Courses of Study: Credit Recovery Science

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Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Select appropriate laboratory glassware, balances, time measuring equipment, and optical instruments to conduct an experiment.

•  Describing the steps of the scientific method
•  Comparing controls, dependent variables, and independent variables
•  Identifying safe laboratory procedures when handling chemicals and using Bunsen burners and laboratory glassware
•  Using appropriate SI units for measuring length, volume, and mass
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Describe cell processes necessary for achieving homeostasis, including active and passive transport, osmosis, diffusion, exocytosis, and endocytosis.

•  Identifying functions of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids in cellular activities
•  Comparing the reaction of plant and animal cells in isotonic, hypotonic, and hypertonic solutions
•  Explaining how surface area, cell size, temperature, light, and pH affect cellular activities
•  Applying the concept of fluid pressure to biological systems
Examples: blood pressure, turgor pressure, bends, strokes

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Identify reactants and products associated with photosynthesis and cellular respiration and the purposes of these two processes.

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Describe similarities and differences of cell organelles, using diagrams and tables.

•  Identifying scientists who contributed to the cell theory
Examples: Hooke, Schleiden, Schwann, Virchow, van Leeuwenhoek

•  Distinguishing between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells
•  Identifying various technologies used to observe cells
Examples: light microscope, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Identify cells, tissues, organs, organ systems, organisms, populations, communities, and ecosystems as levels of organization in the biosphere.

•  Recognizing that cells differentiate to perform specific functions
Examples: ciliated cells to produce movement, nerve cells to conduct electrical charges

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Describe the roles of mitotic and meiotic divisions during reproduction, growth, and repair of cells.

•  Comparing sperm and egg formation in terms of ploidy
Example: ploidy—haploid, diploid

•  Comparing sexual and asexual reproduction
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Apply Mendel's law to determine phenotypic and genotypic probabilities of offspring.

•  Defining important genetic terms, including dihybrid cross, monohybrid cross, phenotype, genotype, homozygous, heterozygous, dominant trait, recessive trait, incomplete dominance, codominance, and allele
•  Interpreting inheritance patterns shown in graphs and charts
•  Calculating genotypic and phenotypic percentages and ratios using a Punnett square
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Identify the structure and function of DNA, RNA, and protein.

•  Explaining relationships among DNA, genes, and chromosomes
•  Listing significant contributions of biotechnology to society, including agricultural and medical practices
Examples: DNA fingerprinting, insulin, growth hormone

•  Relating normal patterns of genetic inheritance to genetic variation
Example: crossing-over

•  Relating ways chance, mutagens, and genetic engineering increase diversity
Examples: insertion, deletion, translocation, inversion, recombinant DNA

•  Relating genetic disorders and disease to patterns of genetic inheritance
Examples: hemophilia, sickle cell anemia, Down's syndrome, Tay-Sachs disease, cystic fibrosis, color blindness, phenylketonuria (PKU)

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Differentiate between the previous five-kingdom and current six-kingdom classification systems.

•  Sequencing taxa from most inclusive to least inclusive in the classification of living things
•  Identifying organisms using a dichotomous key
•  Identifying ways in which organisms from the Monera, Protista, and Fungi kingdoms are beneficial and harmful
Examples:

- beneficial—decomposers,

- harmful—diseases

•  Justifying the grouping of viruses in a category separate from living things
•  Writing scientific names accurately by using binomial nomenclature
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Distinguish between monocots and dicots, angiosperms and gymnosperms, and vascular and nonvascular plants.

•  Describing the histology of roots, stems, leaves, and flowers
•  Recognizing chemical and physical adaptations of plants
Examples:

- chemical—foul odor, bitter taste, toxicity;

- physical—spines, needles, broad leaves

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Classify animals according to type of skeletal structure, method of fertilization and reproduction, body symmetry, body coverings, and locomotion.

Examples:

- skeletal structure—vertebrates, invertebrates;

- fertilization—external, internal;

- reproduction—sexual, asexual;

- body symmetry—bilateral, radial, asymmetrical;

- body coverings—feathers, scales, fur;

- locomotion—cilia, flagella, pseudopodia

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 9
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Describe protective adaptations of animals, including mimicry, camouflage, beak type, migration, and hibernation.

•  Identifying ways in which the theory of evolution explains the nature and diversity of organisms
•  Describing natural selection, survival of the fittest, geographic isolation, and fossil record
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 8
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Trace the flow of energy as it decreases through the trophic levels from producers to the quaternary level in food chains, food webs, and energy pyramids.

•  Describing the interdependence of biotic and abiotic factors in an ecosystem
Examples: effects of humidity on stomata size, effects of dissolved oxygen on fish respiration

•  Contrasting autotrophs and heterotrophs
•  Describing the niche of decomposers
•  Using the ten percent law to explain the decreasing availability of energy through the trophic levels
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 9
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Trace biogeochemical cycles through the environment, including water, carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen.

•  Relating natural disasters, climate changes, nonnative species, and human activity to the dynamic equilibrium of ecosystems
Examples:

- natural disasters—habitat destruction resulting from tornadoes;

- climate changes—changes in migratory patterns of birds;

- nonnative species—exponential growth of kudzu and Zebra mussels due to absence of natural controls;

- human activity—habitat destruction resulting in reduction of biodiversity, conservation resulting in preservation of biodiversity

•  Describing the process of ecological succession
Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 10
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 8
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Identify biomes based on environmental factors and native organisms.

Example: tundra—permafrost, low humidity, lichens, polar bears

Credit Recovery Science (2005)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Identify density-dependent and density-independent limiting factors that affect populations in an ecosystem.

Examples:

- density-dependent—disease, predator-prey relationships, availability of food and water;

- density-independent—natural disasters, climate

•  Discriminating among symbiotic relationships, including mutualism, commensalism, and parasitism