevant information from an audio and/or visual source.
Understanding:
28. Students understand that:
  • Information can be obtained from a variety of sources.
Expression
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 3
Classroom Resources: 3
29. Summarize in writing a variety of texts, stating their implied and/or explicit main ideas.

a. Use textual evidence to support summarization.

b. Cite appropriately when summarizing.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
29.
  • Summarize
  • Implied main idea
  • Explicit main idea
29a.
  • Textual evidence
  • Summarization
29b.
  • Cite
  • Summarizing
Knowledge:
29. Students know:
  • The main idea is the most important idea presented in the text.
  • Sometimes an author will clearly state the main idea, while other times an author will merely suggest the main idea.
  • A summary is a short statement explaining the main point or most important details of presented information.
  • Writing skills.
29a.
  • A summary is a short statement explaining the main point or most important details of presented information.
  • Summary statements can be supported by including evidence from the text.
29b.
  • Citation conventions.
  • Text evidence must be cited appropriately in writing.
Skills:
29. Students are able to:
  • Identify the implied or explicit main idea of a text.
  • Write a summary stating the implied and/or explicit main idea(s) of a text.
29a.
  • Use textual evidence to support summary statements.
29b.
  • Appropriately cite text evidence in a written summary.
Understanding:
29. Students understand that:
  • Most texts have a main idea, or most important message.
  • An author can choose to state the main idea in the text or provide clues through details in the text to imply the main idea.
  • They can demonstrate their comprehension of the text by writing a summary that explains the main idea(s).
29a.
  • They can demonstrate their comprehension of the text by writing a summary that includes textual evidence.
29b.
  • When they use text evidence in their writing, they must give the original creator credit by including appropriate citations.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Classroom Resources: 2
30. Quote literary and informational texts accurately to support conclusions and inferences drawn from them.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
30.
  • Quote
  • Literary texts
  • Informational texts
  • Conclusions
  • Inferences
Knowledge:
30. Students know:
  • Explicit information in a text can be used to draw conclusions and support inferences.
  • Conventions for using direct quotations in writing.
Skills:
30. Students are able to:
  • Draw conclusions and make inferences from literary and informational texts.
  • Accurately quote literary and informational texts to support their conclusions and inferences.
Understanding:
30. Students understand that:
  • Accurately quoting a text in their writing ensures they are giving the original creator credit for their work.
  • Conclusions and inferences can be supported with explicit information from the text.
Speaking
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
31. Include multimedia components and visual displays in presentations to enhance the development of main ideas or themes when appropriate.

Examples: graphics, sounds
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Comprehension
Teacher Vocabulary:
31.
  • Visual displays
  • Presentations
  • Main ideas
  • Themes
  • Multimedia components
Knowledge:
31. Students know:
  • Multimedia components and visual displays can help others better understand the key ideas and themes of an oral presentation.
  • Methods to add multimedia components or visual displays to presentations.
Skills:
31. Students are able to:
  • Add multimedia components (e.g. audio) and visual displays (e.g. graphics) to presentations to enhance the development of main ideas or themes.
Understanding:
31. Students understand that:
  • Multimedia components and visual displays can help others understand the key ideas and themes of their oral presentations.
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
32. Respond in writing to literature and informational text, including stories, dramas, poetry, and cross-curricular texts, independently and with grade-level proficiency.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
32.
  • Literature
  • Informational text
  • Stories
  • Dramas
  • Poetry
  • Cross-curricular texts
  • Independently
  • Proficiency
Knowledge:
32. Students know:
  • Responding to text in a written format demonstrates comprehension of the text.
Skills:
32. Students are able to:
  • Independently create grade-appropriate written responses after reading literature and informational text.
Understanding:
32. Students understand that:
  • To respond in writing to literature and informational texts, they must read critically, have a deep understanding of the text's content, and use appropriate writing skills.
Expression
Writing
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
33. Write fluently and legibly in cursive, using correctly formed letters with appropriate spacing and placing text elements correctly on the page.

