Courses of Study: Science

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Number of Standards matching query: 350
Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Investigate the resulting motion of objects when forces of different strengths and directions act upon them (e.g., object being pushed, object being pulled, two objects colliding).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Use observations and data from investigations to determine if a design solution (e.g., designing a ramp to increase the speed of an object in order to move a stationary object) solves the problem of using force to change the speed or direction of an object.*

Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Distinguish between living and nonliving things and verify what living things need to survive (e.g., animals needing food, water, and air; plants needing nutrients, water, sunlight, and air).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Gather evidence to support how plants and animals provide for their needs by altering their environment (e.g., tree roots breaking a sidewalk to provide space, red fox burrowing to create a den to raise young, humans growing gardens for food and building roads for transportation).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Construct a model of a natural habitat (e.g., terrarium, ant farm, diorama) conducive to meeting the needs of plants and animals native to Alabama.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 18
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 15
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 1
6.) Identify and plan possible solutions (e.g., reducing, reusing, recycling) to lessen the human impact on the local environment.*

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Observe and describe the effects of sunlight on Earth's surface (e.g., heat from the sun causing evaporation of water or increased temperature of soil, rocks, sand, and water).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Design and construct a device (e.g., hat, canopy, umbrella, tent) to reduce the effects of sunlight.*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Observe, record, and share findings of local weather patterns over a period of time (e.g., increase in daily temperature from morning to afternoon, typical rain and storm patterns from season to season).

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): K
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Ask questions to obtain information about the purpose of weather forecasts in planning for, preparing for, and responding to severe weather.*

Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Conduct experiments to provide evidence that vibrations of matter can create sound (e.g., striking a tuning fork, plucking a guitar string) and sound can make matter vibrate (e.g., holding a piece of paper near a sound system speaker, touching your throat while speaking).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Construct explanations from observations that objects can be seen only when light is available to illuminate them (e.g., moon being illuminated by the sun, colors and patterns in a kaleidoscope being illuminated when held toward a light).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Investigate materials to determine which types allow light to pass through (e.g., transparent materials such as clear plastic wrap), allow only partial light to pass through (e.g., translucent materials such as wax paper), block light (e.g., opaque materials such as construction paper), or reflect light (e.g., shiny materials such as aluminum foil).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Design and construct a device that uses light or sound to send a communication signal over a distance (e.g., using a flashlight and a piece of cardboard to simulate a signal lamp for sending a coded message to a classmate, using a paper cup and string to simulate a telephone for talking to a classmate).*

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Design a solution to a human problem by using materials to imitate how plants and/or animals use their external parts to help them survive, grow, and meet their needs (e.g., outerwear imitating animal furs for insulation, gear mimicking tree bark or shells for protection).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Obtain information to provide evidence that parents and their offspring engage in patterns of behavior that help the offspring survive (e.g., crying of offspring indicating need for feeding, quacking or barking by parents indicating protection of young).

Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Make observations to identify the similarities and differences of offspring to their parents and to other members of the same species (e.g., flowers from the same kind of plant being the same shape, but differing in size; dog being same breed as parent, but differing in fur color or pattern).

Earth's Place in the Universe
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Observe, describe, and predict patterns of the sun, moon, and stars as they appear in the sky (e.g., sun and moon appearing to rise in one part of the sky, move across the sky, and set; stars other than our sun being visible at night, but not during the day).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 1
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Observe seasonal patterns of sunrise and sunset to describe the relationship between the number of hours of daylight and the time of year (e.g., more hours of daylight during summer as compared to winter).

Matter and Its Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Conduct an investigation to describe and classify various substances according to physical properties (e.g., milk being a liquid, not clear in color, assuming shape of its container, mixing with water; mineral oil being a liquid, clear in color, taking shape of its container, floating in water; a brick being a solid, not clear in color, rough in texture, not taking the shape of its container, sinking in water).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Collect and evaluate data to determine appropriate uses of materials based on their properties (e.g., strength, flexibility, hardness, texture, absorbency).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Demonstrate and explain how structures made from small pieces (e.g., linking cubes, blocks, building bricks, creative construction toys) can be disassembled and then rearranged to make new and different structures.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Provide evidence that some changes in matter caused by heating or cooling can be reversed (e.g., heating or freezing of water) and some changes are irreversible (e.g., baking a cake, boiling an egg).

Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Plan and carry out an investigation, using one variable at a time (e.g., water, light, soil, air), to determine the growth needs of plants.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Design and construct models to simulate how animals disperse seeds or pollinate plants (e.g., animals brushing fur against seed pods and seeds falling off in other areas, birds and bees extracting nectar from flowers and transferring pollen from one plant to another).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 23
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 21
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 1
7.) Obtain information from literature and other media to illustrate that there are many different kinds of living things and that they exist in different places on land and in water (e.g., woodland, tundra, desert, rainforest, ocean, river).

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Make observations from media to obtain information about Earth's events that happen over a short period of time (e.g., tornados, volcanic explosions, earthquakes) or over a time period longer than one can observe (e.g., erosion of rocks, melting of glaciers).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Create models to identify physical features of Earth (e.g., mountains, valleys, plains, deserts, lakes, rivers, oceans).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Collect and evaluate data to identify water found on Earth and determine whether it is a solid or a liquid (e.g., glaciers as solid forms of water; oceans, lakes, rivers, streams as liquid forms of water).

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 2
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Examine and test solutions that address changes caused by Earth's events (e.g., dams for minimizing flooding, plants for controlling erosion).*

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Plan and carry out an experiment to determine the effects of balanced and unbalanced forces on the motion of an object using one variable at a time, including number, size, direction, speed, position, friction, or air resistance (e.g., balanced forces pushing from both sides on an object, such as a box, producing no motion; unbalanced force on one side of an object, such as a ball, producing motion), and communicate these findings graphically.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Investigate, measure, and communicate in a graphical format how an observed pattern of motion (e.g., a child swinging in a swing, a ball rolling back and forth in a bowl, two children teetering on a see-saw, a model vehicle rolling down a ramp of varying heights, a pendulum swinging) can be used to predict the future motion of an object.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Explore objects that can be manipulated in order to determine cause-and-effect relationships (e.g., distance between objects affecting strength of a force, orientation of magnets affecting direction of a magnetic force) of electric interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force on hair from an electrically charged balloon, electrical forces between a charged rod and pieces of paper) or magnetic interactions between two objects not in contact with one another (e.g., force between two permanent magnets or between an electromagnet and steel paperclips, force exerted by one magnet versus the force exerted by two magnets).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Apply scientific ideas about magnets to solve a problem through an engineering design project (e.g., constructing a latch to keep a door shut, creating a device to keep two moving objects from touching each other such as a maglev system).*

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Obtain and combine information to describe that organisms are classified as living things, rather than nonliving things, based on their ability to obtain and use resources, grow, reproduce, and maintain stable internal conditions while living in a constantly changing external environment.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Create representations to explain the unique and diverse life cycles of organisms other than humans (e.g., flowering plants, frogs, butterflies), including commonalities such as birth, growth, reproduction, and death.

Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Examine data to provide evidence that plants and animals, excluding humans, have traits inherited from parents and that variations of these traits exist in groups of similar organisms (e.g., flower colors in pea plants, fur color and pattern in animal offspring).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Engage in argument from evidence to justify that traits can be influenced by the environment (e.g., stunted growth in normally tall plants due to insufficient water, change in an arctic fox's fur color due to light and/or temperature, stunted growth of a normally large animal due to malnourishment).

Unity and Diversity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Analyze and interpret data from fossils (e.g., type, size, distribution) to provide evidence of organisms and the environments in which they lived long ago (e.g., marine fossils on dry land, tropical plant fossils in arctic areas, fossils of extinct organisms in any environment).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Investigate how variations in characteristics among individuals of the same species may provide advantages in surviving, finding mates, and reproducing (e.g., plants having larger thorns being less likely to be eaten by predators, animals having better camouflage coloration being more likely to survive and bear offspring).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 15
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 13
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Construct an argument from evidence to explain the likelihood of an organism's ability to survive when compared to the resources in a certain habitat (e.g., freshwater organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in saltwater; desert organisms survive well, less well, or not at all in woodlands).

a. Construct explanations that forming groups helps some organisms survive.

b. Create models that illustrate how organisms and their habitats make up a system in which the parts depend on each other.

c. Categorize resources in various habitats as basic materials (e.g., sunlight, air, freshwater, soil), produced materials (e.g., food, fuel, shelter), or as nonmaterial (e.g., safety, instinct, nature-learned behaviors).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Evaluate engineered solutions to a problem created by environmental changes and any resulting impacts on the types and density of plant and animal populations living in the environment (e.g., replanting of sea oats in coastal areas due to destruction by hurricanes, creating property development restrictions in vacation areas to reduce displacement and loss of native animal populations).*

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Display data graphically and in tables to describe typical weather conditions expected during a particular season (e.g., average temperature, precipitation, wind direction).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 10
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 1
14.) Collect information from a variety of sources to describe climates in different regions of the world.

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 3
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 2
15.) Evaluate a design solution (e.g., flood barriers, wind resistant roofs, lightning rods) that reduces the impact of a weather-related hazard.*

Energy
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Use evidence to explain the relationship of the speed of an object to the energy of that object.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Plan and carry out investigations that explain transference of energy from place to place by sound, light, heat, and electric currents.

a. Provide evidence that heat can be produced in many ways (e.g., rubbing hands together, burning leaves) and can move from one object to another by conduction.

b. Demonstrate that different objects can absorb, reflect, and/or conduct energy.

c. Demonstrate that electric circuits require a complete loop through which an electric current can pass.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Investigate to determine changes in energy resulting from increases or decreases in speed that occur when objects collide.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Design, construct, and test a device that changes energy from one form to another (e.g., electric circuits converting electrical energy into motion, light, or sound energy; a passive solar heater converting light energy into heat energy).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Compile information to describe how the use of energy derived from natural renewable and nonrenewable resources affects the environment (e.g., constructing dams to harness energy from water, a renewable resource, while causing a loss of animal habitats; burning of fossil fuels, a nonrenewable resource, while causing an increase in air pollution; installing solar panels to harness energy from the sun, a renewable resource, while requiring specialized materials that necessitate mining).

Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Develop a model of waves to describe patterns in terms of amplitude and wavelength, and including that waves can cause objects to move.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Develop and use models to show multiple solutions in which patterns are used to transfer information (e.g., using a grid of 1s and 0s representing black and white to send information about a picture, using drums to send coded information through sound waves, using Morse code to send a message).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Construct a model to explain that an object can be seen when light reflected from its surface enters the eyes.

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 13
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 9
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Examine evidence to support an argument that the internal and external structures of plants (e.g., thorns, leaves, stems, roots, colored petals, xylem, phloem) and animals (e.g., heart, stomach, lung, brain, skin) function to support survival, growth, behavior, and reproduction.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 13
Learning Activities: 7
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Obtain and communicate information explaining that humans have systems that interact with one another for digestion, respiration, circulation, excretion, movement, control, coordination, and protection from disease.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Investigate different ways animals receive information through the senses, process that information, and respond to it in different ways (e.g., skunks lifting tails and spraying an odor when threatened, dogs moving ears when reacting to sound, snakes coiling or striking when sensing vibrations).

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Construct explanations by citing evidence found in patterns of rock formations and fossils in rock layers that Earth changes over time through both slow and rapid processes (e.g., rock layers containing shell fossils appearing above rock layers containing plant fossils and no shells indicating a change from land to water over time, a canyon with different rock layers in the walls and a river in the bottom indicating that over time a river cut through the rock).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Plan and carry out investigations to examine properties of soils and soil types (e.g., color, texture, capacity to retain water, ability to support growth of plants).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Explore information to support the claim that landforms are the result of a combination of constructive forces, including crustal deformation, volcanic eruptions, and sediment deposition as well as a result of destructive forces, including erosion and weathering.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Analyze and interpret data (e.g., angle of slope in downhill movement of water, volume of water flow, cycles of freezing and thawing of water, cycles of heating and cooling of water, speed of wind, relative rate of soil deposition, amount of vegetation) to determine effects of weathering and rate of erosion by water, ice, wind, and vegetation using one single form of weathering or erosion at a time.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Describe patterns of Earth's features on land and in the ocean using data from maps (e.g., topographic maps of Earth's land and ocean floor; maps of locations of mountains, continental boundaries, volcanoes, and earthquakes).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 4
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17.) Formulate and evaluate solutions to limit the effects of natural Earth processes on humans (e.g., designing earthquake, tornado, or hurricane-resistant buildings; improving monitoring of volcanic activity).*

Matter and Its Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Plan and carry out investigations (e.g., adding air to expand a basketball, compressing air in a syringe, dissolving sugar in water, evaporating salt water) to provide evidence that matter is made of particles too small to be seen.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Investigate matter to provide mathematical evidence, including graphs, to show that regardless of the type of reaction (e.g., new substance forming due to dissolving or mixing) or change (e.g., phase change) that occurs when heating, cooling, or mixing substances, the total weight of the matter is conserved.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Examine matter through observations and measurements to identify materials (e.g., powders, metals, minerals, liquids) based on their properties (e.g., color, hardness, reflectivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, response to magnetic forces, solubility, density).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Investigate whether the mixing of two or more substances results in new substances (e.g., mixing of baking soda and vinegar resulting in the formation of a new substance, gas; mixing of sand and water resulting in no new substance being formed).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Construct explanations from observations to determine how the density of an object affects whether the object sinks or floats when placed in a liquid.

