Courses of Study

Creating
Envision, Conceptualize
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1) Create roles, imagined worlds, and improvised stories in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Envision, Conceptualize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre Artists rely on intuition, curiosity and critical inquiry.
EQ: What happens when Theatre artists use their imagination and/or learned theatre skills while engaging in creative exploration and inquiry?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2) Explore and articulate ideas for costumes, props, and sets for the environment and characters in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Envision, Conceptualize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre Artists rely on intuition, curiosity and critical inquiry.
EQ: What happens when Theatre artists use their imagination and/or learned theatre skills while engaging in creative exploration and inquiry?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Develop
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3) Collaborate to determine how characters might move and speak to support the story and given circumstances in drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4) Participate in methods of investigation to devise original ideas for a drama/theatre work.

Example: Interview a grandparent to create a monologue from the perspective of someone born in another time period.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5) Compare ideas with peers and make selections that will enhance and deepen group drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Rehearse
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6) Collaborate with peers to revise, refine, and adapt ideas to fit the given parameters of a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7) Participate in and contribute to physical and vocal exploration in an improvised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8) Practice and refine design and technical choices to support a devised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • 6 journalistic questions: (who, what, when, where, why)
  • peers

Analysis
  • levels
  • setting
  • real
  • imaginary
  • constructive criticism
Voice
  • speed
  • pitch
  • volume
Movement
  • improvise
  • gesture
  • tableau
Characterization
  • motivation
Directing
Design
  • sets
  • props
Theatrical production
  • collaborate
  • polish
  • rehearse
Skill Examples:
  • Brainstorm ideas for roles, imaginary worlds, and stories.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for costumes for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for props for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for sets for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate ideas for setting for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explore and articulate characters for an improvised dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might move in the dramatic/ theatrical work. Use high, medium, and low levels made by crouching, crawling, leaping, stretching to reach something high, etc.
  • Collaborate to determine how characters might speak in the dramatic/ theatrical work by improvising dialogue and the specific traits of various characters' voices (i.e., pitch, speed, volume).
  • Determine what the given circumstances are of a character in a dramatic/ theatrical work which include the elements that affect a character: his personal situation, the setting, events that are related to the character or historical period, and the character's motivation.
  • Use different methods (i.e., improvisational theater games, research) to devise original ideas for dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Compare ideas with peers.
  • Make choices with peers that will improve and deepen the group's dramatic/ theatrical work through the use of constructive criticism.
  • Collaborate with the group to fit within the parameters of the dramatic/ theatrical work. Staging choices may vary (i.e., Reader's Theater use of tableau, etc.).
  • Collaborate with peers to polish the group work to fit the parameters of the work.
  • Participate in vocal exploration (perhaps by using vocal exercises and theater games) in improvised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Make design choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Make technical choices to support a improvised or scripted work.
  • Practice and refine or polish the design and technical choices for a devised or scripted dramatic/ theatrical work.
Performing
Select
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9) Apply the elements of dramatic structure to a story and create a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
Process Components: Select
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists make strong choices to effectively convey meaning.
EQ: Why are strong choices essential to interpreting a drama or theatre piece?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • reflection
Analysis
  • plot
  • dialogue
  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • resolution
Voice
  • pitch
  • volume
  • tone
  • relaxation
  • breathing
  • articulation
Movement
  • posture
  • facial expression
  • gestures
Characterization
Directing
Design
  • scenery
  • costumes
  • makeup
  • props
Theatrical production
  • concentration
  • recall
  • technical elements
Skill Examples:
  • Identify parts (see Freytag's pyramid) or other formats for dramatic plot structure and be able to identify examples of conflict in dialogue or short scenes.
  • Apply and use the elements of dramatic structure to create a dramatic/ theatrical work by mapping out a scene around some central conflict.
  • Investigate how movement is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through posture, facial expression, and gesture.
  • Investigate how voice is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through pitch, volume, and tone.
  • Participate in various physical exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to enhance expressiveness of movement and working as part of a group.
  • Participate in various vocal exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to work on relaxation, breathing, and articulation.
  • Participate in emotional/ mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work, especially exercises that enhance concentration and recall.
  • Identify technical elements that are used in a dramatic/ theatrical work including scenery, costumes &/or makeup, props, etc.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work individually.
  • Share reflections of the work individually.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work in small groups.
  • Share reflections of the work in small groups.
  • Determine how sharing reflections enhances or harms the creative experience.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10) Investigate how movement and voice are incorporated into drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
Process Components: Select
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists make strong choices to effectively convey meaning.
