Courses of Study : Digital Literacy and Computer Science

Safety, Privacy, and Security
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R1) Identify, demonstrate, and apply personal safe use of digital devices.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • demonstrate personal safe use of technology.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to safely use digital devices.
  • that failure to use digital devices safely can have an impact on access at school as well as the protection of personal data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify personal safe use of digital devices.
  • demonstrate personal safe use of digital devices.
  • apply personal safe use of digital devices.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • it is important to protect personal data when sharing information on the internet.
Legal and Ethical Behavior
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R2) Recognize and demonstrate age-appropriate responsible use of digital devices and resources as outlined in school/district rules.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • demonstrate responsible use of age
  • appropriate digital devices and resources as outline in the school/district rules.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that schools/districts have rules in place to protect students.
  • that laws exist requiring schools to put measures in place to protect students.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify appropriate responsible use of digital devices found in the school/district rules.
  • demonstrate appropriate responsible use of digital devices.
  • communicate reasons for appropriate responsible use of digital devices found in the school/district rules.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • there are appropriate and inappropriate ways to use digital devices.
  • inappropriate use of devices has consequences in school and in the real world.
  • laws exist that require schools to monitor and/or censor internet access.
Impact of Computing
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R3) Assess the validity and identify the purpose of digital content.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify the validity and purpose of digital content.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • not all information found online is valid.
  • some information is shared online to promote an agenda.
  • all information has a purpose.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • assess the validity of digital content.
  • identify the purpose of digital content.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • not all information available digitally is accurate, valid, and/or unbiased.
  • some users/groups misrepresent information in an effort to skew perceptions.
Systems
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R4) Identify and employ appropriate troubleshooting techniques used to solve computing or connectivity issues.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • clear any cache or internet history.
  • complete disk checks or disk defrag.
  • complete a system restore or reset the device.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • troubleshooting
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • devices can present unintended behaviors, preventing normal operations.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • complete basic troubleshooting techniques that include clear any cache or internet history, complete disk checks or disk defrag, complete a system restore or reset the device.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • computing devices can and will fail at times.
  • it is important to save your work and know how to troubleshoot basic issues.
Collaborative Research
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R5) Locate and curate information from digital sources to answer research questions.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • locate and curate information from digital sources to answer given research questions.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • curate
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to find valid sources to answer a given research topic.
  • how to cite sources.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • locate valid digital resources to answer given research questions.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a great deal of information is available.
  • it is important to validate information and to cite the source of information.
Digital Tools
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 6
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
R6) Produce, review, and revise authentic artifacts that include multimedia using appropriate digital tools.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • produce a multimedia artifact.
  • review artifacts created by others.
  • revise an artifact based on peer or teacher feedback.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • feedback is important in a design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create a multimedia artifact.
  • critique the work of others.
  • revise their work based on feedback received.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • much like the writing process, design of a multimedia artifact nets the best results when creators have the opportunity to be given feedback and revise as needed.
Computational Thinker
Abstraction
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1) Decompose problems into component parts, extract key information, and develop descriptive models to understand the levels of abstractions in complex systems.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • decompose problems into component parts.
  • extract key details given in the problem.
  • develop descriptive models to outline the levels of abstraction in complex models.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • decompose
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • complex problems may be more easily processed when broken into simpler problems.
  • that it is important to highlight key details of a problem.
  • descriptive models can help outline the procedures to solve more complex problems.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • solve a complex problem by decomposing the problem into smaller, simpler problems.
  • extract key details needed in the problem
  • solving process.
  • develop descriptive models to convey the levels of abstraction in complex systems.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex problems may be easier to solve if they are broken into smaller problems first.
  • it is important to identify key details in the problem.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2) Explain how computing systems are often integrated with other systems and embedded in ways that may not be apparent to the user.

Examples: Millions of lines of code control the subsystems within an automobile (e.g., antilock braking systems, lane detection, and self-parking).

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain how computing systems are often integrated with other systems.
  • explain how computing systems can be embedded in ways that may not be apparent to the user.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that many electronic devices we encounter are comprised of multiple complex systems.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify examples of complex computing systems in everyday life.
  • explain how computing systems are often integrated with other systems and embedded in ways that may not be apparent to most users.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • complex computing systems exist that integrate computing systems with one another in ways that may not be apparent to the user.
Algorithms
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3) Differentiate between a generalized expression of an algorithm in pseudocode and its concrete implementation in a programming language.

a. Explain that some algorithms do not lead to exact solutions in a reasonable amount of time and thus approximations are acceptable.

b. Compare and contrast the difference between specific control structures such as sequential statements, conditional, iteration, and explain the benefits and drawbacks of choices made.

Examples: Tradeoffs involving implementation, readability, and program performance.

c. Distinguish when a problem solution requires decisions to be made among alternatives, such as selection constructs, or when a solution needs to be iteratively processed to arrive at a result, such as iterative 'loop' constructs or recursion.

d. Evaluate and select algorithms based on performance, reusability, and ease of implementation.

e. Explain how more than one algorithm may solve the same problem and yet be characterized with different priorities.

