Courses of Study

Creating
Envision, Conceptualize
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1) Identify possible solutions to staging challenges in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Envision, Conceptualize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre Artists rely on intuition, curiosity and critical inquiry.
EQ: What happens when Theatre artists use their imagination and/or learned theatre skills while engaging in creative exploration and inquiry?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2) Identify solutions to design challenges in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Envision, Conceptualize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre Artists rely on intuition, curiosity and critical inquiry.
EQ: What happens when Theatre artists use their imagination and/or learned theatre skills while engaging in creative exploration and inquiry?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Develop
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3) Explore a scripted or improvised character by imagining the given circumstances in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4) Use critical analysis to improve, refine, and evolve original ideas and artistic choices in a devised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5) Contribute ideas and accept and incorporate the ideas of others in preparing or devising drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Develop
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists work to discover different ways of communicating meaning.
EQ: How, when, and why do theatre artists' choices change?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Rehearse
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6) Articulate and examine choices to refine a devised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7) Identify effective physical and vocal traits of characters in an improvised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8) Explore a planned technical design during the rehearsal process for a devised or scripted drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Rehearse
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists refine their work and practice their craft through rehearsal.
EQ: How do theatre artists transform and edit their initial ideas?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization

Skills Assessed
  • Sixth graders work collaboratively to plan a dramatization, take part in its production, and discuss the results. They project movement and improvise dialogue in dramas. No prop, sets, or costumes used at this point.
  • The focus for this age group is to expand body awareness and sensory perceptions. Students incorporate their life experiences into dramatic play by creating environments, analyzing characters, and inventing actions to depict chosen life experiences.
Skill Examples:
Ways to Explore Imagination: Ways to Create Body Movement with Storytelling:
  • Students can incorporate group storytelling with using the concept of a living pop-up book. Students work in groups of three to five to write an original story and are prepared to act it out with the use of the concept of the Pop Up Book. See the link below:
  • http://www.bbbpress.com/2015/01/drama-game-pop-up-book/
Way to Explore Artistic Choices:
  • For the idea to create their own understanding and opinion of artistic choices, students view live and recorded presentations, identifying dramatic elements such as plot, dialogue, movement, set, costume, and props. Students demonstrate, describe, and illustrate, with examples from the performance(s), a variety of ways a specific character communicates with the audience. Students should be able to articulate these opinions in oral and written form. Below is a great link to comparing acting choices in theatre vs. film. This is a great starting point:
  • https://www.theatrefolk.com/blog/stage-vs-screen-a-comparison-of-acting-techniques/
Performing
Select
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9) Identify the essential events in a story or script that make up the dramatic structure in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
Process Components: Select
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists make strong choices to effectively convey meaning.
EQ: Why are strong choices essential to interpreting a drama or theatre piece?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • The student improvises, writes, and rewrites monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey predetermined intent and meaning. Student directors are accountable for small group presentations of a scene or vignette. The director is responsible for incorporating all aspects of a production into a unified whole.
  • This explores the concepts of production and design by taking the basics and forming a full production.
Skill Examples:
Personal Processes and Interpreting a Piece
  • Given a prompt, a small group of students improvise a scene to be staged within a designated time period. After the improvisation, students discuss ways to better communicate the group's interpretation.
  • Students then transform the improvisation into a written script that includes stage movements, sound and visual effects, and other details.
  • Students select a director, actors, and technicians; rehearse; and present the scene. After viewing a recording of their scene, students re-evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their intent, make revisions, and present their scene before the class, which then participates in the evaluative response.
  • This activity allows students to explore all aspects of the performance and has them evaluate themselves on camera to make changes and artistic choices.
Resources for Age Appropriate Plays for Improv Starters Reflections and Shared Experiences
  • By utilizing multiple groups, students will be allowed to be both performer and audience member. The students should keep an Actor's Notebook and have several prompts from the teacher being critical of the interactions between an audience and performer.
Resources for Journaling and Self Reflection
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10) Experiment with various physical choices to communicate character in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
Process Components: Select
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists make strong choices to effectively convey meaning.
EQ: Why are strong choices essential to interpreting a drama or theatre piece?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • The student improvises, writes, and rewrites monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey predetermined intent and meaning. Student directors are accountable for small group presentations of a scene or vignette. The director is responsible for incorporating all aspects of a production into a unified whole.
  • This explores the concepts of production and design by taking the basics and forming a full production.
Skill Examples:
Personal Processes and Interpreting a Piece
  • Given a prompt, a small group of students improvise a scene to be staged within a designated time period. After the improvisation, students discuss ways to better communicate the group's interpretation.
  • Students then transform the improvisation into a written script that includes stage movements, sound and visual effects, and other details.
  • Students select a director, actors, and technicians; rehearse; and present the scene. After viewing a recording of their scene, students re-evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their intent, make revisions, and present their scene before the class, which then participates in the evaluative response.
