Courses of Study

Creating
Investigate, Plan, Make
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1) Individually brainstorm multiple approaches to an art problem.

Examples: Create lists, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Investigate, Plan, Make
Essential Questions:
EU: Creativity and innovative thinking are essential life skills that can be developed.
EQ: What conditions, attitudes, and behaviors support creativity and innovative thinking? What factors prevent or encourage people to take creative risks? How does collaboration expand the creative process?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 7
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2) Collaboratively design and create artwork that has meaning and purpose.

Examples: Create a logo for a school or activity.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Investigate, Plan, Make
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists and designers shape artistic investigations, following or breaking with traditions in pursuit of creative artmaking goals.
EQ: How does knowing the contexts, histories, and traditions of art forms help create works of art and design? Why do artists follow or break from established traditions? How do artists determine what resources and criteria are needed to formulate artistic investigations?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3) Generate ideas and employ a variety of strategies and techniques to create a work of art/design.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Investigate, Plan, Make
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists and designers experiment with forms, structures, materials, concepts, media, and artmaking approaches.
EQ: How do artists work? How do artists and designers determine whether a particular direction in their work is effective? How do artists and designers learn from trial and error?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4) When making works of art, utilize and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Investigate, Plan, Make
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists and designers balance experimentation and safety, freedom and responsibility while developing and creating artworks.
EQ: How do artists and designers care for and maintain materials, tools, and equipment? Why is it important for safety and health to understand and follow correct procedures in handling materials, tools, and equipment? What responsibilities come with the freedom to create?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Reflect, Refine, Continue
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5) Document, describe, and create real or imagined constructed environments.

Example: Design a futuristic art room, town, or planet.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 2: Organize and develop artistic ideas and work.
Process Components: Reflect, Refine, Continue
Essential Questions:
EU: People create and interact with objects, places, and design that define, shape, enhance, and empower their lives.
EQ: How do objects, places, and design shape lives and communities? How do artists and designers determine goals for designing or redesigning objects, places, or systems? How do artists and designers create works of art or design that effectively communicate?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6) Revise artwork in progress on the basis of insights gained by peer discussion.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Creating
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 3: Refine and complete artistic work.
Process Components: Reflect, Refine, Continue
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists and designers develop excellence through practice and constructive critique, reflecting on, revising, and refining work over time.
EQ: What role does persistence play in revising, refining, and developing work? How do artists grow and become accomplished in art forms? How does collaboratively reflecting on a work help us experience it more completely?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a list of multiple ideas, sketches, or thumbnail-sketches before beginning the final version of an artwork.
  • Identify, select, and vary art materials, tools and processes to achieve desired results in their artwork.
  • Brainstorm (alone or with others) potential art styles for a given piece of art, such as Monet's Water Lilies.
  • Create an artwork from direct observation (still-life, self-portrait, figure drawing, etc.).
  • Design a two-dimensional drawings of a futuristic art room, town, or planet
  • Use wood, found objects, wire, paper, or clay-based materials to construct a three-dimensional form.
  • Locate business logos in the community and explore the visual arts skills and materials that were used to create these works.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others.
  • Experiment with art materials by using them in unusual and creative ways to express ideas and convey meaning.
  • Use and care for materials, tools, and equipment in a manner that prevents danger to oneself and others.
  • Mix equal parts of a primary and a secondary color located beside each other on the color wheel to create a tertiary color.
  • Use the design principles of repetition and alignment to add visual unity to an artwork.
  • Create a painting using a monochromatic color scheme by using one color (red) adding white to create a tint (a lighter value--pink) and adding black to the color (red) to create a shade (darker value).
Presenting
Select, Analyze, Share
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7) Analyze how past, present, and emerging technologies have impacted the preservation and presentation of artwork.

Example: Before cameras, the only way to view artwork was in person.