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Construct an explanation from evidence to illustrate that the gravitational force exerted by Earth on objects is directed downward towards the center of Earth.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Design and conduct a test to modify the speed of a falling object due to gravity (e.g., constructing a parachute to keep an attached object from breaking).*

Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Defend the position that plants obtain materials needed for growth primarily from air and water.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Construct an illustration to explain how plants use light energy to convert carbon dioxide and water into a storable fuel, carbohydrates, and a waste product, oxygen, during the process of photosynthesis.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Construct and interpret models (e.g., diagrams, flow charts) to explain that energy in animals' food is used for body repair, growth, motion, and maintenance of body warmth and was once energy from the sun.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 1
11.) Create a model to illustrate the transfer of matter among producers; consumers, including scavengers and decomposers; and the environment.

Earth's Place in the Universe
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Defend the claim that one factor determining the apparent brightness of the sun compared to other stars is the relative distance from Earth.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Analyze data and represent with graphs to reveal patterns of daily changes in length and direction of shadows, day and night, and the seasonal appearance of some stars in the night sky (e.g., shadows and the position and motion of Earth with respect to the sun, visibility of select stars only in particular months).

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Use a model to represent how any two systems, specifically the atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere, and/or hydrosphere, interact and support life (e.g., influence of the ocean on ecosystems, landform shape, and climate; influence of the atmosphere on landforms and ecosystems through weather and climate; influence of mountain ranges on winds and clouds in the atmosphere).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Identify the distribution of freshwater and salt water on Earth (e.g., oceans, lakes, rivers, glaciers, ground water, polar ice caps) and construct a graphical representation depicting the amounts and percentages found in different reservoirs.

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Collect and organize scientific ideas that individuals and communities can use to protect Earth's natural resources and its environment (e.g., terracing land to prevent soil erosion, utilizing no-till farming to improve soil fertility, regulating emissions from factories and automobiles to reduce air pollution, recycling to reduce overuse of landfill areas).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 5
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17.) Design solutions, test, and revise a process for cleaning a polluted environment (e.g., simulating an oil spill in the ocean or a flood in a city and creating a solution for containment and/or cleanup).*

Earth's Place in the Universe
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Create and manipulate models (e.g., physical, graphical, conceptual) to explain the occurrences of day/night cycles, length of year, seasons, tides, eclipses, and lunar phases based on patterns of the observed motions of celestial bodies.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Construct models and use simulations (e.g., diagrams of the relationship between Earth and man-made satellites, rocket launch, International Space Station, elliptical orbits, black holes, life cycles of stars, orbital periods of objects within the solar system, astronomical units and light years) to explain the role of gravity in affecting the motions of celestial bodies bodies (e.g., planets, moons, comets, asteroids, meteors) within galaxies and the solar system.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Develop and use models to determine scale properties of objects in the solar system (e.g., scale model representing sizes and distances of the sun, Earth, moon system based on a one-meter diameter sun).

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Construct explanations from geologic evidence (e.g., change or extinction of particular living organisms; field evidence or representations, including models of geologic cross-sections; sedimentary layering) to identify patterns of Earth's major historical events (e.g., formation of mountain chains and ocean basins, significant volcanic eruptions, fossilization, folding, faulting, igneous intrusion, erosion).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Use evidence to explain how different geologic processes shape Earth's history over widely varying scales of space and time (e.g., chemical and physical erosion; tectonic plate processes; volcanic eruptions; meteor impacts; regional geographical features, including Alabama fault lines, Rickwood Caverns, and Wetumpka Impact Crater).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Provide evidence from data of the distribution of fossils and rocks, continental shapes, and seafloor structures to explain past plate motions.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Use models to construct explanations of the various biogeochemical cycles of Earth (e.g., water, carbon, nitrogen) and the flow of energy that drives these processes.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Plan and carry out investigations that demonstrate the chemical and physical processes that form rocks and cycle Earth's materials (e.g., processes of crystallization, heating and cooling, weathering, deformation, and sedimentation).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Use models to explain how the flow of Earth's internal energy drives a cycling of matter between Earth's surface and deep interior causing plate movements (e.g., mid-ocean ridges, ocean trenches, volcanoes, earthquakes, mountains, rift valleys, volcanic islands).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Use research-based evidence to propose a scientific explanation regarding how the distribution of Earth's resources such as minerals, fossil fuels, and groundwater are the result of ongoing geoscience processes (e.g., past volcanic and hydrothermal activity, burial of organic sediments, active weathering of rock).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Develop and use models of Earth's interior composition to illustrate the resulting magnetic field (e.g., magnetic poles) and to explain its measureable effects (e.g., protection from cosmic radiation).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Integrate qualitative scientific and technical information (e.g., weather maps; diagrams; other visualizations, including radar and computer simulations) to support the claim that motions and complex interactions of air masses result in changes in weather conditions.

a. Use various instruments (e.g., thermometers, barometers, anemometers, wet bulbs) to monitor local weather and examine weather patterns to predict various weather events, especially the impact of severe weather (e.g., fronts, hurricanes, tornados, blizzards, ice storms, droughts).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Use models (e.g., diagrams, maps, globes, digital representations) to explain how the rotation of Earth and unequal heating of its surface create patterns of atmospheric and oceanic circulation that determine regional climates.

a. Use experiments to investigate how energy from the sun is distributed between Earth's surface and its atmosphere by convection and radiation (e.g., warmer water in a pan rising as cooler water sinks, warming one's hands by a campfire).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Analyze and interpret data (e.g., tables, graphs, maps of global and regional temperatures; atmospheric levels of gases such as carbon dioxide and methane; rates of human activities) to describe how various human activities (e.g., use of fossil fuels, creation of urban heat islands, agricultural practices) and natural processes (e.g., solar radiation, greenhouse effect, volcanic activity) may cause changes in local and global temperatures over time.