Examples: All self-driving cars have a common goal of taking a passenger to a designation but may have different priorities such as safety, speed, or conservation; web search engines have their own algorithms for search with their own priorities.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compare and contrast pseudocode and programming language.
  • be given pseudocode and code in a programming language to differentiate between the two processes.
a.
  • explain that some solutions cannot be reached in an acceptable timeframe, and therefore solutions must be approximated.
b.
  • identify sequential statements in code.
  • identify conditional statements in code.
  • identify iterations in code.
  • compare and contrast the difference between these types of control structures: sequential statements, conditional statements, and iteration.
  • identify trade-offs associated with using one control structure over another.
c.
  • identify when an iterative loop is needed in a program.
  • identify when selection constructs are needed in a program.
  • identify when recursion is needed in a program.
  • distinguish when a solution requires decisions to be made among alternatives such as an iterative loop, selection constructs, or recursion.
d.
  • evaluate algorithms based on performance.
  • evaluate algorithms based on reusability.
  • evaluate algorithms based on ease of implementation.
  • select the best algorithm based on desired strength: performance, reusability, or ease of implementation.
  • e.
    • explain that algorithms can be designed to operate for a specific priority.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • pseudocode
  • programming language
a.
  • approximated
b.
  • iteration
  • conditional statements
  • control structures
c.
  • iterative loop
  • selection constructs
  • recursion
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that differences exist in pseudocode and a programming language.
  • that programming languages have certain requirements for language and syntax.
a.
  • that some programs cannot return a result in a reasonable time frame, therefore approximations must be allowed in those cases.
b.
  • how to identify sequential statements, conditional statements, and/or iterations in code.
  • the differences between sequential statements, conditional statements, and/or iterations.
  • trade-offs exist with using one control structure over another.
c.
  • some decisions in a program will require the use of iterative loops, selection constructs, or recursion.
d.
  • programs can be written to satisfy a number of needs such as performance, reusability, and ease of implementation.
  • that most times, algorithms will differ based on the need of the program; performance, reusability, or ease of implementation.
e.
  • that programs can be written with specific priorities in mind.
  • that there are multiple correct ways to write a program.
  • that solutions are often chosen to meet the priority need of the program.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • distinguish between a generalized expression of an algorithm in pseudocode and its concrete implementation in a programming language.
  • point out similarities in vocabulary and syntax between pseudocode and an algorithm.
  • point out differences in vocabulary and syntax between pseudocode and an algorithm.
a.
  • explain that some algorithms do not lead to exact solutions in a reasonable amount of time and thus approximations are acceptable.
b.
  • identify sequential statements, conditional statements, and/or iterations in code.
  • identify tradeoffs associated with using one control structure over another.
c.
  • distinguish when a problem solution requires decisions to be made among alternatives or when a solution needs to be iteratively processed to arrive at a result.
d.
  • evaluate and select algorithms based on performance, reusability, and ease of implementation.
e.
  • explain how more than one algorithm may solve the same problem and yet be characterized with different priorities.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • similarities and differences exist in pseudocode and programming code.
  • some programming languages more closely resemble pseudocode than do other programming languages.
a.
  • due to time or financial constraints, some programs may return an approximation of a solution.
b.
  • both benefits and drawbacks exist when selecting one control structure over another in a code.
c.
  • programs can use multiple methods to arrive at a solution.
d.
  • there are times when a program needs to be selected for a specific purpose, such as performance, reusability, and/or ease of implementation.
e.
  • multiple algorithms can solve the same problem.
  • algorithms can operate with a specific priority in mind, such as speed, simplicity, and/or safety.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4) Use and adapt classic algorithms to solve computational problems.

Examples: Sorting, searching, shortest path, and data compression.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use classic algorithms to solve computational problems.
  • adapt classic algorithms to solve computational problems.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • classic algorithms exist that can be used and adapted to meet one's needs.
  • that it can be easier to alter code than to create it from scratch.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use and adapt classic algorithms to solve computational problems.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • algorithms can be altered to fit another use than originally designed for.
Programming and Development
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5) Design and iteratively develop computational artifacts for practical intent, personal expression, or to address a societal issue by using current events.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use digital tools to create content as it relates to current events.
  • seek feedback to revise computational artifacts.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts for practical intent.
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts for personal expression.
  • how to design and develop computational artifacts to address a societal issue by using current events.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and develop computational artifacts using an iterative design process.
  • use current events to bring merit to computational artifacts.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • design should be an iterative process whereby the designer seeks feedback to improve upon his/her creation.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6) Decompose problems into smaller components through systematic analysis, using constructs such as procedures, modules, and/or objects, with parameters, and which return a result.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • decompose a problem into smaller components.
  • abstract a process into simpler processes which one defines through programming.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • parameters
  • procedures
  • modules
  • objects
  • control structures
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • removing unessential details can make a process simpler.
  • control structures can assist in programming decisions.
  • how to create a program that returns a result.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • decompose a problem.
  • create a program that returns a result.
  • implement control structures.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • removing unessential details can make a process simpler.
  • control structures can assist in programming decisions.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7) Compare and contrast fundamental data structures and their uses.