Now there are books, postcards, posters and Google images.
Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Presenting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 4: Select, analyze, and interpret artistic work for presentation.
Process Components: Select, Analyze, Share
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists and other presenters consider various techniques, methods, venues, and criteria when analyzing, selecting, and curating objects, artifacts, and artworks for preservation and presentation.
EQ: How are artworks cared for and by whom? What criteria, methods, and processes are used to select work for preservation or presentation? Why do people value objects, artifacts, and artworks, and select them for presentation?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare the way artwork was viewed before the camera was invented with the technology and images that are available today.
  • Communicate the processes used to preserve and present visual artworks.
  • Research and share how artwork can be restored, transported, and installed safely for display in museums.
  • Select and prepare different types of artwork for display in different venues, taking into account the context and physical characteristics of each exhibit space.
  • Discuss why one does not touch a famous piece of art in a museum exhibit, such as Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris, France.
  • Look at examples of museums, galleries, and public sculptures and murals in the surrounding community and compare and contrast how people interact with art in different spaces/ places.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8) Discuss various locations for presenting and preserving art, in both indoor and outdoor settings, and in temporary or permanent and physical or digital formats.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Presenting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 5: Develop and refine artistic techniques and work for presentation.
Process Components: Select, Analyze, Share
Essential Questions:
EU: Artists, curators, and others consider a variety of factors and methods including evolving technologies when preparing and refining artwork for display and or when deciding if and how to preserve and protect it.
EQ: What methods and processes are considered when preparing artwork for presentation or preservation? How does refining artwork affect its meaning to the viewer? What criteria are considered when selecting work for presentation, a portfolio, or a collection?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare the way artwork was viewed before the camera was invented with the technology and images that are available today.
  • Communicate the processes used to preserve and present visual artworks.
  • Research and share how artwork can be restored, transported, and installed safely for display in museums.
  • Select and prepare different types of artwork for display in different venues, taking into account the context and physical characteristics of each exhibit space.
  • Discuss why one does not touch a famous piece of art in a museum exhibit, such as Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris, France.
  • Look at examples of museums, galleries, and public sculptures and murals in the surrounding community and compare and contrast how people interact with art in different spaces/ places.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9) Compare and contrast purposes of museums, galleries, and other art venues, as well as the types of personal experiences they provide.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Presenting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 6: Convey meaning through the presentation of artistic work.
Process Components: Select, Analyze, Share
Essential Questions:
EU: Objects, artifacts, and artworks collected, preserved, or presented either by artists, museums, or other venues communicate meaning and a record of social, cultural, and political experiences resulting in the cultivating of appreciation and understanding.
EQ: What is an art museum? How does the presenting and sharing of objects, artifacts, and artworks influence and shape ideas, beliefs, and experiences? How do objects, artifacts, and artworks collected, preserved, or presented, cultivate appreciation and understanding?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare the way artwork was viewed before the camera was invented with the technology and images that are available today.
  • Communicate the processes used to preserve and present visual artworks.
  • Research and share how artwork can be restored, transported, and installed safely for display in museums.
  • Select and prepare different types of artwork for display in different venues, taking into account the context and physical characteristics of each exhibit space.
  • Discuss why one does not touch a famous piece of art in a museum exhibit, such as Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa at the Louvre in Paris, France.
  • Look at examples of museums, galleries, and public sculptures and murals in the surrounding community and compare and contrast how people interact with art in different spaces/ places.
Responding
Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10) Compare responses to a work of art before and after working in similar media.

Example: Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Individual aesthetic and empathetic awareness developed through engagement with art can lead to understanding and appreciation of self, others, the natural world, and constructed environments.
EQ: How do life experiences the way you relate to art? How does learning about art impact how we perceive the world? What can we learn from our responses to art?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11) Analyze components in visual imagery that convey meanings and messages.

Example: What is the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream?

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 7: Perceive and analyze artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Visual imagery influences understanding of and responses to the world.
EQ: What is an image? Where and how do we encounter images in our world? How do images influence our views of the world?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12) Interpret art by referring to contextual information and analyzing relevant subject matter, visual qualities, and use of media.