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Analyze evidence (e.g., databases on human populations, rates of consumption of food and other natural resources) to explain how changes in human population, per capita consumption of natural resources, and other human activities (e.g., land use, resource development, water and air pollution, urbanization) affect Earth's systems.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 6
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Implement scientific principles to design processes for monitoring and minimizing human impact on the environment (e.g., water usage, including withdrawal of water from streams and aquifers or construction of dams and levees; land usage, including urban development, agriculture, or removal of wetlands; pollution of air, water, and land).*

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Engage in argument from evidence to support claims of the cell theory.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Gather and synthesize information to explain how prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells differ in structure and function, including the methods of asexual and sexual reproduction.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Construct an explanation of the function (e.g., mitochondria releasing energy during cellular respiration) of specific cell structures (i.e., nucleus, cell membrane, cell wall, ribosomes, mitochondria, chloroplasts, and vacuoles) for maintaining a stable environment.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Construct models and representations of organ systems (e.g., circulatory, digestive, respiratory, muscular, skeletal, nervous) to demonstrate how multiple interacting organs and systems work together to accomplish specific functions.

Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Examine the cycling of matter between abiotic and biotic parts of ecosystems to explain the flow of energy and the conservation of matter.

a. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information about how food is broken down through chemical reactions to create new molecules that support growth and/or release energy as it moves through an organism.

b. Generate a scientific explanation based on evidence for the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of matter and flow of energy into and out of organisms.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Analyze and interpret data to provide evidence regarding how resource availability impacts individual organisms as well as populations of organisms within an ecosystem.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Use empirical evidence from patterns and data to demonstrate how changes to physical or biological components of an ecosystem (e.g., deforestation, succession, drought, fire, disease, human activities, invasive species) can lead to shifts in populations.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Construct an explanation to predict patterns of interactions in different ecosystems in terms of the relationships between and among organisms (e.g., competition, predation, mutualism, commensalism, parasitism).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Engage in argument to defend the effectiveness of a design solution that maintains biodiversity and ecosystem services (e.g., using scientific, economic, and social considerations regarding purifying water, recycling nutrients, preventing soil erosion).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Use evidence and scientific reasoning to explain how characteristic animal behaviors (e.g., building nests to protect young from cold, herding to protect young from predators, attracting mates for breeding by producing special sounds and displaying colorful plumage, transferring pollen or seeds to create conditions for seed germination and growth) and specialized plant structures (e.g., flower brightness, nectar, and odor attracting birds that transfer pollen; hard outer shells on seeds providing protection prior to germination) affect the probability of successful reproduction of both animals and plants.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Analyze and interpret data to predict how environmental conditions (e.g., weather, availability of nutrients, location) and genetic factors (e.g., selective breeding of cattle or crops) influence the growth of organisms (e.g., drought decreasing plant growth, adequate supply of nutrients for maintaining normal plant growth, identical plant seeds growing at different rates in different weather conditions, fish growing larger in large ponds than in small ponds).

Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Construct and use models (e.g., monohybrid crosses using Punnett squares, diagrams, simulations) to explain that genetic variations between parent and offspring (e.g., different alleles, mutations) occur as a result of genetic differences in randomly inherited genes located on chromosomes and that additional variations may arise from alteration of genetic information.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Construct an explanation from evidence to describe how genetic mutations result in harmful, beneficial, or neutral effects to the structure and function of an organism.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Gather and synthesize information regarding the impact of technologies (e.g., hand pollination, selective breeding, genetic engineering, genetic modification, gene therapy) on the inheritance and/or appearance of desired traits in organisms.

Unity and Diversity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Analyze and interpret data for patterns of change in anatomical structures of organisms using the fossil record and the chronological order of fossil appearance in rock layers.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Construct an explanation based on evidence (e.g., cladogram, phylogenetic tree) for the anatomical similarities and differences among modern organisms and between modern and fossil organisms, including living fossils (e.g., alligator, horseshoe crab, nautilus, coelacanth).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17.) Obtain and evaluate pictorial data to compare patterns in the embryological development across multiple species to identify relationships not evident in the adult anatomy.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 7
Life Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
18.) Construct an explanation from evidence that natural selection acting over generations may lead to the predominance of certain traits that support successful survival and reproduction of a population and to the suppression of other traits.

Matter and Its Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Analyze patterns within the periodic table to construct models (e.g., molecular-level models, including drawings; computer representations) that illustrate the structure, composition, and characteristics of atoms and molecules.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Plan and carry out investigations to generate evidence supporting the claim that one pure substance can be distinguished from another based on characteristic properties.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Construct explanations based on evidence from investigations to differentiate among compounds, mixtures, and solutions.

a. Collect and analyze information to illustrate how synthetic materials (e.g., medicine, food additives, alternative fuels, plastics) are derived from natural resources and how they impact society.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Design and conduct an experiment to determine changes in particle motion, temperature, and state of a pure substance when thermal energy is added to or removed from a system.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Observe and analyze characteristic properties of substances (e.g., odor, density, solubility, flammability, melting point, boiling point) before and after the substances combine to determine if a chemical reaction has occurred.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Create a model, diagram, or digital simulation to describe conservation of mass in a chemical reaction and explain the resulting differences between products and reactants.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Design, construct, and test a device (e.g., glow stick, hand warmer, hot or cold pack, thermal wrap) that either releases or absorbs thermal energy by chemical reactions (e.g., dissolving ammonium chloride or calcium chloride in water) and modify the device as needed based on criteria (e.g., amount/concentration, time, temperature).*

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Use Newton's first law to demonstrate and explain that an object is either at rest or moves at a constant velocity unless acted upon by an external force (e.g., model car on a table remaining at rest until pushed).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Use Newton's second law to demonstrate and explain how changes in an object's motion depend on the sum of the external forces on the object and the mass of the object (e.g., billiard balls moving when hit with a cue stick).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Use Newton's third law to design a model to demonstrate and explain the resulting motion of two colliding objects (e.g., two cars bumping into each other, a hammer hitting a nail).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Plan and carry out investigations to evaluate how various factors (e.g., electric force produced between two charged objects at various positions; magnetic force produced by an electromagnet with varying number of wire turns, varying number or size of dry cells, and varying size of iron core) affect the strength of electric and magnetic forces.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Construct an argument from evidence explaining that fields exist between objects exerting forces on each other (e.g., interactions of magnets, electrically charged strips of tape, electrically charged pith balls, gravitational pull of the moon creating tides) even when the objects are not in contact.

Energy
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Create and analyze graphical displays of data to illustrate the relationships of kinetic energy to the mass and speed of an object (e.g., riding a bicycle at different speeds, hitting a table tennis ball versus a golf ball, rolling similar toy cars with different masses down an incline).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Use models to construct an explanation of how a system of objects may contain varying types and amounts of potential energy (e.g., observing the movement of a roller coaster cart at various inclines, changing the tension in a rubber band, varying the number of batteries connected in a series, observing a balloon with static electrical charge being brought closer to a classmate's hair).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Analyze and interpret data from experiments to determine how various factors affect energy transfer as measured by temperature (e.g., comparing final water temperatures after different masses of ice melt in the same volume of water with the same initial temperature, observing the temperature change of samples of different materials with the same mass and the same material with different masses when adding a specific amount of energy).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Apply the law of conservation of energy to develop arguments supporting the claim that when the kinetic energy of an object changes, energy is transferred to or from the object (e.g., bowling ball hitting pins, brakes being applied to a car).

Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17.) Create and manipulate a model of a simple wave to predict and describe the relationships between wave properties (e.g., frequency, amplitude, wavelength) and energy.

a. Analyze and interpret data to illustrate an electromagnetic spectrum.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
18.) Use models to demonstrate how light and sound waves differ in how they are absorbed, reflected, and transmitted through different types of media.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 8
Physical Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
19.) Integrate qualitative information to explain that common communication devices (e.g., cellular telephones, radios, remote controls, Wi-Fi components, global positioning systems [GPS], wireless technology components) use electromagnetic waves to encode and transmit information.

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Use models to compare and contrast how the structural characteristics of carbohydrates, nucleic acids, proteins, and lipids define their function in organisms.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe the function and diversity of organelles and structures in various types of cells (e.g., muscle cells having a large amount of mitochondria, plasmids in bacteria, chloroplasts in plant cells).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Formulate an evidence-based explanation regarding how the composition of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) determines the structural organization of proteins.

a. Obtain and evaluate experiments of major scientists and communicate their contributions to the development of the structure of DNA and to the development of the central dogma of molecular biology.

b. Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information that explains how advancements in genetic technology (e.g., Human Genome Project, Encyclopedia of DNA Elements [ENCODE] project, 1000 Genomes Project) have contributed to the understanding as to how a genetic change at the DNA level may affect proteins and, in turn, influence the appearance of traits.

c. Obtain information to identify errors that occur during DNA replication (e.g., deletion, insertion, translocation, substitution, inversion, frame-shift, point mutations).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Develop and use models to explain the role of the cell cycle during growth and maintenance in multicellular organisms (e.g., normal growth and/or uncontrolled growth resulting in tumors).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Plan and carry out investigations to explain feedback mechanisms (e.g., sweating and shivering) and cellular processes (e.g., active and passive transport) that maintain homeostasis.

a. Plan and carry out investigations to explain how the unique properties of water (e.g., polarity, cohesion, adhesion) are vital to maintaining homeostasis in organisms.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Analyze and interpret data from investigations to explain the role of products and reactants of photosynthesis and cellular respiration in the cycling of matter and the flow of energy.

a. Plan and carry out investigations to explain the interactions among pigments, absorption of light, and reflection of light.

Ecosystems: Interactions, Energy, and Dynamics
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Develop and use models to illustrate examples of ecological hierarchy levels, including biosphere, biome, ecosystem, community, population, and organism.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 10
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 10
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Develop and use models to describe the cycling of matter (e.g., carbon, nitrogen, water) and flow of energy (e.g., food chains, food webs, biomass pyramids, ten percent law) between abiotic and biotic factors in ecosystems.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Use mathematical comparisons and visual representations to support or refute explanations of factors that affect population growth (e.g., exponential, linear, logistic).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Construct an explanation and design a real-world solution to address changing conditions and ecological succession caused by density-dependent and/or density-independent factors.*

Heredity: Inheritance and Variation of Traits
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Analyze and interpret data collected from probability calculations to explain the variation of expressed traits within a population.

a. Use mathematics and computation to predict phenotypic and genotypic ratios and percentages by constructing Punnett squares, including using both homozygous and heterozygous allele pairs.

b. Develop and use models to demonstrate codominance, incomplete dominance, and Mendel's laws of segregation and independent assortment.

c. Analyze and interpret data (e.g., pedigree charts, family and population studies) regarding Mendelian and complex genetic disorders (e.g., sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, type 2 diabetes) to determine patterns of genetic inheritance and disease risks from both genetic and environmental factors.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Develop and use a model to analyze the structure of chromosomes and how new genetic combinations occur through the process of meiosis.

a. Analyze data to draw conclusions about genetic disorders caused by errors in meiosis (e.g., Down syndrome, Turner syndrome).

Unity and Diversity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 20
Learning Activities: 8
Lesson Plans: 12
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain how organisms are classified by physical characteristics, organized into levels of taxonomy, and identified by binomial nomenclature (e.g., taxonomic classification, dichotomous keys).

a. Engage in argument to justify the grouping of viruses in a category separate from living things.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Analyze and interpret data to evaluate adaptations resulting from natural and artificial selection that may cause changes in populations over time (e.g., antibiotic-resistant bacteria, beak types, peppered moths, pest-resistant crops).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Engage in argument from evidence (e.g., mathematical models such as distribution graphs) to explain how the diversity of organisms is affected by overpopulation of species, variation due to genetic mutations, and competition for limited resources.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Biology
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Analyze scientific evidence (e.g., DNA, fossil records, cladograms, biogeography) to support hypotheses of common ancestry and biological evolution.

Matter and Its Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Obtain and communicate information from historical experiments (e.g., work by Mendeleev and Moseley, Rutherford's gold foil experiment, Thomson's cathode ray experiment, Millikan's oil drop experiment, Bohr's interpretation of bright line spectra) to determine the structure and function of an atom and to analyze the patterns represented in the periodic table.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Develop and use models of atomic nuclei to explain why the abundance-weighted average of isotopes of an element yields the published atomic mass.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 12
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 9
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Use the periodic table as a systematic representation to predict properties of elements based on their valence electron arrangement.

a. Analyze data such as physical properties to explain periodic trends of the elements, including metal/nonmetal/metalloid behavior, electrical/heat conductivity, electronegativity and electron affinity, ionization energy, and atomic-covalent/ionic radii, and how they relate to position in the periodic table.

b. Develop and use models (e.g., Lewis dot, 3-D ball-and-stick, space-filling, valence-shell electron-pair repulsion [VSEPR]) to predict the type of bonding and shape of simple compounds.

c. Use the periodic table as a model to derive formulas and names of ionic and covalent compounds.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Plan and conduct an investigation to classify properties of matter as intensive (e.g., density, viscosity, specific heat, melting point, boiling point) or extensive (e.g., mass, volume, heat) and demonstrate how intensive properties can be used to identify a compound.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 11
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 7
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Plan and conduct investigations to demonstrate different types of simple chemical reactions based on valence electron arrangements of the reactants and determine the quantity of products and reactants.

a. Use mathematics and computational thinking to represent the ratio of reactants and products in terms of masses, molecules, and moles.