Examples: Strings, lists, arrays, stacks, queues.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compare and contrast fundamental data structures and their uses.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • data structures
  • arrays
  • stacks
  • queues
  • list
  • strings
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • when to include varying types of data structures into a program to achieve a desired result.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • compare and contrast fundamental data structures and their uses.
  • properly use varying types of data structures in a program to achieve a desired result.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • data structures organize data for ease of recall.
  • data structures differ by organization structure and purpose.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8) Demonstrate code reuse by creating programming solutions using libraries and Application Programming Interfaces.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create code that includes commands and programs found in coding libraries or APIs.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • code
  • programming languages
  • Application Programming Interfaces
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to design a programming application that reuses code from programming libraries and code created in previous applications.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • reuse code from previous applications, code libraries, or APIs to reduce coding workload.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • reuse of code can be time
  • saving.
  • code may be written and shared in code libraries or may be accessible as an API.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9) Demonstrate the ability to verify the correctness of a program.

a. Develop and use a series of test cases to verify that a program performs according to its design specifications.

b. Collaborate in a code review process to identify correctness, efficiency, scalability and readability of program code.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • apply the problem
  • solving process to a program to verify the correctness of the program.
a.
  • develop test cases to verify the performance of a program.
  • apply test cases to verify the performance of a program.
b.
  • identify correctness of program code while collaborating in a code review process.
  • identify efficiency of program code while collaborating in a code review process.
  • identify scalability of program code while collaborating in a code review process.
  • identify readability of program code while collaborating in a code review process.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compile
  • program
  • syntax
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • proper syntax and formatting for a coding language.
  • how to identify coding errors in a programming language.
a.
  • programs must be tested to verify that the desired task is executed properly.
  • testing a program requires a scenario where you can easily verify that the result of the program is correct/accurate.
b.
  • a program can contain one of the following properties, but not be an appropriate program: correctness, efficiency, scalability and readability
  • it is important to have others review your code.
  • that to be a quality program, code must be correct, efficient, scalable and readable.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • analyze code for proper syntax and formatting.
a.
  • create a test case with verifiable results.
  • execute a program with the created test case to verify program performance.
  • locate errors in programming by executing test cases.
b.
  • work with others to review their code for correctness, efficiency, scalability and readability.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • programming languages each have their own required formatting which must be adhered to for a program to run correctly.
  • errors in programming languages prevent the program from executing its task.
  • each language has its own syntax and method for identifying potential errors.
a.
  • code can be formatted correctly and a program can still produce unintended results.
  • a test case is vital to verifying that a program is executing a task as intended.
b.
  • to be a quality program, code must be correct, efficient, scalable and readable.
  • it is important to have others proofread your code.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10) Resolve or debug errors encountered during testing using iterative design process.

Examples: Test for infinite loops, check for bad input, check edge-cases.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • troubleshoot errors encountered during testing using an iterative design process.
  • resolve or debug errors encountered during testing using an iterative design process.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • debug
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • steps of the problem solving process.
  • how to identify errors in an iterative design process.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • review a process and identify errors in procedure.
  • rectify errors found in a process.
  • test resolution to verify that the process now runs as intended.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • errors in a process can prevent a solution.
  • resolving an error will allow the process to function as intended.
Citizen of a Digital Culture
Safety, Privacy, and Security
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11) Model and demonstrate behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.

a. Recognize user tracking methods and hazards.

Examples: Cookies, WiFi packet sniffing.

b. Understand how to apply techniques to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.

c. Understand the ramifications of end-user license agreements and terms of service associated with granting rights to personal data and media to other entities.

d. Explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.

Examples: Convenience and accessibility, data mining, digital marketing, online wallets, theft of personal information.

e. Identify physical, legal, and ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.

Examples: Cyberbullying/harassment, inappropriate sexual communications.

f. Explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • model behaviors that are safe, legal, and ethical while living, learning, and working in an interconnected digital world.
a.
  • be able to identify user tracking methods and hazards.
b.
  • present strategies to mitigate effects of user tracking methods.
c.
  • explain how end-user license agreements and terms of service agreements serve to protect corporations not individuals.
  • explain the ramifications that may exist when one enters into a end-user licensing agreement or terms of use agreement.
  • explain how personal data may be shared by permissions agreed to in terms of service or end-user license agreements.
d.
  • explain online privacy.
  • explain personal security.
  • explain the relationship between online privacy and personal security.
e.
  • identify physical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify legal consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify ethical consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify impacts of negative digital behaviors.
  • explain strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
  • assess when to apply various strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • ethics
  • digital world
a.
    cookies
  • virus
  • malware
  • packet sniffing
  • spyware
  • phishing
b.
  • browser history
c.
  • personal data
d.
    data mining
  • digital marketing
  • online wallets
  • personal information
  • data accessibility
  • passwords.
e.
  • cyberbullying
  • harassment
  • sexual communication
f.
  • online safety
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • safe, legal, and ethical behaviors for online behavior.
a.
  • tracking methods are often used to improve digital tools and advertising.
  • hazards exist when unknown entities have access to a user's digital habits.
b.
  • methods to counteract the use of tracking.
c.
  • that often, end-user licensing agreements (EULA) are often written to protect the entity that created the digital tool, rather than the user of the digital tool.
  • that EULAs and terms of service agreements can grant access to the user's personal data.
  • that personal data can include images, posts, personal information (phone number, address, birth date, access to friends), and browsing data.
d.
  • often there exists an inverse relationship between online privacy/personal security and convenience.
e.
  • that inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
f.
  • that negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • that some behaviors are illegal.
  • strategies to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors and assess when to apply them.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • interact digitally while exercising safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • identify tracking methods used to gather data.
  • identify hazards that exist when tracking methods are used.
b.
  • list techniques to avoid tracking.
  • apply techniques to avoid tracking.
c.
  • interpret the terms of EULAs and terms of service agreements.
  • make an educated decision to agree to EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • weigh the risks of using a digital tool to one's personal security.
  • identify potential risks to using various digital tools.
  • evaluate a digital tool's security.
e.
  • identify inappropriate digital behaviors.
  • identify consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors.
f.
  • identify negative digital behaviors.
  • share strategies to to lessen the impact of negative digital behaviors.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • because the Internet can be such a persisting environment, it is vital to interact with safe, legal, and ethical behaviors.
a.
  • entities use tracking methods to make products more appealing to their users.
  • hazards exists when tracking data can be tied to individual users.
b.
  • privacy can be violated when tracking is used.
  • techniques exist to mitigate the effects of tracking methods.
c.
  • nothing is free—you often give up data to use digital resources for no charge.
  • it is important to educate yourself on EULAs and terms of service agreements.
d.
  • free digital tools can compromise one's privacy and security.
  • it is important to be aware of what one is trading for use of a service.
e.
  • inappropriate digital behavior can have physical, legal, and ethical consequences.
  • consequences of inappropriate digital behaviors can have life-altering consequences.
f.
  • digital identity is tied to online digital behavior.
  • negative digital behaviors can have lasting consequences.
  • some digital activity is illegal.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12) Describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain how malware works.
  • describe how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.
Teacher Vocabulary:
personal data, malware, cyber attacks
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how malware works.
  • how sensitive data can be affected by malware and other attacks.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify when a computer issue is potentially caused by malware.
  • remove malware from a computing device.
  • explain ways to protect computing devices from malware.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • malware is harmful to computing devices and personal data.
  • software exists to remove malware from computing devices.
  • software exists to protect computing devices from a malware attack.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13) Compare various security measures of a computer system.