EQ: Why are strong choices essential to interpreting a drama or theatre piece?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • reflection
Analysis
  • plot
  • dialogue
  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • resolution
Voice
  • pitch
  • volume
  • tone
  • relaxation
  • breathing
  • articulation
Movement
  • posture
  • facial expression
  • gestures
Characterization
Directing
Design
  • scenery
  • costumes
  • makeup
  • props
Theatrical production
  • concentration
  • recall
  • technical elements
Skill Examples:
  • Identify parts (see Freytag's pyramid) or other formats for dramatic plot structure and be able to identify examples of conflict in dialogue or short scenes.
  • Apply and use the elements of dramatic structure to create a dramatic/ theatrical work by mapping out a scene around some central conflict.
  • Investigate how movement is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through posture, facial expression, and gesture.
  • Investigate how voice is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through pitch, volume, and tone.
  • Participate in various physical exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to enhance expressiveness of movement and working as part of a group.
  • Participate in various vocal exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to work on relaxation, breathing, and articulation.
  • Participate in emotional/ mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work, especially exercises that enhance concentration and recall.
  • Identify technical elements that are used in a dramatic/ theatrical work including scenery, costumes &/or makeup, props, etc.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work individually.
  • Share reflections of the work individually.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work in small groups.
  • Share reflections of the work in small groups.
  • Determine how sharing reflections enhances or harms the creative experience.
Prepare
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11) Participate in a variety of physical, vocal, and emotional/mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 5: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation.
Process Components: Prepare
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists develop personal processes and skills for a performance or design.
EQ: What can I do to fully prepare a performance or technical design?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • reflection
Analysis
  • plot
  • dialogue
  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • resolution
Voice
  • pitch
  • volume
  • tone
  • relaxation
  • breathing
  • articulation
Movement
  • posture
  • facial expression
  • gestures
Characterization
Directing
Design
  • scenery
  • costumes
  • makeup
  • props
Theatrical production
  • concentration
  • recall
  • technical elements
Skill Examples:
  • Identify parts (see Freytag's pyramid) or other formats for dramatic plot structure and be able to identify examples of conflict in dialogue or short scenes.
  • Apply and use the elements of dramatic structure to create a dramatic/ theatrical work by mapping out a scene around some central conflict.
  • Investigate how movement is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through posture, facial expression, and gesture.
  • Investigate how voice is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through pitch, volume, and tone.
  • Participate in various physical exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to enhance expressiveness of movement and working as part of a group.
  • Participate in various vocal exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to work on relaxation, breathing, and articulation.
  • Participate in emotional/ mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work, especially exercises that enhance concentration and recall.
  • Identify technical elements that are used in a dramatic/ theatrical work including scenery, costumes &/or makeup, props, etc.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work individually.
  • Share reflections of the work individually.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work in small groups.
  • Share reflections of the work in small groups.
  • Determine how sharing reflections enhances or harms the creative experience.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12) Identify the basic technical elements that can be used in drama/theatre work.

Example: Identify costume and scenery needs for a small scene in class.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 5: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation.
Process Components: Prepare
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists develop personal processes and skills for a performance or design.
EQ: What can I do to fully prepare a performance or technical design?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • reflection
Analysis
  • plot
  • dialogue
  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • resolution
Voice
  • pitch
  • volume
  • tone
  • relaxation
  • breathing
  • articulation
Movement
  • posture
  • facial expression
  • gestures
Characterization
Directing
Design
  • scenery
  • costumes
  • makeup
  • props
Theatrical production
  • concentration
  • recall
  • technical elements
Skill Examples:
  • Identify parts (see Freytag's pyramid) or other formats for dramatic plot structure and be able to identify examples of conflict in dialogue or short scenes.
  • Apply and use the elements of dramatic structure to create a dramatic/ theatrical work by mapping out a scene around some central conflict.
  • Investigate how movement is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through posture, facial expression, and gesture.
  • Investigate how voice is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through pitch, volume, and tone.
  • Participate in various physical exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to enhance expressiveness of movement and working as part of a group.
  • Participate in various vocal exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to work on relaxation, breathing, and articulation.
  • Participate in emotional/ mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work, especially exercises that enhance concentration and recall.
  • Identify technical elements that are used in a dramatic/ theatrical work including scenery, costumes &/or makeup, props, etc.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work individually.
  • Share reflections of the work individually.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work in small groups.
  • Share reflections of the work in small groups.
  • Determine how sharing reflections enhances or harms the creative experience.
Present
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13) Practice drama/theatre work and share reflections individually and in small groups.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 6: Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work.
Process Components: Present
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists share and present stories, ideas, and envisioned worlds to explore the human experience.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists and audiences share a creative experience?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • reflection
Analysis
  • plot
  • dialogue
  • exposition
  • conflict
  • rising action
  • climax
  • falling action
  • resolution
Voice
  • pitch
  • volume
  • tone
  • relaxation
  • breathing
  • articulation
Movement
  • posture
  • facial expression
  • gestures
Characterization
Directing
Design
  • scenery
  • costumes
  • makeup
  • props
Theatrical production
  • concentration
  • recall
  • technical elements
Skill Examples:
  • Identify parts (see Freytag's pyramid) or other formats for dramatic plot structure and be able to identify examples of conflict in dialogue or short scenes.