b. Use mathematics and computational thinking to support the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a chemical reaction.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 8
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 8
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Use mathematics and computational thinking to express the concentrations of solutions quantitatively using molarity.

a. Develop and use models to explain how solutes are dissolved in solvents.

b. Analyze and interpret data to explain effects of temperature on the solubility of solid, liquid, and gaseous solutes in a solvent and the effects of pressure on the solubility of gaseous solutes.

c. Design and conduct experiments to test the conductivity of common ionic and covalent substances in a solution.

d. Use the concept of pH as a model to predict the relative properties of strong, weak, concentrated, and dilute acids and bases (e.g., Arrhenius and Brønsted-Lowry acids and bases).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Plan and carry out investigations to explain the behavior of ideal gases in terms of pressure, volume, temperature, and number of particles.

a. Use mathematics to describe the relationships among pressure, temperature, and volume of an enclosed gas when only the amount of gas is constant.

b. Use mathematical and computational thinking based on the ideal gas law to determine molar quantities.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Refine the design of a given chemical system to illustrate how LeChâtelier's principle affects a dynamic chemical equilibrium when subjected to an outside stress (e.g., heating and cooling a saturated sugar- water solution).*

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Analyze and interpret data (e.g., melting point, boiling point, solubility, phase-change diagrams) to compare the strength of intermolecular forces and how these forces affect physical properties and changes.

Energy
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Plan and conduct experiments that demonstrate how changes in a system (e.g., phase changes, pressure of a gas) validate the kinetic molecular theory.

a. Develop a model to explain the relationship between the average kinetic energy of the particles in a substance and the temperature of the substance (e.g., no kinetic energy equaling absolute zero [0K or -273.15oC]).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Chemistry
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Construct an explanation that describes how the release or absorption of energy from a system depends upon changes in the components of the system.

a. Develop a model to illustrate how the changes in total bond energy determine whether a chemical reaction is endothermic or exothermic.

b. Plan and conduct an investigation that demonstrates the transfer of thermal energy in a closed system (e.g., using heat capacities of two components of differing temperatures).

Earth and Human Activity
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Investigate and analyze the use of nonrenewable energy sources (e.g., fossil fuels, nuclear, natural gas) and renewable energy sources (e.g., solar, wind, hydroelectric, geothermal) and propose solutions for their impact on the environment.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Use models to illustrate and communicate the role of photosynthesis and cellular respiration as carbon cycles through the biosphere, atmosphere, hydrosphere, and geosphere.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Use mathematics and graphic models to compare factors affecting biodiversity and populations in ecosystems.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Engage in argument from evidence to evaluate how biological or physical changes within ecosystems (e.g., ecological succession, seasonal flooding, volcanic eruptions) affect the number and types of organisms, and that changing conditions may result in a new or altered ecosystem.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Engage in argument from evidence to compare how individual versus group behavior (e.g., flocking; cooperative behaviors such as hunting, migrating, and swarming) may affect a species' chance to survive and reproduce over time.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to describe how human activity may affect biodiversity and genetic variation of organisms, including threatened and endangered species.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Analyze and interpret data to investigate how a single change on Earth's surface may cause changes to other Earth systems (e.g., loss of ground vegetation causing an increase in water runoff and soil erosion).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Engage in an evidence-based argument to explain how over time Earth's systems affect the biosphere and the biosphere affects Earth's systems (e.g., microbial life increasing the formation of soil; corals creating reefs that alter patterns of erosion and deposition along coastlines).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Develop and use models to trace the flow of water, nitrogen, and phosphorus through the hydrosphere, atmosphere, geosphere, and biosphere.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Design solutions for protection of natural water resources (e.g., bioassessment, methods of water treatment and conservation) considering properties, uses, and pollutants (e.g., eutrophication, industrial effluents, agricultural runoffs, point and nonpoint pollution resources).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Engage in argument from evidence to defend how coastal, marine, and freshwater sources (e.g., estuaries, marshes, tidal pools, wetlands, beaches, inlets, rivers, lakes, oceans, coral reefs) support biodiversity, economic stability, and human recreation.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Analyze and interpret data and climate models to predict how global or regional climate change can affect Earth's systems (e.g., precipitation and temperature and their associated impacts on sea level, glacial ice volumes, and atmosphere and ocean composition).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information based on evidence to explain how key natural resources (e.g., water sources, fertile soils, concentrations of minerals and fossil fuels), natural hazards, and climate changes influence human activity (e.g., mass migrations).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Analyze cost-benefit ratios of competing solutions for developing, conserving, managing, recycling, and reusing energy and mineral resources to minimize impacts in natural systems (e.g., determining best practices for agricultural soil use, mining for coal, and exploring for petroleum and natural gas sources).*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Construct an explanation based on evidence to determine the relationships among management of natural resources, human sustainability, and biodiversity (e.g., resources, waste management, per capita consumption, agricultural efficiency, urban planning).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
16.) Obtain and evaluate information from published results of scientific computational models to illustrate the relationships among Earth's systems and how these relationships may be impacted by human activity (e.g., effects of an increase in atmospheric carbon dioxide on photosynthetic biomass, effect of ocean acidification on marine populations).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Environmental Science
All Resources: 9
Learning Activities: 8
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
17.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate geological and biological information to determine the types of organisms that live in major biomes.

a. Analyze and interpret data collected through geographic research and field investigations (e.g., relief, topographic, and physiographic maps; rivers; forest types; watersheds) to describe the biodiversity by region for the state of Alabama (e.g., terrestrial, freshwater, marine, endangered, invasive).

Earth's Place in the Universe
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Develop and use models to illustrate the lifespan of the sun, including energy released during nuclear fusion that eventually reaches Earth through radiation.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Engage in argument from evidence to compare various theories for the formation and changing nature of the universe and our solar system (e.g., Big Bang Theory, Hubble's law, steady state theory, light spectra, motion of distant galaxies, composition of matter in the universe).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Evaluate and communicate scientific information (e.g., Hertzsprung-Russell diagram) in reference to the life cycle of stars using data of both atomic emission and absorption spectra of stars to make inferences about the presence of certain elements.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Apply mathematics and computational thinking in reference to Kepler's laws, Newton's laws of motion, and Newton's gravitational laws to predict the orbital motion of natural and man-made objects in the solar system.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Use mathematics to explain the relationship of the seasons to the tilt of Earth's axis (e.g., zenith angle, solar angle, surface area) and its revolution about the sun, addressing intensity and distribution of sunlight on Earth's surface.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Obtain and evaluate information about Copernicus, Galileo, Kepler, Newton, and Einstein to communicate how their findings challenged conventional thinking and allowed for academic advancements and space exploration.