Examples: Usability, security, portability, and scalability.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify security measures of a computer system.
  • compare various security measures of a computer system.
Teacher Vocabulary:
Cyber security, computer systems
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify security measures of a computing system.
  • how to evaluate usability, security, portability, or scalability of the security measures of a computing system.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify security measures of a computing system.
  • evaluate usability, security, portability, or scalability of the security measures of a computing system.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • Usability, security, portability, or scalability are important features of computer security measures.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14) Compare ways to protect devices, software, and data.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • compare ways to protect devices.
  • compare ways to protect software.
  • compare ways to protect data.
Teacher Vocabulary:
computing devices, software, and data
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that it is important to protect data, software, and devices.
  • why it is important to protect data, software, and devices.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • compare ways to protect devices.
  • compare ways to protect software.
  • compare ways to protect data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • multiple methods exist to protect data, software, and devices.
  • some methods are more effective than others at meeting specific criteria.
  • it is important to evaluate option for protection of data, software, and devices.
Legal and Ethical Behavior
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15) Explain the necessity for the school's Acceptable Use Policy.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain the necessity of the school's technology Acceptable Use Policy.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Acceptable Use Policy (AUP)
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that accesses to resources such as devices and Internet often require parameters of appropriate use.
  • an AUP identifies the boundaries within which technology is to be used.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • articulate the boundaries of the AUP.
  • explain the necessity of any entity to establish an AUP.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • accesses to resources such as devices and Internet often require parameters of appropriate use.
  • an AUP identifies the boundaries within which technology is to be used.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16) Identify laws regarding the use of technology and their consequences and implications.

Examples: Unmanned vehicles, net neutrality/common carriers, hacking, intellectual property, piracy, plagiarism.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • net neutrality
  • hacking
  • intellectual property
  • piracy plagiarism
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify consequences of violating laws relative to the use of technology.
  • identify implications of laws relative to the use of technology.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • technology changes at a rapid rate.
  • all things that are possible with technology may not be ethical.
  • that laws exist or are created to encourage individuals and entities to operate in an ethical manner.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17) Discuss the ethical ramifications of malicious hacking and its impact on society.