Examples: headings, titles, paragraph indentions
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
33.
  • Fluently
  • Legibly
  • Cursive
  • Correctly formed letters
  • Appropriate spacing
  • Text elements
Knowledge:
33. Students know:
  • Legible writing can be read by others.
  • Fluent writing is writing at a consistent pace.
  • Cursive writing strokes for all letters.
  • Cursive writing connects the letters within words.
  • Appropriate spacing should occur between words.
  • Text elements, like headings, titles, and paragraph indentations, must be located in a certain place on a page.
Skills:
33. Students are able to:
  • Write legibly in cursive at a steady pace.
  • Connect and correctly form cursive letters.
  • Include appropriate spacing between words.
  • Place text elements, like headings, titles, and paragraph indentations, in the correct location on a page.
Understanding:
33. Students understand that:
  • Cursive writing is a special type of writing that connects letters within words.
  • Appropriate spacing is important so that readers can tell where one cursive word ends and the next begins.
  • There are standard conventions for text elements that should be followed in formal writing.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 26
Learning Activities: 7
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 17
34. Write personal or fictional narratives incorporating literary elements (characters, plot, setting, conflict), dialogue, strong voice, and clear event sequences.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
34.
  • Personal narratives
  • Fictional narratives
  • Literary elements
  • Characters
  • Plot
  • Setting
  • Conflict
  • Dialogue
  • Voice
  • Event sequences
Knowledge:
34. Students know:
  • A narrative is a piece of writing that tells a story.
  • A personal narrative tells about an event that was personally experienced by the author, while a fictional narrative tells a made-up story.
  • A narrative story describes a sequence of plot events in a logical order (beginning, middle, end).
  • Narrative writing includes text elements, like characters, setting, and conflict.
  • Dialogue is a conversation between two or more characters in a text.
Skills:
34. Students are able to:
  • Write a personal narrative that recalls a personal experience or a fictional narrative with a made-up story.
  • Write a narrative with a logical sequence of plot events.
  • Incorporate literary elements into their narrative writing, like characters, setting, and conflict.
  • Include dialogue in narrative writing.
  • Use a strong voice in writing by developing a personal writing style.
Understanding:
34. Students understand that:
  • Narrative writing includes predictable elements, like a logical sequence of events and characters, setting, and conflict.
  • Incorporating dialogue between the characters can add details to their narrative writing.
  • Narrative writing can be used to tell about something that happened to them personally or it can tell a story they made up.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 17
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Classroom Resources: 11
35. Write informative or explanatory texts using multiple sources to examine a topic, conveying ideas and information clearly and incorporating a strong organizational structure, relevant details, and elaboration.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
35.
  • Informative text
  • Explanatory text
  • Sources
  • Topic
  • Organizational structure
  • Details
  • Elaboration
Knowledge:
35. Students know:
  • Informative or explanatory text is a piece of writing that provides factual information that was gathered from multiple research sources.
  • Informative or explanatory text begins by introducing the topic, provides facts and relevant details, and ends with a conclusion.
  • Elaboration means supplying additional information about details by using academic vocabulary or including text features.
Skills:
35. Students are able to:
  • Gather information from multiple sources.
  • Write an informative or explanatory text using information gathered from sources.
  • Write an informative or explanatory text with a clear, organized structure.
  • Elaborate on details included in the text using academic vocabulary or text features.
Understanding:
35. Students understand that:
  • Informative or explanatory writing follows a predictable text structure that includes introducing the topic, providing facts or additional details about the topic, and ends with a conclusion.
  • They must gather their facts about the topic from multiple research sources.
  • Writers elaborate details included in the text by using formal academic vocabulary and text features.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 4
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 3
36. Write an argument to persuade the reader to take an action or adopt a position, stating a claim, supporting the claim with relevant evidence from sources, using connectives to link ideas, and presenting a strong conclusion.