Earth's Systems
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Analyze and interpret evidence regarding the theory of plate tectonics, including geologic activity along plate boundaries and magnetic patterns in undersea rocks, to explain the ages and movements of continental and oceanic crusts.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Develop a time scale model of Earth's biological and geological history to establish relative and absolute age of major events in Earth's history (e.g., radiometric dating, models of geologic cross sections, sedimentary layering, fossilization, early life forms, folding, faulting, igneous intrusions).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to explain how constructive and destructive processes (e.g., weathering, erosion, volcanism, orogeny, plate tectonics, tectonic uplift) shape Earth's land features (e.g., mountains, valleys, plateaus) and sea features (e.g., trenches, ridges, seamounts).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Construct an explanation from evidence for the processes that generate the transformation of rocks in Earth's crust, including chemical composition of minerals and characteristics of sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Obtain and communicate information about significant geologic characteristics (e.g., types of rocks and geologic ages, earthquake zones, sinkholes, caves, abundant fossil fauna, mineral and energy resources) that impact life in Alabama and the southeastern United States.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Develop a model of Earth's layers using available evidence to explain the role of thermal convection in the movement of Earth's materials (e.g., seismic waves, movement of tectonic plates).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Analyze and interpret data of interactions between the hydrologic and rock cycles to explain the mechanical impacts (e.g., stream transportation and deposition, erosion, frost-wedging) and chemical impacts (e.g., oxidation, hydrolysis, carbonation) of Earth materials by water's properties.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Construct explanations from evidence to describe how changes in the flow of energy through Earth's systems (e.g., volcanic eruptions, solar output, ocean circulation, surface temperatures, precipitation patterns, glacial ice volumes, sea levels, Coriolis effect) impact the climate.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Earth and Space Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to verify that weather (e.g., temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, dew point, adiabatic cooling, condensation, precipitation, winds, ocean currents, barometric pressure, wind velocity) is influenced by energy transfer within and among the atmosphere, lithosphere, biosphere, and hydrosphere.

a. Analyze patterns in weather data to predict various systems, including fronts and severe storms.

b. Use maps and other visualizations to analyze large data sets that illustrate the frequency, magnitude, and resulting damage from severe weather events in order to predict the likelihood and severity of future events.

From Molecules to Organisms: Structures and Processes
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Develop and use models and appropriate terminology to identify regions, directions, planes, and cavities in the human body to locate organs and systems.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Analyze characteristics of tissue types (e.g., epithelial tissue) and construct an explanation of how the chemical and structural organizations of the cells that form these tissues are specialized to conduct the function of that tissue (e.g., lining, protecting).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Obtain and communicate information to explain the integumentary system's structure and function, including layers and accessories of skin and types of membranes.

a. Analyze the effects of pathological conditions (e.g., burns, skin cancer, bacterial and viral infections, chemical dermatitis) to determine the body's attempt to maintain homeostasis.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Use models to identify the structure and function of the skeletal system (e.g., classification of bones by shape, classification of joints and the appendicular and axial skeletons).

a. Obtain and communicate information to demonstrate understanding of the growth and development of the skeletal system (e.g., bone growth and remodeling).

b. Obtain and communicate information to demonstrate understanding of the pathology of the skeletal system (e.g., types of bone fractures and their treatment, osteoporosis, rickets, other bone diseases).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Develop and use models to illustrate the anatomy of the muscular system, including muscle locations and groups, actions, origins and insertions.

a. Plan and conduct investigations to explain the physiology of the muscular system (e.g., muscle contraction/relaxation, muscle fatigue, muscle tone), including pathological conditions (e.g., muscular dystrophy).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information regarding how the central nervous system and peripheral nervous system interrelate, including how these systems affect all other body systems to maintain homeostasis.

a. Use scientific evidence to evaluate the effects of pathology on the nervous system (e.g., Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, cerebral palsy, head trauma) and argue possible prevention and treatment options.

b. Design a medication to treat a disorder associated with neurotransmission, including mode of entry into the body, form of medication, and desired effects.*

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Use models to determine the relationship between the structures in and functions of the cardiovascular system (e.g., components of blood, blood circulation through the heart and systems of the body, ABO blood groups, anatomy of the heart, types of blood vessels).

a. Engage in argument from evidence regarding possible prevention and treatment options related to the pathology of the cardiovascular system (e.g., myocardial infarction, mitral valve prolapse, varicose veins, arteriosclerosis, anemia, high blood pressure).

b. Design and carry out an experiment to test various conditions that affect the heart (e.g., heart rate, blood pressure, electrocardiogram [ECG] output).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 3
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Communicate scientific information to explain the relationship between the structures and functions, both mechanical (e.g., chewing, churning in stomach) and chemical (e.g., enzymes, hydrochloric acid [HCl] in stomach), of the digestive system, including the accessory organs (e.g., salivary glands, pancreas).

a. Obtain and communicate information to demonstrate an understanding of the disorders of the digestive system (e.g., ulcers, Crohn's disease, diverticulitis).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Develop and use a model to explain how the organs of the respiratory system function.

a. Engage in argument from evidence describing how environmental (e.g., cigarette smoke, polluted air) and genetic factors may affect the respiratory system, possibly leading to pathological conditions (e.g., cystic fibrosis).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to differentiate between the male and female reproductive systems, including pathological conditions that affect each.

a. Use models to demonstrate what occurs in fetal development at each stage of pregnancy.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Use models to differentiate the structures of the urinary system and to describe their functions.

a. Analyze and interpret data related to the urinary system to show the relationship between homeostatic imbalances and disease (e.g., kidney stones, effects of pH imbalances).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Obtain and communicate information to explain the lymphatic organs and their structure and function.

a. Develop and use a model to explain the body's lines of defense and immunity.

b. Obtain and communicate information to demonstrate an understanding of the disorders of the immune system (e.g., acquired immunodeficiency syndrome [AIDS], severe combined immunodeficiency [SCID]).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Human Anatomy and Physiology
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Obtain, evaluate, and communicate information to support the claim that the endocrine glands secrete hormones that help the body maintain homeostasis through feedback loops.

a. Analyze the effects of pathological conditions (e.g., pituitary dwarfism, Addison's disease, diabetes mellitus) caused by imbalance of the hormones of the endocrine glands.