Examples: Dissemination of privileged information, ransomware.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • discuss malicious hacking.
  • discuss ethical ramifications of malicious hacking.
  • discuss the impacts on society of malicious hacking.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • white hat hacking
  • black hat hacking
  • information
  • ransomware
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that not all people use technology in a legal or ethical manner.
  • that software and processes are created to elicit personal data for negative purposes.
  • that the negative behaviors associated with technology have impacts on society.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify malicious hacking.
  • discuss ethical ramifications of malicious hacking.
  • discuss the impacts on society of malicious hacking.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • that not all people use technology in a legal or ethical manner.
  • that software and processes are created to elicit personal data for negative purposes.
  • that the negative behaviors associated with technology have impacts on society.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
18) Explain the beneficial and harmful effects that intellectual property laws can have on innovation.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify intellectual property laws.
  • explain beneficial effects that intellectual property laws have on innovation.
  • explain harmful effects that intellectual property laws have on innovation.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • intellectual property
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that intellectual property laws are meant to protect the creator or artifacts.
  • that intellectual property laws allow for varying degrees of use of a work.
  • that stealing another person's intellectual property can rob that person of an opportunity to generate income from that artifact.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify intellectual property laws.
  • explain beneficial effects that intellectual property laws have on innovation.
  • explain harmful effects that intellectual property laws have on innovation.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • intellectual property laws are meant to protect the creator or artifacts.
  • intellectual property laws allow for varying degrees of use of a work.
  • stealing another person's intellectual property can rob that person of an opportunity to generate income from that artifact.
Digital Identity
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
19) Prove that digital identity is a reflection of persistent, publicly available artifacts.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research implications of irresponsible digital postings.
  • correlate online postings to one's digital identity.
  • argue that digital identity is a reflection of online content that is tied to a person.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital identity
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • what data can be found about a person on the internet.
  • people can judge a person based on the Internet postings attached to his/her digital identity.
  • inappropriate postings can have lasting consequences.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • research implications of irresponsible digital postings.
  • correlate online postings to one's digital identity.
  • argue that digital identity is a reflection of online content that is tied to a person.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • school personnel, people, and future employers may judge you based on online content before ever meeting you in person.
  • it is important to be proactive about what data is available online.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
20) Evaluate strategies to manage digital identity and reputation with awareness of the permanent impact of actions in a digital world.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research the impacts of actions taken in a digital environment.
  • evaluate strategies to protect their reputation in a digital environment.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • digital identity
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that often individuals are judged by their publicly visible online presence prior to meeting people in person.
  • that strategies exist to manage what is publicly posted online about you.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify both positive and negative posts online.
  • identify consequences associated with negative online posting.
  • manage their digital identity and minimize negative repercussions.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • data posted online may not remain private.
  • all data shared online will have some impact on one's digital identity.
  • one must be mindful of the data attached to one's digital identity.
Impact of Computing
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
21) Explain how technology facilitates the disruption of traditional institutions and services.

Examples: Digital currencies, ridesharing, autonomous vehicles, retail, Internet of Things.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain the impact of technology of traditional institutions and services.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • uber
  • rideshare
  • digital currencies
  • retail
  • college
  • university
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that is important to assess the economic impact of technology on tradition institutions and services.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify technology changes in everyday life that have changed how people interact with the world (example: music on CD and radio
  • > streaming music services like Spotify and XM satellite radio).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • technology changes quickly in an attempt to improve the quality and efficiency of life but may cause some disruptions as transitions to new methods take place.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
22) Research the impact of computing technology on possible career pathways.

Examples: Government, business, medicine, entertainment, education, transportation.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research the impacts of computing technologies on possible career paths.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • computing technology
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • computing technology can impact careers both positively and negatively.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • recognize that changes in technology will affect future career opportunities (examples: taxi cabs vs. ride sharing; self-driving vehicles vs. over
  • the
  • road trucking; change in space needed at colleges as students transition to online courses).
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • being mindful of changes in technology can make one aware of potential changes in future industry.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
23) Debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal, ethical, social, economic, and cultural spheres.

Examples: Artificial Intelligence/machine learning, mobile applications, automation of traditional occupational skills.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in personal spheres.
  • debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in ethical spheres.
  • debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in social spheres.
  • debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in economic spheres.
  • debate the positive and negative effects of computing innovations in cultural spheres.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • innovation
  • ethics
  • social
  • economic
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to discuss positive and negative effects of computing innovations in multiple contexts.
  • that changes in computing innovations can have a range of effects in many contexts.
  • how to communicate their beliefs about computing innovations and the effects caused by advances.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • recognize that innovations can have both positive and negative consequences.
  • identify positive and negative effects of innovation.
  • communicate support for or against innovation.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • advancements can also have drawbacks.
  • we are in a state of change that will require adaptation and education to be a constant.
Global Collaborator
Creative Communication
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
24) Compare and contrast Internet publishing platforms, including suitability for media types, target audience, and feedback mechanism.

a. Apply version control capabilities within a digital tool to understand the importance of managing historical changes across suggestions made by a collaborative team.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify Internet publishing platforms.
  • identify media types.
  • identify target audience.
  • identify feedback mechanism.
  • compare and contrast internet publishing platforms and the suitability for specific media types, target audiences, and feedback mechanisms.
a.
  • track changes made by a collaborative team over time within a digital tool.
  • explain importance of tracking and managing historical changes within a digital tool.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • Internet publishing platform
  • digital publishing platform
  • e-publishing
  • media types
  • target audience
  • feedback mechanism
a.
  • version control system
  • revision control
  • source control
  • timestamp
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to evaluate Internet publishing platforms for computer, tablet, and mobile experiences.
  • how to determine suitability of Internet publishing platforms for different media types.
  • how to determine suitability of Internet publishing platforms for different target audiences.
  • how to determine suitability of Internet publishing platforms for different feedback mechanisms.
a.
  • tracking historical changes is essential for software development, particularly where a collaborative team is working with the same files.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify suitable Internet publishing platforms for different media types, target audiences, and feedback mechanisms.
  • explain the pros and cons of different Internet publishing platforms for various media types, target audiences, and feedback mechanisms.
a.
  • use version control capabilities within a digital tool.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • for effective communications, different Internet publishing platforms are needed for different media types, target audience, and feedback mechanisms.
a.
  • version control capabilities allows for tracking changes in software and provides the ability to revert to a previous version.
Digital Tools
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
25) Utilize a variety of digital tools to create digital artifacts across content areas.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use digital tools to create digital artifacts across content areas.
  • seek and use feedback to revise digital artifacts.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use a variety of digital tools.
  • how to use a digital tool to create a digital artifact.
  • the appropriate use of digital tools and artifacts for specific content areas.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use a variety of digital tools.
  • create digital artifacts using a variety of digital tools.
  • appropriately match digital artifacts and content areas for effective communication.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • digital tools are used to create digital artifacts that can be used for effective communication of competency across content areas.
Collaborative Research
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
26) Use collaborative technologies to work with others including peers, experts, or community members to examine local, national, and global issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use collaborative technologies (i.e., videoconferencing, collaboration software, interactive displays, etc.) to work with others while examining local, national and global issues from multiple viewpoints.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • collaborative technologies
  • collaboration software
  • collaboration apps
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use collaborative technologies.
  • how to work effectively as a team member in a collaborative setting.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use collaborative technologies.
  • work with peers, experts, or community members in a team setting using collaborative technologies.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • collaborative technologies are helpful, and often necessary, to work effectively in teams of peers, experts, community members, etc.
  • , to examine local, national and global issues and problems from multiple viewpoints.
Social Interactions
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
27) Apply tools and methods for collaboration on a project to increase connectivity among people in different cultures and career fields.