Examples: first, as a result, therefore, in addition
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
36.
  • Argument
  • Persuade
  • Take an action
  • Adopt a position
  • Claim
  • Relevant evidence
  • Sources
  • Connectives
  • Conclusion
Knowledge:
36. Students know:
  • The purpose of argumentative writing is to convince the reader to take action or adopt a particular position.
  • Argumentative writing includes introducing the topic by stating an argumentative claim, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a concluding statement.
  • Evidence to support the argument must be collected from various sources.
  • Connective words, like first, as a result, therefore, in addition, are used to link ideas in argumentative writing.
Skills:
36. Students are able to:
  • Write an argument to convince a reader to take action or adopt a position.
  • Include a claim, logical reasoning supported by evidence, and a conclusion in argumentative writing.
  • Gather evidence from relevant sources to support a claim.
  • Use connective words to link their ideas within the writing.
Understanding:
36. Students understand that:
  • To persuade a reader to take action or adopt an opinion, they must present logical reasoning supported by evidence from relevant sources.
  • Connective words can help connect their argument to the evidence supporting their argument.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Classroom Resources: 1
37. Write about research findings independently over short and/or extended periods of time.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
37.
  • Research findings
  • Independently
  • Short periods of time
  • Extended periods of time
Knowledge:
37. Students know:
  • Researching a topic begins by finding information from multiple sources.
  • Independent writing skills.
Skills:
37. Students are able to:
  • Find information on a particular topic from a variety of research sources.
  • Independently write about research findings over short and extended periods of time.
Understanding:
37. Students understand that:
  • They can share information they have learned about a topic through writing.
  • Some writing projects will last a short time, while others may take longer to complete.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 17
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 13
Unit Plans: 1
38. Gather information on a topic or question, and share the results through various modes of writing, including projects and presentations.

a. Locate information in print and digital sources.

b. Summarize, quote, and paraphrase information in notes and finished work, providing a list of sources.

c. Integrate information from several texts on the same topic into presentations of research.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
38.
  • Topic
  • Question
  • Results
  • Modes of writing
  • Projects
  • Presentations
38a.
  • Print
  • Digital
38b.
  • Summarize
  • Quote
  • Paraphrase
  • Notes
  • Finished work
  • List of sources
38c.
  • Integrate
  • Topic
  • Presentations of research
Knowledge:
38. Students know:
  • Effective research skills.
  • Transferable writing skills applicable to many modes of writing.
38a.
  • Information can be found in both digital and print sources.
38b.
  • Summarizing is putting the main idea(s) of the source into their own words.
  • Quoting is using direct evidence from the source material.
  • Paraphrasing is condensing the original source by broadly explaining the content.
  • Summarizing, quoting, and paraphrasing are important note taking skills, but they can also be used in formal writing pieces.
  • Credit must be attributed to the original creator of the work by including a list of sources.
38c.
  • Research presentations should include information that is incorporated from several sources.
Skills:
38. Students are able to:
  • Research information from a variety of sources to explain a topic or answer a question.
  • Share information learned through research in various modes of writing, including projects and presentations.
38a.
  • Locate information in print and digital sources.
38b.
  • Summarize, quote, and paraphrase information in written notes and finished work.
  • Include a list of sources with written summaries and paraphrases.
38c.
  • Combine information from several texts on the same topic into one piece of work.
Understanding:
38. Students understand that:
  • They can share their research findings through multiple modes of writing, including presentations and projects.
38a.
  • An effective writer uses multiple sources of information, including print and digital sources.
38b.
  • Including a list of sources with their writing ensures they are giving the original creator credit for their work.
38c.
  • Effective research presentations include multiple sources of information that are integrated in one coherent project.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 18
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 15
39. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage in writing.

a. Evaluate the usage of pronouns for the proper case.

Examples: subjective, objective, possessive

b. Identify inappropriate shifts in pronoun number and person.

c. Use varied pronouns and their antecedents correctly in composing and revising writing.

d. Use subject-verb agreement correctly when composing and revising writing.

e. Use verb tenses to convey various times, sequences, states, and conditions.

f. Recognize and correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, including subject-verb agreement.

g. Use perfect verb tenses to compose and revise writing.