Example: Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River in 1776 and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 8: Interpret intent and meaning in artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: People gain insights into meanings of artworks by engaging in the process of art criticism.
EQ: What is the value of engaging in the process of art criticism? How can the viewer "read" a work of art as text? How does knowing and using visual arts vocabularies help us understand and interpret works of art?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13) Apply one criterion from elements or principles of design to evaluate more than one work of art/design.

Example: Discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Responding
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 9: Apply criteria to evaluate artistic work.
Process Components: Perceive, Analyze, Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: People evaluate art based on various criteria.
EQ: How does one determine criteria to evaluate a work of art? How and why might criteria vary? How is a personal preference different from an evaluation?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Compare Gyotaku Japanese fish printing and printing with a rubber stamp.
  • Make conclusions about the artist's feelings and perspective.
  • Analyze the meaning of Edvard Munch's The Scream.
  • Interpret Emanuel Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware River and its relevance to the Revolutionary War.
  • Discuss and form an opinion about the social and personal value of a piece of art.
  • Apply one element or principle of design to discuss how students' outcomes are different even though they used the same criteria for a work of art/ design.
  • Formulate criteria for discussing and assessing works of art.
  • Use art vocabulary when discussing and judging artworks.
  • Engage in group critiques of one's work and the work of others for the purpose of personal reflection and on-going improvement.
Connecting
Interpret
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14) Create works of art that reflect community and/or cultural traditions.

Examples: Create a quilt in the style of the Gee's Bend Quilters.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 10: Synthesize and relate knowledge and personal experiences.
Process Components: Interpret
Essential Questions:
EU: Through artmaking, people make meaning by investigating and developing awareness of perceptions, knowledge, and experiences.
EQ: How does engaging in creating art enrich people's lives? How does making art attune people to their surroundings? How do people contribute to awareness and understanding of their lives and the lives of their communities through artmaking?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a quilt square in the style of the Gee's Bend Quilters.
  • State what materials or processes you prefer and why.
  • Discuss how art and design serves multiple functions such as to inform, entertain, invest, persuade, ritualize or assist in everyday tasks.
  • Observe and discuss the statue of Vulcan in Birmingham and talk about its relationship to history of the city.
  • Investigate differences in cultural style, genres, and context through historical time periods.
  • Discuss how art reflects the interests, accomplishments and conflicts of culture and society over time.
  • Use details and descriptive language to identify universal themes, subject matter and ideas expressed across arts disciplines.
  • Identify and describe how artists have depicted Alabama history.
Synthesize
Arts Education (2017)
Grade(s): 4
Visual Arts
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Classroom Resources: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15) Through observation, infer information about time, place, and culture in which a work of art was created.

Example: Look at the statue of Vulcan in Birmingham and talk about its relationship to history of the city.

Insight Unpacked Content
Artistic Process: Connecting
Anchor Standards:
Anchor Standard 11: Relate artistic ideas and works with societal, cultural, and historical context to deepen understanding.
Process Components: Synthesize
Essential Questions:
EU: People develop ideas and understandings of society, culture, and history through their interactions with and analysis of art.
EQ: How does art help us understand the lives of people of different times, places, and cultures? How is art used to impact the views of a society? How does art preserve aspects of life?
Concepts & Vocabulary:
  • Constructed environment
  • Cultural traditions
  • Digital format
  • Engagement
  • Tertiary color
  • Preservation
  • Proportion
  • Principles of design
    • Unity
  • Shade
  • Style
  • Tints & shades
Skill Examples:
  • Create a quilt square in the style of the Gee's Bend Quilters.
  • State what materials or processes you prefer and why.
  • Discuss how art and design serves multiple functions such as to inform, entertain, invest, persuade, ritualize or assist in everyday tasks.
  • Observe and discuss the statue of Vulcan in Birmingham and talk about its relationship to history of the city.
  • Investigate differences in cultural style, genres, and context through historical time periods.
  • Discuss how art reflects the interests, accomplishments and conflicts of culture and society over time.
  • Use details and descriptive language to identify universal themes, subject matter and ideas expressed across arts disciplines.
  • Identify and describe how artists have depicted Alabama history.