  • This activity allows students to explore all aspects of the performance and has them evaluate themselves on camera to make changes and artistic choices.
Resources for Age Appropriate Plays for Improv Starters Reflections and Shared Experiences
  • By utilizing multiple groups, students will be allowed to be both performer and audience member. The students should keep an Actor's Notebook and have several prompts from the teacher being critical of the interactions between an audience and performer.
Resources for Journaling and Self Reflection
Prepare
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11) Recognize how acting exercises and techniques can be applied to a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 5: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation.
Process Components: Prepare
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists develop personal processes and skills for a performance or design.
EQ: What can I do to fully prepare a performance or technical design?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • The student improvises, writes, and rewrites monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey predetermined intent and meaning. Student directors are accountable for small group presentations of a scene or vignette. The director is responsible for incorporating all aspects of a production into a unified whole.
  • This explores the concepts of production and design by taking the basics and forming a full production.
Skill Examples:
Personal Processes and Interpreting a Piece
  • Given a prompt, a small group of students improvise a scene to be staged within a designated time period. After the improvisation, students discuss ways to better communicate the group's interpretation.
  • Students then transform the improvisation into a written script that includes stage movements, sound and visual effects, and other details.
  • Students select a director, actors, and technicians; rehearse; and present the scene. After viewing a recording of their scene, students re-evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their intent, make revisions, and present their scene before the class, which then participates in the evaluative response.
  • This activity allows students to explore all aspects of the performance and has them evaluate themselves on camera to make changes and artistic choices.
Resources for Age Appropriate Plays for Improv Starters Reflections and Shared Experiences
  • By utilizing multiple groups, students will be allowed to be both performer and audience member. The students should keep an Actor's Notebook and have several prompts from the teacher being critical of the interactions between an audience and performer.
Resources for Journaling and Self Reflection
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12) Articulate how technical elements are integrated into a drama/ theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 5: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation.
Process Components: Prepare
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists develop personal processes and skills for a performance or design.
EQ: What can I do to fully prepare a performance or technical design?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • The student improvises, writes, and rewrites monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey predetermined intent and meaning. Student directors are accountable for small group presentations of a scene or vignette. The director is responsible for incorporating all aspects of a production into a unified whole.
  • This explores the concepts of production and design by taking the basics and forming a full production.
Skill Examples:
Personal Processes and Interpreting a Piece
  • Given a prompt, a small group of students improvise a scene to be staged within a designated time period. After the improvisation, students discuss ways to better communicate the group's interpretation.
  • Students then transform the improvisation into a written script that includes stage movements, sound and visual effects, and other details.
  • Students select a director, actors, and technicians; rehearse; and present the scene. After viewing a recording of their scene, students re-evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their intent, make revisions, and present their scene before the class, which then participates in the evaluative response.
  • This activity allows students to explore all aspects of the performance and has them evaluate themselves on camera to make changes and artistic choices.
Resources for Age Appropriate Plays for Improv Starters Reflections and Shared Experiences
  • By utilizing multiple groups, students will be allowed to be both performer and audience member. The students should keep an Actor's Notebook and have several prompts from the teacher being critical of the interactions between an audience and performer.
Resources for Journaling and Self Reflection
Present
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13) Adapt a drama/theatre work and present it informally for an audience.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Performing
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 6: Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work.
Process Components: Present
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists share and present stories, ideas, and envisioned worlds to explore the human experience.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists and audiences share a creative experience?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • The student improvises, writes, and rewrites monologues, scenes, and vignettes to convey predetermined intent and meaning. Student directors are accountable for small group presentations of a scene or vignette. The director is responsible for incorporating all aspects of a production into a unified whole.
  • This explores the concepts of production and design by taking the basics and forming a full production.
Skill Examples:
Personal Processes and Interpreting a Piece
  • Given a prompt, a small group of students improvise a scene to be staged within a designated time period. After the improvisation, students discuss ways to better communicate the group's interpretation.
  • Students then transform the improvisation into a written script that includes stage movements, sound and visual effects, and other details.
  • Students select a director, actors, and technicians; rehearse; and present the scene. After viewing a recording of their scene, students re-evaluate their effectiveness in achieving their intent, make revisions, and present their scene before the class, which then participates in the evaluative response.
  • This activity allows students to explore all aspects of the performance and has them evaluate themselves on camera to make changes and artistic choices.
Resources for Age Appropriate Plays for Improv Starters Reflections and Shared Experiences
  • By utilizing multiple groups, students will be allowed to be both performer and audience member. The students should keep an Actor's Notebook and have several prompts from the teacher being critical of the interactions between an audience and performer.
Resources for Journaling and Self Reflection
Responding
Reflect
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14) Describe and record personal reactions to artistic choices in a drama/theatre work.