Examples: Collaborative documents, webinars, teleconferencing, and virtual fieldtrips

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • use collaborative tools and methods to complete a project with at least one aspect concerning career fields and/or different cultures.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • collaborative tools
  • collaborative methods
  • connectivity
  • asynchronous or synchronous conferencing
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to use collaborative tools and methods for appropriate and effective connectivity when completing a collaborative project.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • select, utilize and manage collaborative tools and methods on a project involving team members from a different culture and/or career fields.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • collaborative tools and methods can be utilized on projects to increase connectivity among people from different cultures and career fields.
  • increasing connectivity provides for multiple viewpoints and thoroughness of the completed project.
Computing Analyst
Data
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
28) Develop a model that reflects the methods, procedures and concepts used by computing devices in translating digital bits as real-world phenomena, such as print characters, sound, images, and video.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • develop a model that demonstrates a method used by computing devices to translate digital bits as real-world phenomena.
  • develop a model that demonstrates a procedure used by computing devices to translate digital bits as real-world phenomena.
  • develop a model that demonstrates a concept used by computing devices to translate digital bits as real-world phenomena.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • computing devices use methods, procedures, and concepts to translate digital bits from an abstract form into real-world phenomena such as sound, images, etc.
  • each device has a process for translating from computational information to real-world phenomena.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • model the translation of digital information to real-world phenomena.
  • understand that this process is that way in which computing devices and humans interact.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • for computing devices to communicate in a way in which humans understand, there is a process (methods, procedures, and concepts) used to translate computational information to real-world phenomena.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
29) Summarize the role of compression and encryption in modifying the structure of digital artifacts and the varieties of information carried in the metadata of these artifacts.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • summarize the roles of compression and encryption.
  • examine how the structure of digital artifacts may be modified when compressed or encrypted.
  • describe the effects on the metadata of an artifact when compressing or encrypting the file.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • compression
  • encryption
  • metadata
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that when a file is altered in any way, changes may be seen in the file metadata.
  • compression and encryption are two methods used when sharing data.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the roles of compression and encryption.
  • summarize the effects of compression and encryption on the metadata of a digital artifact.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • any process applied to data has the potential to alter the structure of the data.
  • it is important to be aware of potential changes to data structure when electing to use a process.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
30) Evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.

Examples: Client server, peer-to-peer, cloud computing.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • research methods of data organization and storage.
  • examine advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
  • evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • client server
  • peer-to-peer
  • cloud computing
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that many options exist for the storage and organization of data.
  • that selecting one storage option over another will have both advantages and disadvantages.
  • that it is important to understand the tradeoffs involved with selecting one method over another.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • research methods of data organization and storage.
  • examine advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
  • evaluate the tradeoffs involved in choosing methods for the organization of data elements and the location of data storage, including the advantages and disadvantages of networked computing.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • how and where data is stored can affect how the data is accessed and/or processed.
  • how and where data is stored can affect the safety of that data.
  • it is important to carefully weigh how and where data is stored.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
31) Create interactive data visualizations using software tools to help others understand real-world phenomena.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • collect data to depict real-world phenomena.
  • create displays to share collected data.
  • create interactive data visualizations using software tools to help others understand real-world phenomena.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • data can be communicated with visual representations.
  • tools exists to share data via interactive visualizations.
  • how to create interactive visualizations to represent real-world phenomena.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • gather data.
  • share data using an interactive visualization tool.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • visualizations of data can be much more powerful than a database full of numbers.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
32) Use data analysis tools and techniques to identify patterns in data representing complex systems.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify patterns in data.
  • use data analysis tools and techniques.
  • use data analysis tools and techniques to identify patterns in data representing complex systems.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • datamining
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify patterns in data.
  • how to select and apply data analysis tools and techniques.
  • use data analysis tools and techniques to identify patterns in data representing complex systems.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • evaluate data sets.
  • select and apply data analysis tools and techniques.
  • use technology to mine data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • data can be important in a problem
  • solving process.
  • tools exists to aid in the processing of complex data sets.
  • it can be more efficient to allow a program to identify patterns in a complex data set.
Systems
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
33) Evaluate the scalability and reliability of networks by describing the relationship between routers, switches, servers, topology, packets, or addressing, as well as the issues that impact network functionality.