h. Use correlative conjunctions correctly when composing and revising writing.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
39.
  • Demonstrate
  • Command
  • Conventions
  • Standard English grammar
  • Standard English usage
39a.
  • Evaluate
  • Pronouns
  • Proper case
  • Subjective
  • Objective
  • Possessive
39b.
  • Identify
  • Inappropriate shifts
  • Pronoun number
  • Pronoun person
39c.
  • Pronoun
  • Antecedents
  • Composing
  • Revising
39d.
  • Subject-verb agreement
  • Composing
  • Writing
39e.
  • Verb tenses
  • Times Sequences States Conditions
39f.
  • Recognize
  • Correct
  • Inappropriate shifts
  • Verb tense
  • Subject-verb agreement
39g.
  • Perfect verb tenses
  • Compose
  • Revise
39h.
  • Correlative conjunctions
  • Composing
  • Revising
Knowledge:
39. Students know:
  • Standard English grammar and usage conventions.
39a.
  • There are three cases of pronouns: subjective, objective, and possessive.
  • The subjective case is used when the pronoun is used as a subject in a sentence.
  • The objective case is used when the pronoun is used as an object of a verb or preposition.
  • The possessive case is a pronoun that expresses ownership.
39b.
  • There are three person pronouns in English: first-person, second-person, and third-person.
  • First-person is used when an author is talking about themselves (I, me, we).
  • Second-person is used when an author is talking directly to the reader (you).
  • In the third person, there are distinct pronoun forms for male, female, and neutral gender (e.g., he, she, it).
  • In addition to person, pronouns also show the number of individuals involved; there are two numbers: singular and plural.
39c.
  • The noun or noun substitute that a pronoun refers to is called its antecedent.
  • To create engaging writing, authors should use a variety of pronouns and antecedents.
39d.
  • A subject and its verb must both be singular or both plural.
39e.
  • The tense of a verb tells you when a person did something or when something existed or happened.
  • In English, there are three main tenses: the present, the past, and the future.
  • There are regular verbs that follow a predictable pattern when changing tenses, but there are also irregular verbs that can change their entire spelling when changing tenses.
39f.
  • The tense of a verb tells you when a person did something or when something existed or happened.
  • A subject and its verb must both be singular or both plural.
39g.
  • Perfect verb tense is used to show an action that is complete and finished.
  • This tense is expressed by adding one of the auxiliary verbs have, has, or had to the past participle form of the main verb.
39h.
  • Correlative conjunctions work in pairs to join words, phrases, or clauses.
  • The correlative conjunctions are either, or; neither, nor; both, and; not only, but also; whether, or.
Skills:
39. Students are able to:
  • Demonstrate correct standard English grammar and word usage in writing.
39a.
  • Identify pronouns in a sentence.
  • Evaluate sentences to determine if the correct case of the pronoun was used.
39b.
  • Identify inappropriate shifts in pronoun person in writing.
  • Identify inappropriate shifts in pronoun number in writing.
39c.
  • Use varied pronouns and their antecedents correctly in writing.
  • Revise writing to use a variety of pronouns and antecedents.
39d.
  • Write sentences with correct subject-verb agreement.
  • Revise writing to ensure all sentences have correct subject-verb agreement.
39e.
  • Use verb tenses to describe various times, sequences, states, and conditions in writing.
39f.
  • Identify inappropriate shifts in verb tense, including subject-verb agreement, in writing.
  • Correct inappropriate shifts in verb tense, including subject-verb agreement, in writing.
39g.
  • Use perfect verb tenses correctly in writing.
  • Revise writing for correct usage of perfect verb tenses.
39h.
  • Use correlative conjunctions correctly in writing.
  • Revise writing for correct usage of correlative conjunctions.
Understanding:
39. Students understand that:
  • Demonstrating command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing is necessary to convey meaning.
39a.
  • To clearly convey meaning in writing, the correct case of pronouns must be used.
39b.
  • A personal pronoun indicates the viewpoint of the writing and refers to the number of individuals.
  • To clearly communicate in writing, the correct pronoun number and person must be used.
39c.
  • To compose engaging writing pieces, they should use a variety of pronouns and antecedents.
  • Revising their writing can improve it and make it more interesting to read.
39d.
  • To clearly communicate in writing, subjects and verbs must agree in number within each sentence.
  • Revising their writing can ensure it follows standard English grammar conventions.
39e.
  • They can change the tense of verbs in writing to indicate various times, sequences, states, and conditions.
39f.
  • Standard English grammar conventions require specific and cohesive verb tense usage and subject-verb agreement in writing.
39g.
  • The perfect verb tense should be used for actions that are completed and finished.
  • A perfect verb tense is created by using a helping verb and the past participle of the main verb.
39h.
  • Correlative conjunctions can be used in writing to show a strong relationship between the ideas being joined.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 6
40. Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling when writing.

a. Use commas to separate items in a series, separate introductory elements from the rest of a sentence, set off tag questions, and indicate direct address.

b. Use underlining, quotation marks, or italics to indicate the titles of different types of works.