  • Apply and use the elements of dramatic structure to create a dramatic/ theatrical work by mapping out a scene around some central conflict.
  • Investigate how movement is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through posture, facial expression, and gesture.
  • Investigate how voice is incorporated into a dramatic/ theatrical work through pitch, volume, and tone.
  • Participate in various physical exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to enhance expressiveness of movement and working as part of a group.
  • Participate in various vocal exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work to work on relaxation, breathing, and articulation.
  • Participate in emotional/ mental exercises that can be used in a group setting for dramatic/ theatrical work, especially exercises that enhance concentration and recall.
  • Identify technical elements that are used in a dramatic/ theatrical work including scenery, costumes &/or makeup, props, etc.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work individually.
  • Share reflections of the work individually.
  • Practice dramatic/ theatrical work in small groups.
  • Share reflections of the work in small groups.
  • Determine how sharing reflections enhances or harms the creative experience.
Responding
Reflect
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14) Make observations explaining why artistic choices are made in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work.
Process Components: Reflect
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists reflect to understand the impact of drama processes and theatre experiences.
EQ: How do theatre artists comprehend the essence of drama processes and theatre experiences?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Interpret
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15) Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16) Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics and prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives in drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17) Examine how connections are made between oneself and a character's emotions in drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Evaluate
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
18) Recognize how and why audiences evaluate drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
19) Consider and analyze technical elements from multiple drama/theatre works.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
20) Evaluate and analyze problems and situations in a drama/theatre work from an audience perspective.

Example: Student audiences give peer assessment of student performances.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
  • observation
  • perspective (cultural, audience)
  • content
  • tone
Voice
Movement
Characterization
  • emotions
  • memory
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • mood
  • applaud
  • attentive
Skill Examples:
  • Make observations that explain why artistic choices were made in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., being able to explain how movement, props, and other technical elements affect mood).
  • Students observe or participate in a dramatic/ theatrical work with appropriate behavior (e.g., applauding, remaining attentive, avoiding distracting behaviors, etc.).
  • Identify multiple personal experiences when participating in or observing a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Explain meaning of cultural perspectives.
  • Practice identifying various cultural perspectives. Folktales from Africa, Native Americans, Japan, etc. and cultural figures such as Harriet Tubman, Mulan, etc., provide some good source material.
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using physical characteristics that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., a warrior might walk with straight posture, a Chinese lady might make small, shuffling steps, etc.).
  • Consider multiple ways to develop a character using prop or costume design choices that reflect appropriate cultural perspectives (e.g., an old man may use a cane, a Japanese woman may carry a fan, a woman of African descent might wear a headscarf, etc.).
  • Identify a character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., excitement by bouncing in a seat, anger in slamming a door or yelling, etc.).
  • Make connections between oneself and the character's emotions in a dramatic/ theatrical work and be able to explain how those connections are made (e.g., being able to connect the work to a personal memory or being able to explain how the student might respond similarly or differently in a similar situation in the student's own life).
  • Recognize how audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., content, tone, technical elements, theme, etc.).
  • Recognize why audiences evaluate dramatic/ theatrical works (e.g., to determine whether or not to see it again or suggest it to a friend, to influence sales, to inspire their own work, etc.).
  • Identify what technical elements are (e.g., scenery, lighting, makeup and costume design, and props).
  • Identify and articulate technical elements found in multiple dramatic/ theatrical works.
  • Analyze the technical elements from multiple drama/ theatrical works. Be able to explain how they contribute to the story or characters in the work.
  • Explain what audience perspective is. Be able to articulate what your audience cares about, what might offend them, what they need and want, etc.
  • Evaluate and analyze problems and situations that arise in a dramatic/ theatrical work from an audience perspective. Explain how a work might be perceived from various perspectives (i.e., a sweet, old grandmother; a sad unloved, poor boy; a class clown, etc.) and how the work might need to change to work for those various audiences.
Connecting
Empathize
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
21) Use personal experiences and knowledge to make connections to community and culture in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 10: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences.
Process Components: Empathize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists allow awareness of interrelationships between self and others to influence and inform their work.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists foster understanding between self and others through critical awareness, social responsibility, and the exploration of empathy?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • adaptation
  • depiction
Analysis
  • personal experience
  • community
  • culture
  • social issues
Voice
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • commercial
  • skit
Skill Examples:
  • Identify personal experiences and knowledge that pertain to community and culture.
  • Connect personal experiences and knowledge to community and culture in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., a commercial, a video, a skit, etc.).