Examples: Bandwidth, load, delay.

a. Explain the purpose of Internet Protocol addresses and how domain names are resolved to IP addresses through a Domain Name System server.

b. Understand the need for networking protocols and examples of common protocols.

Examples: HTTP, SMTP, and FTP

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • describe scalability and reliability of networks.
  • evaluate scalability and reliability of networks by describing the relationships of routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing.
  • discuss issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • explain the purpose of Internet Protocol (IP) addresses.
  • explain the use of a Domain Name System (DNS) server.
  • explain how the DNS server resolves the domain name to the IP address.
b.
  • explain the significance of network protocols.
  • identify examples of networking protocols.
  • explain the uses of and basic differences between various networking protocols.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • scalability
  • reliability
  • bandwidth
  • load
  • delay
  • fault tolerance
  • redundancy
  • latency
a.
  • domain name
  • Domain Name System (DNS) server
  • IP address
  • DNS name resolution
b.
  • networking protocols
  • layers
  • packets
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing affect scalability and reliability of networks.
  • how to describe the issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • that the DNS server function is to turn a user
  • friendly domain name into an IP address that machines use to identify each other on a network.
  • that the DNS server manages a database that maps domain names to IP addresses.
  • the typical format of an IP address.
  • computers communicate the IP address in binary form.
b.
  • that networking protocols are formal standards and policies that include procedures, formats and rules the define how two or more devices will communicate over a network.
  • there are several broad types of networking protocols including network communication protocols such as TCP/IP and HTTP, networking security protocols such as HTTPS and SSL, and network management protocols such as SNMP and ICMP.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • describe the relationships of routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing.
  • describe scalability and reliability of networks.
  • describe issues that impact network functionality.
a.
  • explain the purpose of IP addresses.
  • identify what a typical IP address look like.
  • explain the difference between IP addresses expressed in decimal format and binary format.
  • explain how domain names are resolved to IP addresses through a DNS server.
b.
  • explain the significance of networking protocols.
  • provide examples of common networking protocols.
  • explain the uses of different networking protocols.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • scalability and reliability of networks are dependent on relationships between routers, switches, servers, network topology, packets, and IP addressing, etc.
  • network functionality is impacted by bandwidth, load, delay, latency, firewalls, server capacity, etc.
a.
  • an Internet Protocol address is a unique identifying number for every machine on the internet.
  • the DNS server manages a massive database that maps user
  • friendly domain names to an IP address.
b.
  • networking protocols are needed to define rules for communication between network devices.
  • networking protocols include Internet protocols (IP, TCP, HTTP, FTP, SMTP, etc.), wireless network protocols (Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, LTE), and network routing protocols (OSPF, BGP, etc.).
  • networking security protocols, such as HTTPS and SSL, provide security over network communications.
  • network management protocols, such as SNMP and ICMP, provide network governance and maintenance.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
34) Categorize the roles of operating system software.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • describe the purpose of operating system software.
  • identify the responsibilities of operating system software (i.e., manages memory, manages data storage and I/O devices, contains common code that applications can use).
  • explain the different types of operating systems software (i.e., single- and multi-tasking, single
  • and multi-user, distributed, templated, real-time, etc.).
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • operating system software
  • interface
  • I/O (input/output)
  • memory
  • data storage
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • the responsibilities of operating system software.
  • that operating system software provides an interface between the user and applications and I/O devices.
  • that operating system software is specific to the purpose of the software.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain the purpose of operating system software.
  • list the responsibilities of operating system software.
  • identify types of operating system software.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • operating system software provides an interface between the user and hardware and programs/applications.
  • operating system software is the most fundamental of all system software programs.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
35) Appraise the role of artificial intelligence in guiding software and physical systems.

Examples: predictive modeling, self-driving cars.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify pros and cons of artificial intelligence in guiding software and physical systems.
  • evaluate the value of artificial intelligence in guiding software and physical systems.

  • Examples: predictive modeling, self-driving cars
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • artificial intelligence
  • machine learning
  • physical systems
  • guiding software
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • artificial intelligence plays a role in all industries from healthcare to automotive and finance to military.
  • there are philosophical and ethical questions related to artificial intelligence.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • research the roles that artificial intelligence have in guiding software and physical systems.
  • describe ethical and philosophical issues of artificial intelligence roles in society.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • there are positive and negative aspects to the science of artificial intelligence and how it is applied in industries, science, and society.
  • ethical, moral, and philosophical issues must continually be evaluated as artificial intelligence grows in application.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
36) Explain the tradeoffs when selecting and implementing cybersecurity recommendations.