Examples: written critique, student journal, blog

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work.
Process Components: Reflect
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists reflect to understand the impact of drama processes and theatre experiences.
EQ: How do theatre artists comprehend the essence of drama processes and theatre experiences?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Interpret
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15) Explain how artists make choices based on personal experience in a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16) Identify significant cultural perspectives that may influence the evaluation of a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17) Identify personal aesthetics, preferences, and beliefs through participation in or observation of drama/ theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists' interpretations of drama/theatre work are influenced by personal experiences and aesthetics
EQ: How can the same work of art communicate different messages to different people?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Evaluate
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
18) Use supporting evidence and predetermined criteria to evaluate drama/theatre work.

Examples: performance rubric, oral critique, peer assessment

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
19) Explore the production elements used in a drama/theatre work to assess aesthetic choices.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
20) Identify a specific audience or purpose for a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Evaluate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists apply criteria to investigate, explore, and assess drama and theatre work.
EQ: How are the theatre artist's processes and the audience's perspectives impacted by analysis and synthesis?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Research
Analysis
Vocal
Movement
Characterization
Directing
Design
Theatrical production

Skills Assessed
  • Make informed, critical evaluations of theatrical performances from an audience member and a participant point of view, and develop a framework for making informed theatrical choices.
  • Interpret constructive criticism and objective praise in order to improve upon one's work.
  • Use critical thinking skills in character analysis and performance.
  • Perceive and defend the quality of a theatrical work. Evaluate elements of characterization.
Skill Examples:
  • Students will perform a scene with a partner. They will use their character analysis, play analysis, and period research to develop strong choices for their scene work. They will perform for the class. This lesson links back to previous in 6th grade.
  • Students will perform for each other. They will have an open oral critique of each performance. Students will openly discuss what worked for each scene and what was challenging. Students will learn how to critique in a positive way. Use the rubrics and suggested safe, inviting classroom rules in the resources.
  • To explore cultural perspectives and personal beliefs, students will use Number the Stars based on the book by Lois Lowry. Adapted by Dr. Douglas W. Larche, with educational and editorial assistance from Susan Elliott Larche.
  • It can be described as follows: During the German occupation of Denmark in World War II, the Nazis closed down Jewish-owned businesses and began to round up the Jews for relocation to concentration camps for the Final Solution. Danish freedom fighters of all ages risked everything in daring, hurried attempts to rescue the entire Jewish population. In this stirring new play, young Annemarie and Kirsti Johansen face soldiers, interrogations, fierce dogs, personal danger, the loss of loved ones and their own fears as they try to help their friend Ellen Rosen escape across the ocean to Sweden and safely. Courage, faith, ingenuity and even their fledgling acting skills eventually win the day.
  • Students will use the above reference text and perform scenes, create costume and set designs, and create promotional materials. Students will be expected to rate each other's work and be able to use critical thinking to evaluate the processes.
Resources:
Connecting
Empathize
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
21) Explain how the actions and motivations of characters in a drama/theatre work impact perspectives of a community or culture.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 10: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences.
Process Components: Empathize
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists allow awareness of interrelationships between self and others to influence and inform their work.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists foster understanding between self and others through critical awareness, social responsibility, and the exploration of empathy?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Skills Assessed
Research
  • Through theatre history research, a student can articulate connections between past theatre practices and their contemporary counterparts.