  • Identify connections to community in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to social issues in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to other content areas in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., art in set or prop design, science in making machines, literature in Reader's Theater, history in plot and costuming, etc.).
  • Read or familiarize oneself with a particular story (e.g., "Jack and the Beanstalk", paying close attention to characterization and plot.
  • Explore how the story is adapted and presented historically in different art forms, genres, or dramatic/ theatrical conventions (e.g., the original Cornish version of" Jack and the Beanstalk" from the 1700s, wood engravings of the tale, and other illustrations through the centuries and decades, scenes in film from Abbott and Costello to Disney to the scene in the musical Into the Woods).
  • Explain how the plot and the depictions of the main characters have changed through the years. Suggest reasons why stories might have changed.
Interrelate
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
22) Identify connections to community, social issues, and other content areas in drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Interrelate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists understand and can communicate their creative process as they analyze the way the world may be understood.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists allow an understanding of themselves and the world to inform perceptions about theatre and the purpose of their work?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • adaptation
  • depiction
Analysis
  • personal experience
  • community
  • culture
  • social issues
Voice
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • commercial
  • skit
Skill Examples:
  • Identify personal experiences and knowledge that pertain to community and culture.
  • Connect personal experiences and knowledge to community and culture in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., a commercial, a video, a skit, etc.).
  • Identify connections to community in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to social issues in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to other content areas in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., art in set or prop design, science in making machines, literature in Reader's Theater, history in plot and costuming, etc.).
  • Read or familiarize oneself with a particular story (e.g., "Jack and the Beanstalk", paying close attention to characterization and plot.
  • Explore how the story is adapted and presented historically in different art forms, genres, or dramatic/ theatrical conventions (e.g., the original Cornish version of" Jack and the Beanstalk" from the 1700s, wood engravings of the tale, and other illustrations through the centuries and decades, scenes in film from Abbott and Costello to Disney to the scene in the musical Into the Woods).
  • Explain how the plot and the depictions of the main characters have changed through the years. Suggest reasons why stories might have changed.
Research
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
23) Explore how stories are adapted from literature to drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Research
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists critically inquire into the ways others have thought about and created drama processes and productions to inform their own work.
EQ: In what ways can research into theatre histories, theories, literature, and performances alter the way a drama process or production is understood?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • adaptation
  • depiction
Analysis
  • personal experience
  • community
  • culture
  • social issues
Voice
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • commercial
  • skit
Skill Examples:
  • Identify personal experiences and knowledge that pertain to community and culture.
  • Connect personal experiences and knowledge to community and culture in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., a commercial, a video, a skit, etc.).
  • Identify connections to community in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to social issues in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to other content areas in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., art in set or prop design, science in making machines, literature in Reader's Theater, history in plot and costuming, etc.).
  • Read or familiarize oneself with a particular story (e.g., "Jack and the Beanstalk", paying close attention to characterization and plot.
  • Explore how the story is adapted and presented historically in different art forms, genres, or dramatic/ theatrical conventions (e.g., the original Cornish version of" Jack and the Beanstalk" from the 1700s, wood engravings of the tale, and other illustrations through the centuries and decades, scenes in film from Abbott and Costello to Disney to the scene in the musical Into the Woods).
  • Explain how the plot and the depictions of the main characters have changed through the years. Suggest reasons why stories might have changed.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 3
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
24) Examine how artists have historically presented the same stories using different art forms, genres, or drama/theatre conventions.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Research
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists critically inquire into the ways others have thought about and created drama processes and productions to inform their own work.
EQ: In what ways can research into theatre histories, theories, literature, and performances alter the way a drama process or production is understood?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
  • adaptation
  • depiction
Analysis
  • personal experience
  • community
  • culture
  • social issues
Voice
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production
  • commercial
  • skit
Skill Examples:
  • Identify personal experiences and knowledge that pertain to community and culture.
  • Connect personal experiences and knowledge to community and culture in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., a commercial, a video, a skit, etc.).
  • Identify connections to community in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to social issues in a dramatic/ theatrical work.
  • Identify connections to other content areas in a dramatic/ theatrical work (e.g., art in set or prop design, science in making machines, literature in Reader's Theater, history in plot and costuming, etc.).
  • Read or familiarize oneself with a particular story (e.g., "Jack and the Beanstalk", paying close attention to characterization and plot.
  • Explore how the story is adapted and presented historically in different art forms, genres, or dramatic/ theatrical conventions (e.g., the original Cornish version of" Jack and the Beanstalk" from the 1700s, wood engravings of the tale, and other illustrations through the centuries and decades, scenes in film from Abbott and Costello to Disney to the scene in the musical Into the Woods).
  • Explain how the plot and the depictions of the main characters have changed through the years. Suggest reasons why stories might have changed.