Examples: Two-factor authentication, password requirements, geolocation requirements.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • explain the tradeoffs when selecting and implementing cybersecurity recommendations.
  • describe pros and cons of two factor authentication (TFA).
  • describe the importance of password requirements.
  • describe the use of geolocation requirements.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • cybersecurity
  • two-factor authentication (TFA)
  • geolocation
  • privacy
  • cryptography
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to evaluate the tradeoffs of cybersecurity recommendations.
  • how to articulate the pros and cons of TFA.
  • the importance of password requirements.
  • how to articulate the pros and cons of geolocation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • explain pros and cons of cybersecurity recommendations.
  • describe the use of two-factor authentication.
  • explain the importance of password requirements.
  • describe the use of geolocation.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • security, privacy and convenience tradeoffs are factors in selecting and implementing cybersecurity recommendations.
Modeling and Simulation
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
37) Evaluate the ability of models and simulations to test and support the refinement of hypotheses.

a. Create and utilize models and simulations to help formulate, test, and refine a hypothesis.

b. Form a model of a hypothesis, testing the hypothesis by the collection and analysis of data generated by simulations.

Examples: Science lab, robotics lab, manufacturing, space exploration.

c. Explore situations where a flawed model provided an incorrect answer.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • evaluate how models and simulations can be used to examine theories and test and support the refinement of hypotheses.
  • explain how predictions and inferences are affected by large and complex data sets, quality of inputs, and software and hardware used.
a.
  • create a model or simulation to formulate, test, and refine a hypothesis.
  • utilize a model or simulation to formulate, test, and refine a hypothesis.
b.
  • form a model of a hypothesis.
  • test a hypothesis by the collection and analysis of data generated by simulations.
c.
  • be given a flawed model and explore reasons that the outcomes are not as expected or intended.
Teacher Vocabulary:
  • model
  • simulations
  • hypotheses
  • phenomena
  • target system
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to explain the use of models and simulations to generate new knowledge and understanding related to the phenomena or target system that is being studied.
  • how to explain the ability of models and simulations to test and support the refinement of hypotheses related to phenomena under consideration.
a.
  • that modeling and simulations are way to extrapolate and interpolate unrest situation and scenarios to help formulate, test and refine hypotheses.
b.
  • how to form a hypothesis.
  • how to test a hypothesis.
  • how to create a model or simulation.
c.
  • that simulations or models can be created to test a hypothesis but not provide the information expected or intended.
  • that it is vital to verify the data being generated by a model or simulation.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • use a diagram or program to represent a model to express key properties of a phenomena or target system.
  • research existing models and simulations and how they are used to test and refine hypotheses.
  • explain how existing models and simulations are used to test and support the refinement of hypotheses.
a.
  • create a model or simulation to formulate, test, and refine a hypothesis.
  • utilize a model or simulation to formulate, test, and refine a hypothesis.
b.
  • form a model of a hypothesis.
  • test the hypothesis by collecting and analyzing data from a simulation.
c.
  • examine a model or simulation to determine the correctness of the generated data.
  • examine a flawed model or simulation and identify areas in which it is providing incorrect data.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • a simulation is based on a model and enables observation of the system as key properties change.
  • the accuracy of models and simulations are limited by the level of detail and quality of information used and the software and hardware used.
  • models and simulations are an effective and cost efficient way to understand phenomena and test and refine hypotheses.
a.
  • models and simulations are way to extrapolate and interpolate unrest situation and scenarios to help formulate, test and refine hypotheses.
  • models and simulations can be the only cost- ot time-effective way to test a hypothesis.
b.
  • Models and simulations can save money, are safer, usually requires less time, and do not have the environmental impact that a full experiment or operational test may induce.
c.
  • while a process may operate without errors, that does not guarantee that the process is providing accurate data to meet your needs.
Innovative Designer
Human/Computer Partnerships
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
38) Systematically design and develop programs for broad audiences by incorporating feedback from users.
Examples: Games, utilities, mobile applications.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • design programs iteratively, with feedback from users.
  • develop programs iteratively, with feedback from users.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • it is vital to seek feedback from others on programs and products.
  • feedback can help make a program or product better.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • design and develop a program.
  • publish a program, seeking feedback.
  • make edits to a program based upon user feedback.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • when designing a program, it is important to receive input from your target audience to ensure your product meets their expectations or need.
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
39) Identify a problem that cannot be solved by either humans or machines alone and discuss a solution for it by decomposing the task into sub-problems suited for a human or machine to accomplish.

Examples: Forecasting weather, piloting airplanes.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • identify a problem that cannot be solved by humans or machines alone.
  • discuss possible solutions using decomposition.
  • identify subproblems for either a human or machine to solve.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • how to identify a problem.
  • how to decompose a problem.
  • how to identify possible solutions to a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • identify a problem that cannot be solved by humans or machines alone.
  • discuss possible solutions using decomposition.
  • identify subproblems for either a human or machine to solve.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • problems exist that cannot be solved by a human or machine alone.
  • identifying subproblems can make a complex problem easier to solve.
  • humans and machines can work together to solve complex problems.
Design Thinking
Digital Literacy and Computer Science (2018)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Unit Plans: 0
40) Use an iterative design process, including learning from mistakes, to gain a better understanding of a problem domain.

Insight Unpacked Content
Evidence of Student Attainment:
Students will:
  • create, publish, seek feedback on, and revise artifacts.
Knowledge:
Students know:
  • that creating an artifact is an iterative process.
  • that feedback serves to make products better.
  • that mistakes are teaching tools that help determine how not to solve a problem.
Skills:
Students are able to:
  • create and publish.
  • process constructive feedback.
  • persevere through mistakes.
Understanding:
Students understand that:
  • creating an artifact is an iterative process.
  • feedback serves to make products better.
  • mistakes are teaching tools that help determine how not to solve a problem.