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Investigate and analyze, based on evidence obtained through observation or experimental design, the motion of an object using both graphical and mathematical models (e.g., creating or interpreting graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration versus time graphs for one- and two-dimensional motion; solving problems using kinematic equations for the case of constant acceleration) that may include descriptors such as position, distance traveled, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Identify external forces in a system and apply Newton's laws graphically by using models such as free-body diagrams to explain how the motion of an object is affected, ranging from simple to complex, and including circular motion.

a. Use mathematical computations to derive simple equations of motion for various systems using Newton's second law.

b. Use mathematical computations to explain the nature of forces (e.g., tension, friction, normal) related to Newton's second and third laws.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Evaluate qualitatively and quantitatively the relationship between the force acting on an object, the time of interaction, and the change in momentum using the impulse-momentum theorem.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Identify and analyze forces responsible for changes in rotational motion and develop an understanding of the effect of rotational inertia on the motion of a rotating object (e.g., merry-go-round, spinning toy, spinning figure skater, stellar collapse [supernova], rapidly spinning pulsar).

Energy
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Construct models that illustrate how energy is related to work performed on or by an object and explain how different forms of energy are transformed from one form to another (e.g., distinguishing between kinetic, potential, and other forms of energy such as thermal and sound; applying both the work-energy theorem and the law of conservation of energy to systems such as roller coasters, falling objects, and spring-mass systems; discussing the effect of frictional forces on energy conservation and how it affects the motion of an object).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Investigate collisions, both elastic and inelastic, to evaluate the effects on momentum and energy conservation.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Plan and carry out investigations to provide evidence that the first and second laws of thermodynamics relate work and heat transfers to the change in internal energy of a system with limits on the ability to do useful work (e.g., heat engine transforming heat at high temperature into mechanical energy and low-temperature waste heat, refrigerator absorbing heat from the cold reservoir and giving off heat to the hot reservoir with work being done).

a. Develop models to illustrate methods of heat transfer by conduction (e.g., an ice cube in water), convection (e.g., currents that transfer heat from the interior up to the surface), and radiation (e.g., an object in sunlight).

b. Engage in argument from evidence regarding how the second law of thermodynamics applies to the entropy of open and closed systems.

Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Investigate the nature of wave behavior to illustrate the concept of the superposition principle responsible for wave patterns, constructive and destructive interference, and standing waves (e.g., organ pipes, tuned exhaust systems).

a. Predict and explore how wave behavior is applied to scientific phenomena such as the Doppler effect and Sound Navigation and Ranging (SONAR).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Obtain and evaluate information regarding technical devices to describe wave propagation of electromagnetic radiation and compare it to sound propagation. (e.g., wireless telephones, magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], microwave systems, Radio Detection and Ranging [RADAR], SONAR, ultrasound).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 0
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 0
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Plan and carry out investigations that evaluate the mathematical explanations of light as related to optical systems (e.g., reflection, refraction, diffraction, intensity, polarization, Snell's law, the inverse square law).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Develop and use models to illustrate electric and magnetic fields, including how each is created (e.g., charging by either conduction or induction and polarizing; sketching field lines for situations such as point charges, a charged straight wire, or a current carrying wires such as solenoids; calculating the forces due to Coulomb's laws), and predict the motion of charged particles in each field and the energy required to move a charge between two points in each field.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physics
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Use the principles of Ohm's and Kirchhoff's laws to design, construct, and analyze combination circuits using typical components (e.g., resistors, capacitors, diodes, sources of power).

Matter and Its Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 20
Learning Activities: 4
Lesson Plans: 16
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
1.) Use the periodic table as a model to predict the relative properties and trends (e.g., reactivity of metals; types of bonds formed, including ionic, covalent, and polar covalent; numbers of bonds formed; reactions with oxygen) of main group elements based on the patterns of valence electrons in atoms.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
2.) Plan and carry out investigations (e.g., squeezing a balloon, placing a balloon on ice) to identify the relationships that exist among the pressure, volume, density, and temperature of a confined gas .

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 3
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
3.) Analyze and interpret data from a simple chemical reaction or combustion reaction involving main group elements.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
4.) Analyze and interpret data using acid-base indicators (e.g., color-changing markers, pH paper) to distinguish between acids and bases, including comparisons between strong and weak acids and bases.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 6
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
5.) Use mathematical representations to support and verify the claim that atoms, and therefore mass, are conserved during a simple chemical reaction.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
6.) Develop models to illustrate the concept of half-life for radioactive decay.

a. Research and communicate information about types of naturally occurring radiation and their properties.

b. Develop arguments for and against nuclear power generation compared to other types of power generation.

Motion and Stability: Forces and Interactions
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 5
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 4
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
7.) Analyze and interpret data for one- and two-dimensional motion applying basic concepts of distance, displacement, speed, velocity, and acceleration (e.g., velocity versus time graphs, displacement versus time graphs, acceleration versus time graphs).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 5
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
8.) Apply Newton's laws to predict the resulting motion of a system by constructing force diagrams that identify the external forces acting on the system, including friction (e.g., a book on a table, an object being pushed across a floor, an accelerating car).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
9.) Use mathematical equations (e.g., (m1v1 + m2v2) before = (m1v1 + m2v2) after) and diagrams to explain that the total momentum of a system of objects is conserved when there is no net external force on the system.

a. Use the laws of conservation of mechanical energy and momentum to predict the result of one-dimensional elastic collisions.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 1
Learning Activities: 0
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
10.) Construct simple series and parallel circuits containing resistors and batteries and apply Ohm's law to solve typical problems demonstrating the effect of changing values of resistors and voltages.

Energy
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 7
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 6
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
11.) Design and conduct investigations to verify the law of conservation of energy, including transformations of potential energy, kinetic energy, thermal energy, and the effect of any work performed on or by the system.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 3
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
12.) Design, build, and test the ability of a device (e.g., Rube Goldberg devices, wind turbines, solar cells, solar ovens) to convert one form of energy into another form of energy.*

Waves and Their Applications in Technologies for Information Transfer
Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 4
Learning Activities: 2
Lesson Plans: 2
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
13.) Use mathematical representations to demonstrate the relationships among wavelength, frequency, and speed of waves (e.g., the relation v = λ f) traveling in various media (e.g., electromagnetic radiation traveling in a vacuum and glass, sound waves traveling through air and water, seismic waves traveling through Earth).

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
14.) Propose and defend a hypothesis based on information gathered from published materials (e.g., trade books, magazines, Internet resources, videos) for and against various claims for the safety of electromagnetic radiation.

Science (2015)
Grade(s): 9 - 12
Physical Science
All Resources: 2
Learning Activities: 1
Lesson Plans: 1
Multimedia: 0
Unit Plans: 0
15.) Obtain and communicate information from published materials to explain how transmitting and receiving devices (e.g., cellular telephones, medical-imaging technology, solar cells, wireless Internet, scanners, Sound Navigation and Ranging [SONAR]) use the principles of wave behavior and wave interactions with matter to transmit and capture information and energy.