c. Spell grade-level words correctly, consulting references as needed.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
40.
  • Demonstrate
  • Command
  • Conventions
  • Standard English capitalization
  • Standard English punctuation
  • Standard English spelling
40a.
  • Commas
  • Series
  • Tag questions
  • Introductory elements
  • Direct address
40b.
  • Underlining
  • Quotation marks
  • Italics
40c.
  • References
Knowledge:
40. Students know:
  • Standard English spelling conventions.
  • Punctuation marks and their appropriate usage.
  • Capitalization rules for standard English.
40a.
  • Commas are used to separate groups of words.
  • Commas are used to separate introductory elements, which consist of phrases and words that appear before the main clause of the sentence.
  • A tag question is a question that is added at the end of a sentence; it consists of two basic elements: a verb and a pronoun.
  • A direct address means to direct a statement to a particular person, and a comma is used to separate the person's name from the rest of the sentence.
40b.
  • Underlining, quotation marks, and italics are used to indicate titles of creative works in writing.
40c.
  • Phonics skills necessary to spell words correctly.
  • Correct spellings can be located in reference materials, such as dictionaries.
Skills:
40. Students are able to:
  • Use correct capitalization in writing.
  • Use appropriate punctuation in writing.
  • Spell fifth-grade level words correctly.
40a.
  • Write sentences that correctly use commas to separate words in a series, such as cat, dog, turtle, etc.
  • Write sentences that correctly use a comma to separate introductory elements from the rest of a sentence, such as In the nighttime, people have a harder time driving.
  • Write sentences with tag questions with correct comma usage, such as She didn't forget to call you, did she?
  • Write sentences with direct addresses that correctly use a comma, such as Jackie, are you leaving so soon?
40b.
  • Use the correct indicator (underline, quotation marks, italics) when writing the titles of different types of works.
40c.
  • Spell grade-appropriate words correctly.
  • Consult references for correct spellings, if needed.
Understanding:
40. Students understand that:
  • When writing, they must use punctuation correctly, capitalize appropriate words, and spell fifth-grade level words correctly.
40a.
  • Commas are a common punctuation mark that are used for a variety of purposes.
40b.
  • Titles of work are identified differently, either with underlining, quotation marks, or italics.
40c.
  • To clearly communicate in writing, they must use correct spellings.
  • If they do not know how to spell a word, they can consult reference materials for assistance.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
41. Write using grade-appropriate general academic and domain-specific words and phrases accurately, including those that signal contrasting ideas, additional information, and other logical relationships.
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
41.
  • General academic words and phrases
  • Domain-specific words and phrases
  • Contrasting ideas
  • Additional information
  • Logical relationships
Knowledge:
41. Students know:
  • Academic vocabulary is language that is more formal than spoken language.
  • Domain-specific vocabulary refers to words that are used specifically in school subject areas, like math, science, and social studies.
  • Academic, domain-specific vocabulary should be used in writing.
  • Certain phrases can indicate that contrasting ideas, additional information, or logical relationships are being presented.
Skills:
41. Students are able to:
  • Use academic and domain-specific words and phrases in writing.
Understanding:
41. Students understand that:
  • It is important to use academic, domain-specific vocabulary in formal writing.
  • They can use certain words and phrases to indicate they are explaining contrasting ideas, adding further information, or signaling a relationship between concepts.
English Language Arts (2021)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 0
42. Consult print and digital reference materials to find the pronunciation and to determine or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases.

Examples: dictionaries, glossaries
Unpacked Content
Content Area:
Literacy Foundations
Focus Area:
Writing
Teacher Vocabulary:
42.
  • Print reference material
  • Digital reference material
  • Pronunciation
  • Clarify
  • Key words and phrases
Knowledge:
42. Students know:
  • Reference materials, such as dictionaries, can be used to find the proper pronunciations of key words and phrases.
  • Reference materials can also be used to learn or clarify the precise meaning of key words and phrases in writing.
Skills:
42. Students are able to:
  • Use print and digital reference materials to identify correct pronunciations of words and phrases.
  • Use print and digital reference materials to learn or clarify the precise meaning of words and phrases in writing.
Understanding:
42. Students understand that:
  • They have tools to help them determine the correct pronunciation and precise meaning of important words and phrases.