Analysis
  • Students will use the knowledge of the relationships between historical elements of theatre and contemporary theatre practice can inform and influence a production concept.
Skill Examples:
  • Students explore dramatizations and scenes from a variety of historical periods and cultures.
  • Specific examples of theatrical productions stimulate understanding of the impact of society on theatre, and theatre's impact on society.
Resources for Research and Analysis Using History to Compare
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of the historical practice of commedia dell 'arte by preparing a short presentation to include: Aspects of commedia dell 'arte: lazzi, scenarios, plot, specific stances and mannerisms of commedia dell 'arte characters. Character examples with their identified commedia dell 'arte counterparts: straight (young lovers); exaggerated (masters (Pantalone, Dottore, Capitano) and servants (Harlequin, Pulcinello, Brighella) Basic beginning, middle, end storyline of scene. Students will then apply the stock characters and scenarios to their favorite TV show or a well-known nursery rhyme. Students will complete both a written script and oral performance.
Interrelate
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
22) Identify universal themes or common social issues and express them through a drama/theatre work.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Interrelate
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists understand and can communicate their creative process as they analyze the way the world may be understood.
EQ: What happens when theatre artists allow an understanding of themselves and the world to inform perceptions about theatre and the purpose of their work?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Skills Assessed
Research
  • Through theatre history research, a student can articulate connections between past theatre practices and their contemporary counterparts.

Analysis
  • Students will use the knowledge of the relationships between historical elements of theatre and contemporary theatre practice can inform and influence a production concept.
Skill Examples:
  • Students explore dramatizations and scenes from a variety of historical periods and cultures.
  • Specific examples of theatrical productions stimulate understanding of the impact of society on theatre, and theatre's impact on society.
Resources for Research and Analysis Using History to Compare
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of the historical practice of commedia dell 'arte by preparing a short presentation to include: Aspects of commedia dell 'arte: lazzi, scenarios, plot, specific stances and mannerisms of commedia dell 'arte characters. Character examples with their identified commedia dell 'arte counterparts: straight (young lovers); exaggerated (masters (Pantalone, Dottore, Capitano) and servants (Harlequin, Pulcinello, Brighella) Basic beginning, middle, end storyline of scene. Students will then apply the stock characters and scenarios to their favorite TV show or a well-known nursery rhyme. Students will complete both a written script and oral performance.
Research
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
23) Research and analyze two different versions of the same drama/theatre story to determine differences and similarities in the visual and aural world of each version.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Research
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists critically inquire into the ways others have thought about and created drama processes and productions to inform their own work.
EQ: In what ways can research into theatre histories, theories, literature, and performances alter the way a drama process or production is understood?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Skills Assessed
Research
  • Through theatre history research, a student can articulate connections between past theatre practices and their contemporary counterparts.

Analysis
  • Students will use the knowledge of the relationships between historical elements of theatre and contemporary theatre practice can inform and influence a production concept.
Skill Examples:
  • Students explore dramatizations and scenes from a variety of historical periods and cultures.
  • Specific examples of theatrical productions stimulate understanding of the impact of society on theatre, and theatre's impact on society.
Resources for Research and Analysis Using History to Compare
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of the historical practice of commedia dell 'arte by preparing a short presentation to include: Aspects of commedia dell 'arte: lazzi, scenarios, plot, specific stances and mannerisms of commedia dell 'arte characters. Character examples with their identified commedia dell 'arte counterparts: straight (young lovers); exaggerated (masters (Pantalone, Dottore, Capitano) and servants (Harlequin, Pulcinello, Brighella) Basic beginning, middle, end storyline of scene. Students will then apply the stock characters and scenarios to their favorite TV show or a well-known nursery rhyme. Students will complete both a written script and oral performance.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 6
Theatre
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
24) Investigate the time period and place of a drama/theatre work to better understand performance and design choices.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Research
Essential Questions:
EU: Theatre artists critically inquire into the ways others have thought about and created drama processes and productions to inform their own work.
EQ: In what ways can research into theatre histories, theories, literature, and performances alter the way a drama process or production is understood?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
Skills Assessed
Research
  • Through theatre history research, a student can articulate connections between past theatre practices and their contemporary counterparts.

Analysis
  • Students will use the knowledge of the relationships between historical elements of theatre and contemporary theatre practice can inform and influence a production concept.
Skill Examples:
  • Students explore dramatizations and scenes from a variety of historical periods and cultures.
  • Specific examples of theatrical productions stimulate understanding of the impact of society on theatre, and theatre's impact on society.
Resources for Research and Analysis Using History to Compare
  • Students will demonstrate their understanding of the historical practice of commedia dell 'arte by preparing a short presentation to include: Aspects of commedia dell 'arte: lazzi, scenarios, plot, specific stances and mannerisms of commedia dell 'arte characters. Character examples with their identified commedia dell 'arte counterparts: straight (young lovers); exaggerated (masters (Pantalone, Dottore, Capitano) and servants (Harlequin, Pulcinello, Brighella) Basic beginning, middle, end storyline of scene. Students will then apply the stock characters and scenarios to their favorite TV show or a well-known nursery rhyme. Students will complete both a written script and oral performance.